Top Banner

Click here to load reader

of 22

McGraw-Hill © 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. THE DYNAMICS OF MASS COMMUNCATION Joseph R. Dominick University of Georgia--Athens

Mar 27, 2015

ReportDownload

Documents

  • Slide 1

McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. THE DYNAMICS OF MASS COMMUNCATION Joseph R. Dominick University of Georgia--Athens Slide 2 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. The Nature and History of Mass Communication Slide 3 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Chapter 1 Communication: Mass and Other Forms Chapter Outline Case Study 24/7 Global News Coverage? Case Study The Communication Process Communication Settings Interpersonal Machine-Assisted Definition of Mass Communication Mass Communication Traditional Mass Media Organizations The Internet and Mass Communication Future of Mass Media Segmentation Slide 4 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. July 7, 2005 terrorist bombs exploded in London All major broadcast and cable networks reported the story within 25 minutes Technical communication breakdown warning of tsunami lead to the death of thousands Demonstrates fragility of modern communications 24/7 Global News Coverage? Slide 5 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. The Communication Process Figure 1-1: Elements of the Communication Process Slide 6 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Eight Elements of the Communication Process Source Encoding Message Channel Decoding Receiver Feedback Noise Slide 7 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Interpersonal Communication Machine-Assisted Interpersonal Communication Mass Communication Slide 8 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Interpersonal Communication Individual or groups Physical presence required Encoding is a one-step process Variety of channels Messages hard for receiver to terminate Slide 9 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Interpersonal Communication (cont) Little or no expense Messages generally private Message can pinpoint specific targets Immediate feedback Slide 10 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings SOURCE -- machine -- RECEIVER Machine-Assisted Interpersonal Communication Slide 11 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Machine-Assisted Communication Source and receiver May be individuals or groups May be a machine such as ATM Feedback Immediate or delayed May be impossible Messages Customizability varies Private or public Inexpensive to send Slide 12 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Machine-Assisted Communication Encoding can be simple to complex Source: thoughts words or symbols Machines: encode message for transmission Channel options restricted Decoding similar to encoding Machines: electrical energy light patterns Receiver: words or symbols thoughts Slide 13 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Mass Communication... occurs when a complex organization, with machine aid, produces and transmits public messages to large, heterogeneous and scattered audiences. Communication Settings Slide 14 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Mass Communication Pre-Internet: Source is a structured organization Internet: Source can be one person Sender gets little audience information Encoding a multi-stage process Channel involves machines Messages are public and impersonal Effective feedback difficult Slide 15 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Mass communication audiences Large Heterogeneous Geographically diversified Individually anonymous Self-defined Slide 16 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Communication Settings Table 1-1: Differences in Communication Settings Slide 17 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Traditional Mass Media Organizations Complex, formal organizations Multiple gatekeepers Need lots of money to operate Exist to make a profit Highly competitive Slide 18 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Traditional Mass Media Organizations Table 1-2: Global Media Giants Slide 19 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. The Internet and Mass Communication Websites Affordable and producible by individual Bypass gatekeepers Creativity reigns Low start-up and maintenance costs May or may not exist for profit Audience competition not always factor Slide 20 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. The Internet and Mass Communication Figure 1-2: Traditional Mass Communication Model Slide 21 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. The Internet and Mass Communication Figure 1-3: Internet Mass Communication Model Slide 22 McGraw-Hill 2007 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights reserved. Mass Media Segmentation Audience lifestyles more fragmented Individual segments can be large Emerging trends: Convergence (coming together) Corporate Operational Device Disintermediation (eliminating the middleman) Increasing audience control Media mobility