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Mackenzie King's Portfolio

Mar 28, 2016

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This portfolio illustrates projects that feature Mackenzie King innovating business models, designing processes, building organizations, capturing insights and facilitating co-creation. The work included was completed from 2005-2011.

  • 32 Joralemon St. #115DBrooklyn, NY 11205718. 404. 4588 @mickinzmackenzie.king@case.edu

    Design + MBAA portfolio of project stories

    ]

    MACKENZIE KING

  • Innovating business models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

    Designing processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

    Building organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

    Capturing insights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Facilitating co-creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

    Design + MBAA portfolio of project stories

    MACKENZIEKING

  • 4

  • The teenage design team experiences the design process hands-on, from mar-ket research and concept development to the refinement of prototypes and finally to store shelves. Companies gain direct access to insights direct from the source.]

    Innovating business models.Could a companys need for consumer insights merge with a schools mission to educate youth?

    SWEAT EQUITY ENTERPRISES

  • 6

    Innovating business models.

  • OPPORTUNITY: Marketing exec-utives and cool hunters often look to urban youth to forecast market trends. While teens are fascinat-ed with products and fashion, few schools tap into these passions. Similarly, business leaders note creativity as a valuable asset, yet few educators emphasize creativ-ity in their courses. Project-based learning provides skills transfer-able to numerous career paths, yet these projects are resource-intensive.

    PROCESS: SEE provides youth with real design projects with real clients. Professionals lead mod-ules that teach skills. Critiques with executives ensure market viability. Companies gain fresh creative insights and high-visibility spon-sorship. Students gain invaluable skills. In partnership with school networks and major corporations, like publisher Pearson, SEE is ex-panding.

  • 8

    MY ROLE: At SEE, I worked di-rectly with Marc Ecko, fashion en-trepreneur with sales of $1.7 bil-lion in 2007, the year I was hired. The year prior, my cold call re-sulted in an invitation to pilot his innovative program at UAMA, a NYC high school. Following the pilot, I was invited to help stream-line their operations in prepara-tion for national expansion.

    I developed their first training program, hired and trained staff in four states and managed part-nerships with national school net-works. Within six months, I was promoted to Interim Executive Di-rector. The board and I restruc-tured the staffing model, allowing me to focus on strategic business development, working directly with our clients, noted to the right. During the 2009 economic crisis, I increased our operating budget exponentially, positioning the or-ganization for significant growth.

    Innovating business models.

  • CLIENTS INCLUDED:

  • 10

    SEE fills a gap in traditional pub-lic school education by providing hands-on projects that empower youth as creative leaders with valuable insights. SEEs train-the-trainer model trains a network of educators to lead projects in their schools, with support from profes-sional designers and corporations. Instructional methods that feature communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity be-come part of teachers toolkits. SEE also helps schools build ca-pacity for earned income projects and dynamic partnerships.

    Corporations Schools

    Companies act as clients and the SEE team designs solutions to their real-world creative business chal-lenges. 100% of a companys contribution to SEE (a 501c3) goes directly towards serving more youth; this model of philanthropy can feed a companys bottomline. Companies may collaborate on a project, sponsor SEEs social net-working and learning web plat-form, adopt a SEE school or host a SEE team in their companys facili-ties, as did Marc Ecko Enterprises This option invites teen designers to work alongside professionals.

    Innovating business models.

  • 12

    SOLUTIONS: Video game acces-sories for Best Buy, sneakers for Skechers, jackets for Ecko Unlim-ited, marketing campaigns for Radio Shack and cars for Nissan were designed by SEE teams.

    SEE trained educators and design-ers to use resources like project-specific interactive workbooks and Adobe Creative Suite. The web platform will continue to connect teens with designers of the brands they love. Research shows that customers will switch brands on the basis of values. When Pauls watch was featured on Macys store shelves, customers and the press alike saw multiple levels of value within the product and its story.

    Its like The Apprentice meets Willy Wonka. -Nell Daniel, SEE Co-founder, New York Times

    The watch was a life-changing experience for Paul. -Marc Ecko, CEO, Marc Ecko Enterprises

    The raw talent in these kids blew us away. -Bryan Thompson, Designer, Nissan Design America

    Innovating business models.

    PRESS INCLUDED:

  • 14

  • CSI is blinded by their success and rapid global expansion. A new strategic pro-cess aims to infuse design into their cul-ture, allowing them to more effectively and creatively address major market threats.

    Designing processes.How does a market leader redefine its strategic planning process?

    CLOSURE SYSTEMS INTERNATIONAL

  • 16

    Designing processes.

  • PROBLEM: Closure System Inter-national (CSI) faces a paradox between its self-identification as a beverage cap and closure company and its broader range of strengths. Current and future market threats could redefine or even destroy the bottled water and soda market, their key seg-ments. They need a user-friendly process to identify and evaluate their capabilities and market op-portunities.

    PROCESS: Issues and tensions within the market and company were examined. Ideation pro-duced a range of ideas including communication, artifacts, activities and systems solutions. Research of both traditional management models and design strategy ap-proaches informed a new set of objectives, process phases, ac-tivities, tools and roles. Scenar-io-building illustrated interactions that we aspired to achieve.

  • 18

    Designing processes.

    MY ROLE: My training as a design-er and educator proved helpful in advising my fellow team mem-bers, MBA and JD-MBA students, many of which with little work ex-perience. I played a leadership role in introducing principles of design and business model inno-vation into our project approach. I often found myself playing the role of facilitator in guiding my team through the inherently am-biguous phase of defining the key problem. I modeled design techniques and tools through the ideation and development phases that then became elements of our final solution. Examining bottled beverage substitutes proved im-portant. Surrounded by walls of whiteboards, visualization and concept mapping occurred daily.Hired by, and working alongside, the companys Senior Vice Presi-dent of Global Strategy, we had eight months to define and solve an undefined problem.

  • A Proce

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    Melissa

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    Mark F

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    Matt Ja

    necek,

    MBA C

    andida

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    Macke

    nzie Kin

    g, MBA

    Candid

    ate

    Hui Wa

    ng, MB

    A Cand

    idate

    Closure

    System

    s Intern

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    , Inc.

    Design

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    Case W

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    Reserv

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    Weath

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    Concep

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    A Project R

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    Melissa Du

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    Mark Freud

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    Matt Janec

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    ndidate

    Mackenzie

    King, MBA

    Candidate

    Hui Wang, M

    BA Candida

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    Closure Sys

    tems

    Internation

    al, Inc.

    Design-Infu

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    Process

    Case Weste

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    Weatherhe

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    April 27, 201

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    Design in M

    anagement

    Concepts &

    Methods

    of Practice

    2010/11

    PR

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    PR

    OC

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    GU

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    A Design Brief prepar

    ed by:

    Melissa Duffy, MBA Ca

    ndidate

    Mark Freudenthal, JD/

    MBA Candidate

    Matt Janecek, MBA Ca

    ndidate

    Mackenzie King, MBA

    Candidate

    Hui Wang, MBA Cand

    idate

    Closure Systems Inte

    rnational, Inc.

    Exploration of Identi

    ty through Design

    Case Western Reserve

    University

    Weatherhead School

    of Management

    December 6, 2010

    Design in Managemen

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    Concepts & Methods o

    f Practice

    2010/11

    DES

    IGN

    BR

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  • 20

    Space Activities Tools

    After examining studios of various design schools and firms, the team envisioned a space that would promote interaction, showcase in-spiration and track projects.

    CSIs former R&D lab housed equipment to test the functionality and durability of caps. The new lab would encourage experim