Top Banner

Click here to load reader

CHAPTER 9 Social Computing. Chapter Outline 9.1 Web 2.0 9.2 Fundamentals of Social Computing in Business 9.3 Social Computing in Business: Shopping 9.4

Dec 17, 2015

ReportDownload

Documents

  • Slide 1
  • CHAPTER 9 Social Computing
  • Slide 2
  • Chapter Outline 9.1 Web 2.0 9.2 Fundamentals of Social Computing in Business 9.3 Social Computing in Business: Shopping 9.4 Social Computing in Business: Marketing
  • Slide 3
  • Chapter Outline (continued) 9.5 Social Computing in Business: Customer Relationship Management 9.6 Social Computing in Business: Human Resource Management
  • Slide 4
  • Learning Objectives 1. Describe six Web 2.0 tools and two major types of Web 2.0 sites. 2. Describe the benefits and risks of social commerce to companies. 3. Identify the methods used for shopping socially. 4. Discuss innovative ways to use social networking sites for advertising and market research.
  • Slide 5
  • Learning Objectives (continued) 5. Describe how social computing improves customer service. 6. Discuss different ways in which human resource managers make use of social computing.
  • Slide 6
  • Social Computing Social behavior + Information systems = Value
  • Slide 7
  • Social Computing Improves collaboration Encourages user-generated content Information available to everyone Power to the People! Key: information is not anonymous
  • Slide 8
  • 9.1 Web 2.0
  • Slide 9
  • Web 1.0 versus Web 2.0 45 million users 2 billion users
  • Slide 10
  • Web 2.0 Tools Really Simple Syndication (RSS ) AJAX Tagging Blogs, Blogging, and the Blogosphere Microblogging Wikis
  • Slide 11
  • Web 2.0 Underlying Technologies AJAX Tagging Really Simple Syndication (RSS )
  • Slide 12
  • Geo-Tagging
  • Slide 13
  • Blogs and Blogging Blogs, Blogging, and the Blogosphere Popular blogsblogs
  • Slide 14
  • Microblogging
  • Slide 15
  • Wikis Wikis used in business
  • Slide 16
  • Social Networks and Mashups Social graph: the map of all relevant links or connections among your social networks members Social capital: the number of connections you have inside and between your social networks
  • Slide 17
  • Overview
  • Slide 18
  • Categories of Social Networking Web Sites Socially oriented (Facebook) Professional networking (LinkedIn) Media sharing (YouTube, Flickr, Hulu) Communication (LiveJournal, Plurk)
  • Slide 19
  • Categories of Social Networking Web Sites (continued) Collaboration (WetPaint, PBWorks) Social bookmarking (StumbleUpon, CiteuLike) Social News (Reddit, Digg) Events (Eventful, FourSquare) Virtual Meeting Place (Second Life)
  • Slide 20
  • Enterprise Social Networks In-house, private, company social networks behind the firewall for employees, former employees, business partners, and/or customers. Facilitate collaboration, such as ease in setting up virtual teams
  • Slide 21
  • Mashups A Web site that takes different content from a number of other Web sites and mixes that content together to create a new kind of content. Check out healthmap.org Check out londonprofiler.org
  • Slide 22
  • Mashup HealthMap.org
  • Slide 23
  • 9.2 Fundamentals of Social Computing in Business Benefits of social commerce to customers: Better and faster vendor responses to complaints Benefits of social commerce to businesses: Get closer to customers Social computing in business = social commerce
  • Slide 24
  • Risks of social commerce What to do about uncontrolled, negative feedback on social networking sites? The 20-80 rule
  • Slide 25
  • 9.3 Social Computing in Business: Shopping Ratings, Reviews, Recommendations Customers review book on Amazon
  • Slide 26
  • Ratings, Reviews, Recommendations (continued) Other examples Buzzillions TripAdvisor Metacritic SponsoredReviews
  • Slide 27
  • Group Shopping Examples Groupon LivingSocial WetSeal
  • Slide 28
  • Shopping Communities and Clubs Examples Ruelala Kaboodle One Kings Lane Beyond the Rack Gilt Groupe
  • Slide 29
  • Social Marketplaces and Direct Sales Examples Craigslist Flipsy Fotolia
  • Slide 30
  • Peer-to-Peer Shopping Models Collaborative Consumption Examples Airbnb CouchSurfing Yerdle SnapGoods Shared Earth
  • Slide 31
  • Car Sharing Your most underutilized, and second- most expensive, asset: Your car Take a look at Lyft (www.lyft.me)www.lyft.me Take a look at Uber (www.uber.com)www.uber.com
  • Slide 32
  • 9.4 Social Computing in Business: Marketing Social ads: ads placed in paid-for media space on social media networks Social apps (Nike+): branded online applications that support social interactions and user contributions Viral marketing: word-of-mouth
  • Slide 33
  • Social Intelligence Monitoring, collection, and analysis of socially generated data and the resultant strategic decisions
  • Slide 34
  • Market Research Historically, market research was expensive and time-consuming. Today, you provide market researchers with information on social media..and you do so for free! Examples: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn
  • Slide 35
  • 9.5 Social Computing in Business: Customer Relationship Management Empowered customers Great example: Check out the story of Dave Carroll and United Airlines (See video)video See another exampleexample
  • Slide 36
  • 9.6 Social Computing in Business: Human Resource Management Recruiting (LinkedIn) Employee Development Take a look at ITs About Business 9.6: So You Want to Find a Job