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Western Wildlife and Wildlife Notes Index · PDF file WWIndex_Topic&Author_Dec2017 1 Western Wildlife and Wildlife Notes Index By Topic This index covers Western Wildlife volumes 1

Jun 14, 2020

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  • WWIndex_Topic&Author_Dec2017 1

    Western Wildlife and Wildlife Notes Index

    By Topic This index covers Western Wildlife volumes 1 to 21 and Wildlife Notes 1 to 18. WW refers to the article appearing in Western Wildlife Newsletters (i.e. WW1.4(10) is Newsletter volume 1, number 4, page 10). WN refers to the Wildlife Note series (i.e. WN3 is Wildlife Note number 3).

    A Aboriginal heritage  learning about country – WW14.2(19)  min-min lights – WW3.2(17)  Ngadju kala: aboriginal fire knowledge in

    Great Western Woodlands – WW20.1(6)  story of Muja the WA Christmas tree –

    WW3.2(8)  why mankind tells stories – WW3.2(8)  wild grapes bush tucker – WW12.1(14) Acacias  Acacia – web-based identification key –

    WW18.4(15)  Acacia anomala, wattle grass – WW10.4(17)  Acacia nilotica has reached the Kimberley! -

    WW7.1(14)  Acacia nilotica on the Durack River -

    WW8.1(19)  Acacia paradoxa: native or alien? –

    WW9.3(18)  Acacia saligna genetics and invasiveness –

    WW16.4(14)  local acacia seeds for human consumption -

    WW8.1(14)  most Australian wattles likely to remain

    Acacia – WW8.4(4)  value of prickles - WW8.1(9)  wattle I plant – WW3.4(10)  wattle pancakes for lunch – WW5.2(14)  wattle – symbol of a nation – WW9.3(12)  Wellstead – almost wattled out! – WW8.3(5)  when is a wattle not an Acacia – when it’s a

    Racosperma! Allocasuarinas – see Trees Amphibians  an odd find over east – WW17.3(10) Ancient flora/fauna/features  ancient rivers in the wheatbelt – WW4.4(1)  earwig flies? Ancient and mysterious insects–

    WW12.1  explaining Australia’s Pleistocene extinctions

    – WW13.4(1)  hallowed landscapes and deep time natural

    wonders – WW21(18)  how ancient DNA was able to identify the

    extinct rock-wallaby on Depuch Island– WW7.3

     Kimberley’s Devonian Great Barrier Reef - WN19.2(12)

     surviving the dinosaurs – the Dasypogonaceae – WW11.4(16)

     trace fossils at Kalbarri – WN19.2(12)  why did the megafauna become extinct? –

    WW11.2(10) Animal ethics  legal aspects of trapping feral animals –

    WW6.3(12) Ants – see Invertebrates ANZECC Working Group  visit to WA – WW2.1(15) Aquatic invertebrates – see Invertebrates Australian flora  root clusters of Western Australian plants: a

    curiosity in context – WW9.2(1)

    B Bandicoots – see Mammals (native) Banksias  banksia, propeller: a Methuselah among

    plants! – WW15.5(11)  banksia woodlands in Western Australia –

    animal responses to fire in – WW16.3(1)  banksias – Are you lost in the bush? Let a

    banksia help you out! – WW11.3(12)  banksias, bardies and cockies – WW1.3(11)  banksias – impact of groundwater use and

    decreased rainfall – WW12.2(6)  banksias – rare plant survival – WW12.3(18)  banksia woodland recovery after fire –

    WW20.1(10)  using the timing of flowering by banksias to

    monitor climate change – WW16.4(10) Bats – see Mammals (native) Bees – see Invertebrates Bilbies – see Mammals (native) Biodiversity  biodiversity and farm forestry – WN12  biodiversity of the Carnarvon Basin -

    WW6.3(14)  biodiversity of an economic hotspot, the

    Pilbara Biological Survey – WW13.3(6)  bushfire diversity can promote biodiversity –

    WW9.3(8)  bushland heritage – WW14.3(14)  celebrating biodiversity on your block –

    WW14.2(8)  do human observers appreciate plant

    diversity? – WW15.1(6)  economic aspects – WW4.1(16)

  • WWIndex_Topic&Author_Dec2017 2

     global warming – adversely affect ‘global biodiversity hotspots’ – WW10.4(12)

     habitat islands - WW2.1(5)  hybridisation in nature – WW16.4(6)  International Year of Biodiversity –

    WW14.2(8)  South west – a region for global conservation

    – WW17.4(12)  tree planting in Western Australia: enhancing

    the opportunities for conservation of biodiversity - WW5.4(14)

     Warwick Bushland, biodiversity of – WW14.3(4)

    Biological control (see also: Weeds)  blackberries – WW3.3(20)  blackberry rust arrives in Denmark –

    WW13.2(6)  bridal creeper – WW1.4(10), WW4.1(17)  Paterson’s curse – WW1.4(10) Biosecurity  nursery plants – risk of pests and soilborne

    pathogens – WW10.4(7)  protecting WAs ag and food sector and

    environment – WW18.4(10) Birds (see also: Nests)  attracting them to your backyard – WW3.2(18)  Australasian bittern project – WW15.4(19)  Australasian bittern – things that go ‘boom!’ in

    the night – WW16.1(1)  Australasian bittern – Wildfires in Esperance

    area – WW20.1(1)  barn owl or min-min lights – WW3.2(17)  beautiful bird – for a parrot! – WW16.3 (7)  bird pollinator observations in carnivorous

    plants - WW8.1(10)  bird presence, what is the value of long-term

    datasets of – WW18.2(4)  bird’s-eye view (Carnaby’s cockatoos) –

    WW14.3(11)  birds of Rottnest Island – WW13.4(16)  birds on farms project – WW1.1(6)  birds on farms update – WW2.2(2)  birds in the eastern Wheatbelt – WW3.3(18)  birds on roadsides – WW5.3(14)  birds of Lavender Nature Reserve –

    WW18.1(16)  black cockatoo in banksias – WW1.3(11)  black cockatoo Friday – WW18.4(9)  black cockatoos, hungry – WW10.2(8)  black cockatoo research at the wildlife

    genetics lab – WW12.2(12)  blue-breasted fairy-wrens and vegetation

    corridors – WW3.2(9)  boobooks chirruping – WW14.2(14)  boobook research – WW20.1(14)  bush stone-curlew – WW2.4(6)  bush stone-curlews and homesteads –

    WW9.1(7)  bustards – what’s the story? – WW9.4(3)  miner’s egg turns into a real bustard! –

    WW18.4(15)

     Carnaby’s cockatoo, conserving – WW3.4(13)  Carnaby's cockatoo - a cocky in crisis -

    WW6.3(4)  Carnaby’s cockatoo – two families in one

    year! – WW11.2(7)  Carnaby’s cockatoo release – WW12.3(17)  Carnaby’s cockatoo – is it a rain bird? –

    WW17.4(16)  Carnaby’s cockatoos feasting on hakea seeds

    – WW17.4(17)  Carnaby’s cockatoos, individually marked: a

    challenge and opportunity for keen photographers – WW18.1(1)

     Carnaby’s cockatoo immatures, meeting the challenge: photographic identification of banded WW18.3(6)

     Carnaby’s cockatoo, tree hollows & fate of large hollow-bearing trees – WW18.4(4)

     Carnaby’s in Candy’s Bush Reserve – WW19.1(7)

     ‘Cockatoo care’ – a public programme – WW9.4(11)

     cockie capers – WW14.2(9)  cockie hunting (Carnaby’s cockatoos) –

    WW14.3(11)  courteous cockies – WW14.3(18)  crow or raven? – WW14.4(5)  cuckoo pallid, out and about in the bush –

    WW15.4(12)  cuckoos – WW5.3(8)  cuckoos, caterpillars and cape lilacs -

    WW7.3(13)  de bait debate – WW17.2(18)  diet analysis of malleefowl - WW7.4(3)  DIY bird hide – WW9.2(12)  don’t walk where seabirds burrow –

    WW14.1(16)  eagles, nest observing – WW3.2(13)  eagles-picked clean – WW19.2(10)  effects of climate on breeding in Australian

    birds – WW8.4(10)  emu eggs, jewels in the crown – WW14.2(16)  evolution of conservation – “cockatubes” –

    WW11.4(15)  future of Australia’s birds – WW4.1(1)  honeyeaters, competition between –

    WW2.2(15)  honeyeaters, nectar nomads a natural history

    of – WW15.4(1)  increase in stock watering points in rangeland

    ecosystems leads to a decline in native bird populations – WW14.3(17)

     individually marked wild Carnaby’s cockatoos: a challenge and opportunity for keen photographers – WW18.1(1)

     inland dotterel – WW14.2(10)  in tree belts through farmland in Frankland –

    WW2.2(1)  leg flags on waders – WW3.1(17)  listen to the birds – WW12.3(20)  lorikeets, on the look-out for – WW12.2(8)

  • WWIndex_Topic&Author_Dec2017 3

     magpie, Australian – WW5.2(1)  making farms less attractive to galahs, little

    corellas and ringneck parrots – WW4.4(14)  malleefowl – WW2.1(1)  malleefowl, diagnosing the decline using

    sightings data – WW10.2(12)  malleefowl, marvellous – WW14.2(15)  malleefowl in Merredin Peak Reserve –

    WW12.1(11)  malleefowl monitoring – WW16.1(10)  malleefowl active mounds on Kanandah –

    WW20.1(4)  monitoring for the past and the future -

    WW7.3(14)  mulga parrots (outback death trap) –

    WW17.1(3)  Nankeen night heron (aka rufous night heron)

    - WW19.1(6)  natural pest control – WW1.3(9)  nectar nomads: a natural history of

    honeyeaters – WW15.4(1)  needs of bird-watching tourists – WW14.3(16)  nesting in the wheatbelt - yellow-rumped

    thornbill, Acanthiza chrysorrhoa - WW7.3(17)  new Atlas of Australian Birds – WW3.2(12)  noisy scrub-bird in Darling Range – WW4.3(1)  our scaly friend – WW17.2(18)  owl, sub-fossil deposits reveal small mammal