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Smart Surge Protector Team Members Jason Long & Billy Gates, Jr. Professor Stephen E. Saddow, Advisor

Jan 05, 2016

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  • Smart Surge Protector

    Team MembersJason Long & Billy Gates, Jr.Professor Stephen E. Saddow, Advisor

  • MotivationMost residential surge protection devices fail without warning.

    Some have indicator lights that are difficult to see.

    A smart surge protection device that reports the status of the surge protection element (varistor) to the user via a computer interface.

    A GUI (Graphic User Interface) will be used to report the status to the user after reading the status of the monitoring circuit.

  • Team MembersJasonLongBilly J Gates,Jr.Dr. S. E. Saddow

  • Team OrganizationBilly J Gates, Jr.Monitoring interface Presentation organizationComputer programWeb PageExecutive SummaryTest SpecificationsObjectiveJason Long RequirementsObjectivesReferencesWeb PageProblem StatementSurge Protection circuit

  • How to observe the protection device state?

    1. LEDs Are not always visible to user2. Alarms Are often ignored by user3. Our design Give the user a computer prompt of the status of the device as it reaches the end of its lifetime.

  • AbstractA monitoring surge protection device that reports the status of the surge protection circuit (varistor) to the computer.

    A GUI (Graphic User Interface) will be used to report the status to the user, by reading the status of the monitoring circuit.

  • Objective 1.Test Source voltages: The Surge Protection Device (SPD) will operate from any standard 125V three-prong receptacle outlet that is designed for 120 VAC 60Hz. 2. Fire Standards: The device will meet all the National Fire and Safety Code and the National Electrical Codes. 3. Physical Packaging: We are not so much concerned with the physical packaging at the moment, although we know the design will be contained in a molded plastic case. The main concern will be getting the design to work. 4. Monitoring Time: We will check the status of the varistor for any changes caused by an over-voltage or over-current every 1s.

  • Objective

    5. Transient Voltage Surge Suppression: The SPD will be designed to suppress a continuous transient voltage of 135V AC.

    6. Clamping Voltage: Clamping is the term used for the process whereby surge protection devices reduce or attenuate transients and limit the surges reaching the protected load to a specific lower voltage level. The lowest clamping voltage recognized by United Laboratories (UL) is 330 V in the UL1449 standard. Rise time for the voltage must be within the 8s (microseconds), and with a 20s trail off. 7. Peak transient current: The SPD will be able to handle a peak transient voltage of 1200 Amps. Rise time for the current must be within the 8s (microseconds), and with a 20s trail off.

  • Objective 8. 8. Operation Indicator (Graphical User Interface): Our SPD operation indicator will be a graphical user interface. The graphical user interface will give the user the number of times the SPD has been placed in it protection mode (against over- voltage and over-currents) and the number of times the SPD has before the device fails. This information will be gather via a RS-232 serial port.

    9. Surge Protection: The SPD will protect against transient voltage surges line to neutral, line to ground, and neutral to ground.

    10. Measuring circuit: This circuit will trigger if an over-current or over- voltage thru the varistor. Triggering a counter that will hold the number of times the varistor has been activated for protection. We will use a battery to power the counter in the event of power loss.

  • ApproachComputer Program C++Simulation PSPICE & Electronics WorkbenchHardware Varistor RS-232 interface counter

  • DesignNLGENERGY DISAPATED AS HEAT DURING CLAMPRESISDUAL TRAVELS ON TO LOAD355 V CLAMPING LEVELTRANSIENT RESIDUAL SHUNTED TO NEUTRAL1000 V, 100A100 KHZSINGLE SPD COMPONENTLOADTRANSIENT CURRENT IS SHUNTED L-N BY SPD COMPONENTMONITORING CIRCUITPEARSON COIL

  • 4.DesignSMART SURGE PROTECTION DEVICESURGE MONITORINGCIRCUITMETAL OXIDE VARISTORGRAPHICAL USERINTERFACEC++ COMPUTERPROGRAMPEARSON COILSAND COMPARITORRS-232PORT

  • 4.ComputerSurge Protector Monitor circuitDesign

  • DesignSurge Protection device This part of the circuit will consist of a varistor that will go into its active mode when an over-voltage or over-current occurs.Monitoring Circuit This part of the will trigger when a over-voltage or over-current occurs. To detect the over-voltage or over-current will sample the operation of the varistor when it is in its active mode.Counter The counter will be incremented each time the varistor is in it active mode. Computer Program(GUI) The program will have a preset value for the counter and it will check the counter for the maximum allowed count and warn the user by prompting the user with a visible icon on the computer screen.

  • DesignMETAL OXIDE VARISTORPEARSON COILSURGE MONITORINGCIRCUITGRAPHICAL USERINTERFACEMaximum Continuous Voltage RMS = 135 Vac, Maximum Transient Energy = 10 JoulesPeak Transient Current = 1200 amps, Maximum Clamping Voltage = 355 V, Transient Power Dissipation = .25 W Maximum Peak Current = 2000 amps, Useable Rise Time = 20nsMaximum RMS Current = 25 amps Op-amp, comparator, and current meter This part of the will trigger when a over-voltage or over-current occurs. To detect the over-voltage or over-current will sample the operation of the varistor when it is in its active mode.C++ Program The program will have a preset value for the counter and it will check the counter for the maximum allowed count and warn the user by prompting the user with a visible icon on the computer screen.

  • Test SpecificationsCircuit Simulations Used to test component design

    Software Software used to check the status of device

  • Test Specification

  • AcknowledgementsWe would like to thank Dr. Stan Saddow, our advisor for his help in our design project.

  • References[1]K. Lahti, K. Kannus, K. Nousiainen, Comparison between the DC leakage currents of polymer housed metal oxide surge arresters in very humid ambient conditions and in water immersion tests, IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery,vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 163-168, Jan 1999.[2]P. M. Wherett, C. J. Kossman, J. R. Gumley, New techniques for designing surge protection devices, Journal of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Austraila, vol. 19, no.1, pp. 45-50, 1999[3]M. Akbar, A. Monir, Failure study of metal-oxide surge arrestors, Electric Power Systems Research, vol. 50, no.2, pp. 79-82, 1999[4]M. Aceves, J. Pedraza, J. A. Reynoso-Hernandez, C. Falcony, W. Calleja, Study on Al/silicon rich oxide/Si structure as a surge suppressor, DC, frequency response and modeling, Microelectronics Journal, vol. 30, no. 9, pp. 855-862, 1999.[5]T. A. Short, R.H. Ammon, Monitoring results of the effectiveness of surge arrester spacings on distribution line protection. IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, vol. 14, no.3, pp. 1142-1150, 1999.[6]D. R. Miller, J. J. Woodworth, C. W. Daley, Watts loss of polymer housed surge arresters in a simulated Florida coastal climate, IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 940-947, 1999.[7]A. Piantini, C. V. S. Malagodi, Voltage surges transferred to the secondary of distribution transformers, IEE Conference Publication, vol. 1, no. 467, pp. 1.365.P6-1.368.P6, 1999.[8]H. Sugimoto, A. Asakawa, S. Yokoyama, K. Nakada, Effectiveness of installing two pairs of distribution surge arrestors in parallel, IEE Conference Publication, vol. 2, no. 467, pp.2.246.S13-2.249.S13, 1999.[9]F. Perrot, Efficient method to characterize the performance of metal oxide varistors, IEE Conference Publication, vol.2, no. 467, pp. 2.305.P1-2.308.P1, 1999.[10]W. Bassi, N. Matsuo, A. Piantini, Currents and charge absorbed by low-voltage SPDs in overhead distribution systems due to lightning, IEE Conference Publication, vol. 2, no. 467, pp. 2.349.P1-2.352.P1, 1999.