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Prepared for Airport Ground Transportation Association Spring 2008 Meeting Atlanta, GA April 8, 2008 PRESENTATION COMMERCIAL VEHICLES: WHO’S CURB IS IT

Dec 24, 2015

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  • Slide 1
  • Prepared for Airport Ground Transportation Association Spring 2008 Meeting Atlanta, GA April 8, 2008 PRESENTATION COMMERCIAL VEHICLES: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Gavin Duncan, Jacobs Consultancy
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  • 1 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Outline The facts of life Who needs to be accommodated? Potential strategies to determine priorities Other strategies Other considerations Jacobs Consultancy, formerly Leigh Fisher Associates (LFA) and Sypher, operates with main offices in the San Francisco Bay Area; the Washington, D.C. area; Ottawa, Canada; and London, UK. Jacobs Consultancys consulting staff has assisted airport operators with finance issues for over 60 years. Our consultants understand federal aviation and airport policy and can help airport operators plan for changes as the reauthorization effort proceeds. The Airport Management Consulting practice of Jacobs Consultancy provides extensive practical experience in all of the disciplines necessary for the planning and management of airports, including financial analyses and planning, economics and forecasting, commercial and concession planning, airport management and operation, facilities planning and design, ground transportation planning, noise and other environmental analyses, and simulation and operational analysis. Burlingame Office: 555 Airport Boulevard, Suite 300 Burlingame, California 94010 Telephone: (650) 579-7722 Fax: (650) 343-7722 E-mail: [email protected] Washington D.C. Office: 14900 Conference Center Drive, Suite 300 Chantilly, Virginia 20151 Telephone: (703) 961-9000 Fax: (703) 961-9318 www.jacobs-consultancy.com What approach should I use to allocate my commercial vehicle space?
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  • 2 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Who Gets to Sit at the 50-Yard Line?
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  • 3 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 The Facts of Life Your airport probably does not have enough space to meet everybodys needs Terminal requirements are reducing, but curbside demand is not Rarely do roadways and curbs dictate terminal configuration Curbsides typically have reserved space for: Disabled parking Police Other agencies (Customs & Border Patrol, Dept. of Homeland Security) Media parking Private vehicles will continue to have access to the curbsides for the near future You cant please everyone all the time
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  • 4 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Who Needs to Be Accommodated? On-demand Taxicabs Limousines Shared-ride (door-to-door) vans * Charter vehicles Limousines Vans Buses * Baggage trucks * Scheduled vehicles (i.e., line-haul vans / buses) * Airport-operated shuttles * Parking (public and employee) Rental cars Inter-terminal Courtesy vehicles (on-demand and scheduled) * Hotel / motel Off-airport parking Off-airport rental cars Public transit Parcel carriers Goods deliveries Airline crew vans Miscellaneous Military School buses Casinos * Mode may make multiple curbside stops.
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  • 5 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Who Needs to Be Accommodated? On-demand Taxicabs Limousines Shared-ride (door-to-door) vans * Charter vehicles Limousines Vans Buses * Baggage trucks * Scheduled vehicles (i.e., line-haul vans / buses) * Airport-operated shuttles * Parking (public and employee) Rental cars Inter-terminal Courtesy vehicles (on-demand and scheduled) * Hotel / motel Off-airport parking Off-airport rental cars Public transit Parcel carriers Goods deliveries Airline crew vans Miscellaneous Military School buses Casinos Private vehicles * Mode may make multiple curbside stops.
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  • 6 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 How Much Space Does an Operator Need? Demand-based (i.e., I need X spaces to meet vehicle volume demand 95% of the time during my busy periods) Capacity-based (i.e., I have Y linear feet available, how do I allocate it among the various operators?) Passenger level-of-service-based (i.e., 95% of passengers will wait 3 minutes or less for a taxicab) Combination of the above Feeder queues and hold lots can help mitigate capacity deficiencies
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  • 7 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Potential Strategies to Determine Priorities Passenger expectations Space requirements combined with curb configuration Operational needs (i.e., proximity of taxicab feeder line) Number of passengers (or passenger parties) carried Fees paid to airport
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  • 8 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Sources of Non-Airline Revenue
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  • 9 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Potential Strategies to Determine Priorities Passenger expectations Space requirements combined with curb configuration Operational needs (i.e., proximity of taxicab feeder line) Number of passengers (or passenger parties) carried Fees paid to Airport Transit first (priority for scheduled buses, shared-ride vans, public transit)
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  • 10 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Modes Consistent with Transit First
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  • 11 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Potential Strategies to Determine Priorities Passenger expectations Space requirements combined with curb configuration Operational needs (i.e., proximity of taxicab feeder line) Number of passengers (or passenger parties) carried Fees paid to Airport Transit first (priority for scheduled buses, shared-ride vans, public transit) Some desired strategies may conflict with each other Iterative process can resolve issues
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  • 12 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Sample Curbside Allocation
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  • 13 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Other Strategies Passengers carried per vehicle or linear foot of allocated curb Use of alternative fuels Use of consolidated vehicles Limit stalls below unconstrained demand Allocate space by bid (between operators of the same mode) Use simulation to identify optimal configuration and likely congestion levels
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  • 14 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Simulation Example
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  • 15 COMMERICAL GROUND TRANSPORTATION: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Airport Ground Transportation Association, April 2008 OAK572 Other Considerations Competition between operators (level playing field) Operator expectations based on revenues paid to airport (or share of total contribution) Curbside geometry Turning requirements Vertical clearances Space for passenger queues Allocate separate curbsides for private vehicles and commercial vehicles (i.e., parallel roads)
  • Slide 17
  • Prepared for Airport Ground Transportation Association Spring 2008 Meeting Atlanta, GA April 8, 2008 PRESENTATION COMMERCIAL VEHICLES: WHOS CURB IS IT ANYWAY? Gavin Duncan, Jacobs Consultancy