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THE WILDLIFE SOCIETY: THE WILDLIFE SOCIETY: IS STUDENT MEMBERSHIP IS STUDENT MEMBERSHIP IN TWS BENEFICIAL? IN TWS BENEFICIAL? First Name Last Name, Subunit Officer Title Subunit Name The Wildlife Society University of Maine TWS Student Chapter
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THE WILDLIFE SOCIETY: IS STUDENT MEMBERSHIP IN TWS BENEFICIAL? First Name Last Name, Subunit Officer Title Subunit Name The Wildlife Society University.

Jan 15, 2016

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  • THE WILDLIFE SOCIETY: IS STUDENT MEMBERSHIP IN TWS BENEFICIAL?

    First Name Last Name, Subunit Officer TitleSubunit NameThe Wildlife SocietyUniversity of Maine TWS Student Chapter

  • BENEFITS OF MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIESInfluencing Legislation and Public OpinionInformation Sharing and CommunicationNetworking Collective Problem SolvingProfessional Development Ethical and Professional StandardsPreserving History

  • INFLUENCING LEGISLATIONAND PUBLIC OPINIONIn democratic societies, individuals can make a difference. However, in todays complex political environment, there is strength in numbers.

    Professional and scientific societies represent their members with key decision makers in government.

    TWS comments on important legislation and policies affecting wildlife and wildlife professionals.

    TWS develops technical reports and policies on important issues in wildlife management and conservation.

    TWS keeps its members informed of critical issues.

    TWS informs the public and media through press releases.

  • INFORMATION SHARINGAND COMMUNICATIONKnowledge is power. Working wildlife professionals and students need to stay current on news, issues, skills, and research findings.

    Information sharing and dissemination is a key role of professional and scientific societies.

    Information sharing and dissemination at TWS occurs through a variety of integrated venues:

    -Technical print and online publications (JWM, Wildlife Monographs, technical reports)-Member electronic newsletter (The Wildlifer, Wildlife Policy News)-Popular print and online magazine (The Wildlife Professional)-TWS Web site-Chapter, Section and Annual Conferences and Meetings

  • NETWORKING

    Nobody gets to where they are in life without the help of others.

    An ability to interact and network with other professionals is a critical benefit of professional and scientific societies.

    TWS Annual, Chapter and Section Conferences are ideal places for wildlife professionals and students to establish and maintain networks.

    Students benefit from an ability to interact with and learn from working professionals (and vice versa).

    These connections are a source of scientific collaborations, internships, graduate study opportunities, jobs, and life-long friendships. TWS Central Mountains and Plains Section Annual Meeting, 2006

  • COLLECTIVE PROBLEM SOLVING

    More heads (brains) are better than one.

    As a community of experts, professional and scientific societies can engage in collective problem-solving and professional debate.

    TWS has expert working groups and technical review committees that review our current knowledge and develop reports and policies on cutting edge issues in wildlife management and conservation.

  • PROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT As a community of experts, professional and scientific societies have an obligation to groom the next generation to take their place.

    Working professionals also need to keep their knowledge and skills sets up to date through continuing education.

    Professional development and mentoring are critical functions of such organizations.

    TWS greatly values its student membership and recognizes that they are the future of the organization and the profession.

    Texas A&M Kingsville TWS Student Chapter

  • Every community needs guidance on what is acceptable behavior and what is not and this is especially important in professional communities. Communities also need to define its standards for training and professionalism.The credibility of an expert community can rise or fall depending on how well it addresses such issues.TWS has a certification program for wildlife biologists and a code of ethics to help guide their professional behavior. ETHICAL AND PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

  • PRESERVING HISTORYThe existence of professional and scientific organizations, especially long-established ones, allows their members to continue to build on the traditions established by and many significant contributions of those who came before them.

    Societies like TWS help to track the history of our profession and assist us in remembering what we might otherwise forget.

    Such continuity reminds us that we are part of something larger than ourselves-something that began before we were here and will hopefully continue long after we are gone.

  • PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITIONIndividuals that make significant contributions to their profession deserve recognition for their efforts.

    A critical function of professional and scientific societies is to honor such individuals accordingly.

    TWS gives many awards, including for chapter of the year, student chapter of the year, and for significant publications, conservation and research efforts.

    The highest award given by the Society is the Aldo Leopold Memorial Award reserved for those who have made outstanding contributions to the wildlife profession. Paul Krausman, University of Arizona receives the 2006 Aldo Leopold Memorial Award from TES President, Robert Brown

  • WHAT IS TWS DOINGFOR STUDENT MEMBERS?TWS has terrific student membership benefits:

    Online Career CenterOnline Mentoring ProgramResume workshopsCareer FairStudent Travel GrantsStudent Professional Development Working GroupInternships and Grants posted onlineStudent-only listservReduced feesAnnual ConferenceLeadership InstituteAwardsPublication & Presentation opportunitiesSocial networking/information: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Making Tracks: The Wildlife Society Blog

  • STUDENT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKING GROUPWorking group established in 2005 as a forum for TWS student members and a vehicle for communicating student member needs to TWS Council.

    Current focus is on developing student programs that allow TWS members to be a cut above the rest in hiring competition for wildlife jobs.

    The working group appoints the student liaison to TWS Council so students voices can be heard while making important decisions in the Society.

    McGill University, Canada TWS Student ChapterFramingham State University TWS Student ChapterUniversity of Arkansas TWS Student Chapter

  • REDUCED FEESFOR STUDENTSTWS offers:

    Reduced membership fees for students (1/2 regular price).Reduced registration fees for student members attending its annual conference.Reduced application fee for certification.Reduced price on TWS textbooks and other publications.Washington State University TWS Student Chapter

  • TWS CONFERENCESStudent and young professional-focused activities at the TWS Annual Conference:

    Student-professional mixerCareer FairResume writing workshopStudent field-tripMentoring programStudent-only Research in progress poster sessionStudent travel grant programLeadership Institute for young professionals

    University of Maine TWS Student ChapterFramingham State University TWS Student Chapter

  • TWS LEADERSHIP INSTITUTETWS Leadership Institute was launched in 2006.

    10+ participants receive grants to attend the TWS Annual Conference.

    The goal of this program is to provide basic leadership training and skills for young professionals (2-3 years out of college).

    Mix of practical exercises, classroom work, readings, discussions, lectures, and writing projects.

    Participants will be tracked for several years to evaluate program success. TWS Leadership Institute, Class of 2006

  • TWS ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONContemporary college and university students have grown up with computers and electronic communication. TWS understands that it needs world-class information resources that meet the needs of modern wildlife professionals. TWS hascreated:

    Social networking communication through Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Making Tracks: The Wildlife Society Blog.Online Career Center.State-of-the-art Online Mentoring Program.Student-only section on its Web site.Grants database.Student-only listserv to post scholarships, part-time jobs, grants, internships, and foster discussion amongst students.Digitized all legacy publications (1937-) for online accessDigitized all technical reviews

  • STUDENT PARTICIPATION AND RECOGNITION AT TWSStudent members are encouraged to participate in TWS Working Groups, and especially the Student Professional Development Working Group, which is helping to chart a course for student activities at TWS.

    TWS gives Student Chapter and Student Chapter Advisor of the Year Awards to recognize excellence.

    Students are also encouraged to participate in training workshops and field activities at the TWS Annual Conference and at events organized by chapters, sections and student conclaves. Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, AL TWS Student ChapterFramingham State University TWS Student Chapter2006 TWS Chapter of the Year AwardUniversity of Tennessee-Martin

  • CONCLUSIONSMembership in relevant professional and scientific societies has many benefits.

    University and college students have much to gain from their involvement and participation in such organizations.

    TWS is working hard to improve member benefits and activities for students and will continue to do so in the future.

    TWS future and the future of North Americas precious wildlife resources depend on it!Texas A&M Kingsville TWS Student ChapterUniversity of Maine TWS Student Chapter

  • WE NEED YOUR HELP!TO GROW AND MAKE TWS MORE EFFECTIVETWS INVITES YOU to

    Join TWS and get involved.

    Run for office and vote in elections.

    Join and participate in sections, chapters and working groups.

    Recruit and mentor new members.

    Become a Certified Wildlife Biologist.

    Contribute and subscribe to TWS publications.

    Attend and participate in TWS conferences and workshops.