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Jul 31, 2016

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  • LOVELANDLOVELANDHERALD $1.00

    WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 2016 BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

    Your Community Press newspaperserving Loveland, Miami Township,Symmes Township

    Vol. 97 No. 52 2016 The Community Press

    ALL RIGHTS RESERVEDNews ..........................248-8600Retail advertising ..............768-8404Classified advertising .........242-4000Delivery ........................576-8240

    See page A2 for additional information

    Contact usGOING MOBILEFind the latestcommunity news on ournew and improvedCincinnati.com mobileapp.

    TOURNEY TIMEHow is your high school teamdoing in post-season play?Find out athttp://cin.ci/1Cmt6hr.

    AT WARDS CORNER513-583-8900

    520 Wards Corner RdLoveland, OH 45140

    www.allaboutkidslc.com/wardscorner

    Happy Memorial Day!!!!We oIer a special feature to those near and far...Parents and grandparents of children attending All About Kids at Wards Corner having internet access can watch their childs daily activities through real time Webcam Watch MeGrow. Call 513-538-8900 to learn more.&(

    Now you can get more foryour dollar.

    In the next seven to 10 daysyour carrier will collect foryour Loveland Herald.

    When you pay your carrierthe monthly charge of $3.50,you will receive a couponworth $3.50 off a classified ad.

    Not only will you be helpingto supplement your carriersincome, you will also be savingmoney doing it.

    For information about ourcarrier program, call circula-tion manager Steve Barraco at248-7110 or email him at sbar-raco@communitypress. com.

    Collection time

    A rundown of area Memori-al Day weekend activities:

    Blue Ash: The Blue AshMemorial Day Parade willstart at 10:15 a.m. Monday,May 30, at Reed HartmanHighway and Cooper Roadand will go down Cooper, Ken-wood and Hunt roads to theBicentennial Veterans Memo-rial Park. The Memorial Dayceremony will begin at 11:30a.m. Jim Meyers, who servedas a U.S. Marine Corps officerduring the Vietnam War area,is the keynote speaker.

    The Blue Ash MontgomerySymphony Orchestra Memori-al Day concert will be from 6p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, May 30,at Blue Ash Towne Square.

    Indian Hill: The MemorialDay celebration will be 10:30a.m. Monday, May 30, at Arm-strong Chapel United Method-ist Church at 5125 Drake Road.

    Loveland: Monday, May 30.Parade will begin at 9 a.m. atLoveland Elementary School,600 Loveland-Madeira Road,and travel to Veterans Memo-rial Park at the corner of WestLoveland Avenue and River-side Drive, where a MemorialDay ceremony will be con-ducted.

    For additional information,contact Misty Cheshire, 513-707-1437. If you or your or-ganization would like to be inthe parade, register online atwww.lovelandoh.com/memori-al-day.

    Madeira: The MadeiraMemorial Day March will be

    at 10 a.m. Monday, May 30.The march will go from Ma-deira Middle School to Mc-Donald Commons, where acelebration will follow.

    Milford: Memorial Dayservices will be Monday, May30, at 9:30 a.m. at MemorialPark at the corner of Main andSycamore streets; at 10 a.m. atGreenlawn Cemetery at 687U.S. Route 50 and at 10:30 a.m.at St. Andrew Cemetery onSouth Milford Road.

    Montgomery: The BlueAsh Montgomery SymphonyOrchestra Memorial Day con-cert will be from 6 p.m. to 8p.m. Monday, May 30, at BlueAsh Towne Square.

    The Blue Ash MontgomerySymphony Orchestra Memori-al Day concert will be from 6p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, May 30,at Blue Ash Towne Square.

    Symmes Township: Thetownship will honor veteransfrom 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday,May 27, at Home of the BravePark, 11605 Lebanon Road.

    Cheryl Popp, director ofHonor Flight Tri-State andPeter Bronson, columnist withCincy Magazine and owner ofChilidog Express, will be thekeynote speakers. They co-authored the book, Legacy ofCourage, True Stories of Hon-or Flight Veterans.

    SWEET from SycamoreHigh Schools Choral Programwill perform at the event.

    For more information, con-tact the township office at513-683-6644.

    MEMORIAL DAY WEEKENDACTIVITIES

    PROVIDED

    The Arlington MemorialGardens will displaymore than 400 memorialflags atop flagpoles over10 acres at the cemeteryfor the Field ofMemories, which willbe be open to the public9 a.m.-7 p.m. dailyThursday May 26 Monday May 31.

    There were times whenHeidi Bright preparedto die after being diag-nosed with a terminal cancerin July 2009.

    Today Bright delivers amessage of hope and healingthrough her book ThriverSoup and speaking to groups.This is the third traditionallypublished book by the Milfordauthor.

    Its sort of like a recipetemplate for healing, Brightsaid. Its not a cook book itsa template for healing.

    Brights book addresseshealing from every angle:physical, medical, nutritional,social, emotional, mental andspiritual. It is exactly thesame approach she used inher own survival and healing.Highly undifferentiated endo-metrial sarcoma is a mostrare form of uterine sarcoma.At a uterine sarcoma confer-ence about a year ago, onlyhalf the people in the roomraised their hand when Bright

    Former Lovelandresidents shares tipson surviving cancer

    Chuck Gibsonloveland@communitypress.com

    CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

    Heidi Bright survived a rare terminal cancer and offers hope and healingto others in her book Thriver Soup. See BOOK, Page 2A

    Don Chandler can remem-ber walking in Milfords Me-morial Day parade with hisgrandfather in the 1950s, whenhe was in grade school.

    So hes sad that other chil-dren wont get that experiencethis year - and maybe not afterthat, either.

    For the first time in at least60 years, American LegionVictor Stier Post 450 in Milfordwill not sponsor a MemorialDay parade.

    Weve been talking aboutthis for a couple of years nowas more of our members getolder, and we just dont have

    the younger people or a colorguard to do this anymore, saidPost Adjunct Chandler, whoserved from 1969 to 1971 in theU.S. Navy.

    Community participationalso is dropping, he said.

    We get the Boy Scouts andthe Girl Scouts and thats aboutall, Chandler said.

    Chandler said the AmericanLegion post at 450 Victor Stier

    No Milford Memorial Dayparade scheduled this yearJeanne Houckjhouck@communitypress.com

    See PARADE, Page 2A

    PROVIDED

    American Legion Victor Stier Post 450 in Milford will not sponsor aMemorial Day parade this year.

  • 2A LOVELAND HERALD MAY 25, 2016 NEWS

    LOVELANDHERALD

    NewsRichard Maloney Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7134, rmaloney@communitypress.com Marika Lee Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7577,mlee1@communitypress.com Sheila Vilvens Reporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7139, svilvens@communitypress.comCindy SchroederReporter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .768-6967, cschroeder@communitypress.comMelanie Laughman Sports Editor . . . . . . .768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com Scott Springer Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . .576-8255, sspringer@communitypress.com

    Twitter: @sspringersports

    AdvertisingTo place an ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513-768-8404,

    EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

    DeliveryFor customer service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .576-8240 Stephen Barraco

    Circulation Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .248-7110, sbarraco@communitypress.com Pam McAlister District Manager. . . . . . . . .248-7136, pmcalister@communitypress.com

    ClassifiedTo place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242-4000, www.communityclassified.com

    Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms

    To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

    Find news and information from your community on the WebCincinnati.com/communities

    Calendar ..............8AClassifieds ..............CFood ...................9APolice .................. 7BSchools ................7ASports ..................1BViewpoints .........10A

    Index

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    Drive will, as in pastyears, conduct services atthree places at the follow-ing times on Monday, May30:

    9:30 a.m. at MemorialPark at the corner of Mainand Sycamore streets.

    10 a.m. at GreenlawnCemetery at 687 U.S.Route 50.

    10:30 a.m. at St. An-drew Cemetery on SouthMilford Road.

    Chandler said hedoesnt know how manyyears American LegionVictor Stier Post 450 hasbeen sponsoring the Me-morial Day parade in Mil-ford.

    The bad part aboutthis is that there arentany guys around who cananswer that question any-more, Chandler said.

    They were all WorldWar I and World War IIguys and almost all of

    them are gone.Ive been involved in

    the last 60 years exceptfor two years when I wasin the service, Chandlersaid.

    Chandler said Ameri-can Legion Victor StierPost 450 plans to concen-trate its efforts on othercommunity-service pro-jects.

    Milford Mayor LaurieHowland said it is under-standable that the Ameri-can Legion post is bowingout of the Memorial Dayparade this year.

    The parade and thedesire for the communityto honor those who havemade the ultimate sacri-fice is a well-honored tra-dition in the city. Unfortu-nately, such events take alot of support and volun-teers to pull off, How-land said.

    Too often such eventsand the effort behindthem are not fully real-ized till they no longerhappen. The parade is anexample of the ideology

    that it takes a community.Hopefully, moving

    forward the communitycan find another way topay tribute to the men andwomen who gave theirlives for our country,Howland said.

    The redevelopment ofMemorial Park is one wayto show that respect.

    Milford won a $69,000federal grant to upgradeMemorial Park and plansto use some of the moneyto build five granite mon-uments honoring veter-ans on a landscaped plazathere.

    The city also will usethe community develop-ment block grant fundsfor improvements that in-clude providing accessfor disabled people to thepark and a walkway fromthe plaza to RiversidePark on Water Street nearAmerican Legion VictorStier Post 450.

    Want to know moreabout what is happeningin Milford? Follow me onTwitter @jeannehouck.

    ParadeContinued from Page 1A

    asked if they even heardof this diagnosis. Zerohands went up whenasked if they knew ofanybody diagnosed.

    I have only heard ofone person in the entireworld who had the samediagnosis, Bright said.I heard of her early on.I have no idea where sheis, or if shes even stillaround.

    Rather than chasethat down, Bright util-ized her energy for herown survival. The firstoncologist she saw of-fered only one para-graph of information hefound online. Her sisterworks for the FDA andhad connections withinthat organization and theNational Cancer In-stitute. She called on allher friends.

    She got me in touchwith the best uterinesarcoma doctors in theworld, said Bright.

    That led her to M.D.Anderson Cancer Centerin Houston, where theywanted her to stay fortreatments. A wife andmother of two boys, 11and 13, living in Love-land was not going toHouston for treatments.Next was MemorialSloan Kettering in NewYork City. Again, theywanted her there for the

    treatments. Her sisterfound the Sarcoma Alli-ance. Dr. Larry Copelandof Ohio State was a high-ly recommended mem-ber of the alliance.

    We decided to gothere, Bright said. Wemet him and we bothagreed he was the rightperson for me.

    Between the Julydiagnosis and the scanfor the chemo treat-ments, she went fromone metastatic nodule inher lung, to four. Shewas already doing lots ofalternative treatmentsincluding affirmations,visualizations, praying,and people praying forher; everything sheknew about and a strictdiet. A blood drawshowed her albumen (ameasure of nutritionalstatus) to be 4.2. Above3.5 is good, below 2.5 isusually a poor prognosisfor someone with cancer.

    I already had a verygood nutritional statusand here I was withend-stage cancer, shesaid. So I knew diet wasnot going to save mylife.

    Bright says it abso-lutely did contribute toher healing and survival,but not without medicaltreatment. She went upto Columbus for chemotreatments every twoweeks for 16 treatments.After that round of che-mo, there was still onetumor growing. Shebegan a new differenttype of chemo treatmentwhich lasted eight

    months. The remainingtumor died, but a newtumor was growing. Shedecided to have it surgi-cally removed and test-ed.

    She had the lung sur-gery, followed by chemo-therapy, which requiredthree to five-day hospitalstays every three weeks.Copeland referred her toDr. James Pavelka at St.Elizabeth in Edgewood,Kentucky, so she couldstay closer to home.After six treatments ascan showed a one-halfinch nodule on the pul-monary vein right nextto her heart.

    Despite concerns ofher oncologist, the sur-geon who performed herlung surgery was confi-dent of success. In themidst of all that, Brightand her husband agreedtheir marriage was over.She moved out, stayed

    with friends and evenslept on floors. Fiveweeks later she had thesurgery. The tumor hadalready grown from ahalf-inch to 2 1/2 inches.Bright did not want toknow the prognosis.

    They didnt tell me,but it was pretty clearthat I was in trouble,Bright said. There wereseveral times when Iprepared to die. Thestuff was growing, whatcould I do?

    Six weeks later, at apost-op meeting, she wastold how big the tumorhad been and to get backon chemo. With no che-mo options left, Brightwas told get ready forhospice.

    My next scan wasclean, Bright said. Itwas 25 months from thetime I was diagnosed tothe surgery. Threemonths later I had a scanand it was clean.

    Throughout those twoyears Bright had beenwriting on a CaringBridge blog created forher at the beginning.People who read it en-couraged her to write abook. Learning all alongthe way, she had greatsupport and personaldetermination to sur-vive. A book sharing herrecipe for survival andhealing is the naturaloutgrowth from herexperience.

    It was seven years ofhell, she said. I feellike Im on the other sidenow.

    The other side has

    revealed a will to sharehope, healing and sur-vival. Bright saidThriver Soup willteach the ABCs atti-tudes, behavior, andchoices for readers tolearn there is hope. Thebook offers tested tips toreduce the impact ofchemotherapy, get out ofthe hospital earlier, re-cover faster, managefear, relieve stress, andavoid scams. Her book isfilled with a message ofhealing and hope forthose trying to survivecancer.

    I like being alive,she said. Im just get-ting started. Ive got toget this out there. I wantto give people strengthand hope.

    National Cancer Sur-vivors Day is Saturday,June 5

    Alive and well, HeidiBright has been in rad-ical remission since 2011.

    She received the 2014Voices of Women awardfor outstanding personalgrowth and transforma-tion from CincinnatisWhole Living Journalmagazine.

    She speaks to groupsregularly and is avail-able as a guest for radioand television.

    Her book ThriverSoup is published bySunstone Press.

    Contact Heidi andlearn more at www.thri-versoup.com.

    BookContinued from Page 1A

    THANKS TO HEIDI BRIGHT

    Book cover of ThriverSoup written by cancersurvivor Heidi Bright.

    PLEASE RECYCLETHIS NEWSPAPER.

  • MAY 25, 2016 LOVELAND HERALD 3ANEWS

    THURSDAY, JUNE 2 11 AM - 1 PMOASIS CONFERENCE CENTER

    902 Loveland-Miamiville Road, Loveland OH 45140

    Reserve Your Seat Today!$35 Chamber Members | $40 Non-Chamber Members

    Register at LMRChamberAlliance.org

    This event is focused on giving women professionals tips and ideas on how to better balance their lives. It is also a great way to network with area women!

    JENN JORDANKeynote Speaker, Co-Host, JeQ and Jenn Morning Show on Q102

    KARRIE HELMEmcee, Regional Director, Evereve

    Shopping Expo Luncheon Makeovers Networking Swag Bags Prizes

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    Heroes and Villainson stageSeveral Loveland and Milfordchildren are in Acting UpsBroadway musical revue He-roes & Villians at MechanicStreet Theater, Lebanon Thea-tre Company , 10 S. MechanicSt., Lebanon.

    Performance times are 8 p.m.June 3, 4, 9 and 10, and 2 p.m.June 5 and 12.

    For tickets and information, goto www.actingup.com.

    Cast members from Lovelandinclude: Cole Hankins, FrankieHaas, Abby Hickey and Brigh-ton Hummer.

    Cast members from Milfordinclude: Amanda Bauer, ConnorHart, Ellen Long and AlexaMueller.

    Movie Nightin the ParkSymmes Township will showStar Wars: The Force Awak-ens at its Movie Night in thePark Friday, June 17, at Homeof the Brave Park. Showtimewill be at about 9 p.m.

    For more information, contactthe township office at 513-683-6644.

    Get rid ofprescriptions drugsat drop boxesthroughout thecountyClermont County has a numberof permanent prescription drugdrop box locations throughoutthe county.

    Its important to dispose ofmedications in the home thathave expired, or are no longerused, said Karen Scherra,Executive Director of the Cler-mont County Mental Health &Recovery Board. Its especiallyimportant to get rid of opioidpain medications, because ofthe possibility for misuse,overdose, and even addiction.You dont want anyone in thehome experimenting withthese drugs.

    Those who want to dispose ofmedications can bring them toone of these locations:

    Amelia Police Department, 44W. Main St., Amelia, 513-753-4747;

    Batavia Community Pharmacy,2234 Bauer Road, Batavia,

    513-732-0356;Bethel Police Department, 120 N.Main St. No. 2, Bethel, 513-734-2256;

    Clermont County Sheriffs De-partment, 4470 Ohio 222,Batavia, 513-732-7500;

    Goshen Township Police Depart-ment, 6757 Goshen Road,Goshen, 513-722-3200;

    Pierce Township Police Depart-ment, 950 Locust Corner Road,Cincinnati, 513-752-4100.

    MHRB boardmeets June 13Clermont County Mental Healthand Recovery Boards monthlymeeting is at 7 p.m. Monday,June 13, at 2337 ClermontCenter Drive, Batavia.

    Free Shred Dayset on June 11Clermont County Records Centerwill host a free communityShred Day from 9 a.m. to noonSaturday, June 11, in the park-ing lot of the Department ofJob & Family Services, 2400Clermont Center Drive. Lastyear, 3,000 pounds of paperwas shredded during this event.

    Trustees seeking tofill vacancies on twocommitteesThe Symmes Township Board ofTrustees is seeking to fill posi-tions on the Zoning Commis-sion and the Finance & AuditCommittee.

    Residents interested in applyingfor one of these appointmentsshould contact the townshipoffice at 513-683-6644 to re-quest an application or down-load a copy from the townshipswebsite at www.symmestownship.org/resources. SelectForms & Applications.

    The application should then befilled out and returned as soonas possible to Symmes Town-ship at 9323 Union CemeteryRoad, Symmes Township, Ohio45140-9312. Also, the applica-tion may be scanned ande-mailed tolfelter@symmestownship.org.

    The Board of Trustees will con-duct interviews in June.

    For more information, contactthe township office at 513-683-6644.

    Free social plannedfor dogsAre you looking for somethingfun for your dog to do thissummer?

    Symmes Township is offering afree dog social on the firstThursday of every monthbeginning June 2 at Symmes

    Park, 11600 Lebanon Road,from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 pm. Theevent will be at the Bark Park.

    For more information, call thetownship office at 683-6644.

    Township offeringfree yoga classesthis summer

    Symmes Township will offer freeyoga classes twice a week thissummer at Hopewell MeadowsPark, 9131 Hopewell Road. Nomatter what your age or levelof physical health, yoga canhelp you relax, reduce the stressin your life and make you moreflexible and fit. No experienceis necessary.

    The classes will be 6:30 p.m. to7:30 p.m. Wednesdays begin-ning June 1 and 9 a.m. to 10a.m. Saturdays beginning June4.

    For more information, call thetownship office at 513-683-6644.

    BRIEFLY

    As the 2015-2016 schoolyear comes to a close inMay, Community Press in-vites high schools to sharegraduation lists.

    We would like to pub-lish your schools list ofgraduates, along with thenames and photos of thevaledictorian and saluta-torian.

    Lists should be sent asunformatted MicroSoftWord documents, or assimple text.

    Please do not send pdfsor Excel spreadsheets.

    All lists will be postedat Cincinnati.com.

    Print publication de-pends on available space.We do not guarantee alllists will run in print.

    Photos are encour-aged, too. Please send JPGphotos at least 500 kilo-bytes in size (usually thephoto that comes out ofthe digital camera worksbest) as well as a captionfor each photo givingnames of those in the pho-to and description ofwhats happening.

    Questions? Call 248-7134.

    Send us high schoolgraduation lists

    FILE PHOTO

    CommunityPress inviteslocal highschools toshare theirgraduationlists.

  • 4A LOVELAND HERALD MAY 25, 2016 NEWS

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    When it comes to raisingfunds for local teens, SoutheastCincinnati Young Life puts on aBeast of an event.

    The Beast of the East Forkadventure race returns to EastFork State Park Saturday, June4, for its second year. The 5Kcourse takes participants on aseries of natural and man-madeobstacles. This years eventpromises to be bigger and bet-ter, race and Young Life Direc-tor Shawn Kuhn said.

    The 5K is Kuhns brainchild.He was looking for a way toraise funds to help send theYoung Life teen members tosummer camp.

    Young Life is what we call aparachurch ministry, Kuhnsaid. Its similar to Fellowshipof Christian Athletes, or Cam-pus Crusade, those types of or-ganizations.

    Its not directly affiliatedwith any specific church or or-ganization. Because its a Chris-tian organization, it has no offi-cial affiliation with publicschools. Its a peer-to-peergroup with meetings held in thehomes of the student members.

    Young Life locally servesstudents in Forest Hills, WestClermont, New Richmond andBatavia schools. Volunteers in-vest hundreds of hours annuallybefriending and mentoringteens. The big event each yearis a one week trip to one ofYoung Lifes summer campproperties.

    The last four years SoutheastCincinnati Young Life has allo-cated $60,000 to assist 350 localstudents cover the cost of camp.Part of Kuhns job, in addition tobeing the Young Life leader forAnderson High School students,is to raise funds to support thecamp and other Young Life pro-

    grams. In past years, the major-ity of the money used to sendkids to camp was from the oper-ating budget, money Kuhnraised throughout the year.

    The Beast event is an effortto establish a fund raiser where100 percent of the profits areused to send the students to oneof Young Lifes many summercamps.

    We had a really greatevent, Kuhn said of the Beastsinaugural year. About 175 peo-ple ran last year. I was pleasant-ly surprised by that. With regis-tration and corporate sponsors,we netted $6,000 toward sum-mer camp. So this year we arehoping for more runners. Ourgoal is to have 250 to run thisyear.

    With an increase in partici-pants and corporate sponsors,coupled with a decrease in over-head costs with many of the ob-

    stacles constructed last year,Kuhn said hes hopeful of rais-ing $10,000 this year.

    To raise that money, Kuhnsaid he and his fellow YoungLife members are working hardto deliver an event that appealsto a variety of people, from ath-letes looking for a challenge tofamilies looking for a fun out-ing.

    For hardcore athletes whowant to get their 5K time, therewill be a chipped timing option.

    To help make the event morefamily-friendly, a Little Beastobstacle course was added. Forchildren from around ages 3 to9, the course will be completelyfree and provide small versionsof the big Beasts obstacles,

    Were using it as a way tomake sure that our event is real-ly family oriented and inclu-sive, Kuhn said. Certainly I

    want to attract a hardcore ath-lete who will run and find itchallenging. Were really tryingto create a course thats chal-lenging.

    Last year there were partici-pants who finished the course in

    20 minutes, and others whowent through as a family andmaybe took up to an hour.

    When the race is over, theday continues with refresh-ments, raffle prizes, inflatablesand music.

    Beastly 5K run benefits local teens

    PROVIDED

    Mud covered hills, slippery slopes and steep ravines are just a few of the obstacles participants will find at thisyear's Beast of the East Fork 5K.

    Sheila A. Vilvenssvilvens@communitypress.com IF YOURE GOING TO

    BEAST OF THE EASTFORK

    Beast of the East Fork 5Kreturns to East Fork State Park,3294 Elklick Road, Bethel, Sat-urday, June 4. Check-in andwalk-up registration begins at 9a.m. Race heats begin at 10 a.m.

    Cost is $55 (chip-timed); $50(without chip). Groups of five ormore can save $50. Registrationincludes race entry, t-shirt, mealticket, and raffle entry. Onehundred percent of the pro-ceeds support work with localteen-agers.

    For information about Beastof the East or online race regis-tration, visitwww.beastoftheeastfork.com.For information about YoungLife and its camps,www.younglife.org.

    PROVIDED

    Trudging through thesandy beach,participants of lastyear's Beast of theEast Fork 5K celebratecompletion of theobstacle course.

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    The battle against drugabuse in Clermont Countygets a boost with the addi-tion of a few more pre-

    scription drug dropoffboxes.

    The Clermont CountyMental Health and Recov-ery Board received agrant from Interact forHealth in Cincinnati tobuy and install prescrip-

    tion drug drop off boxes atthe Amelia Police Depart-ment, Loveland Police De-partment, Batavia Com-munity Pharmacy and Mi-ami Township Police De-partment, injuryprevention coordinator at

    Clermont County PublicHealth Michelle Lyden-berg said. The new boxesare in place and are in ad-dition to previously avail-able prescription dropoffboxes in the Pierce Town-ship Police Department,

    Clermont County Sher-iffs Department office,Goshen Police Depart-ment and the Village ofBethel Police Depart-ment.

    The drop off boxes areone piece of a very largeplan the Opiate TaskForce has to address opi-ates, heroin and prescrip-tion drug abuse, Lyden-berg said.

    We see this as onepiece of reducing the sup-ply, she said. For many,the path to heroin addic-tion can be traced back toprescription drug abuse.Some young people startwith prescription drugsthey find in the medicinecabinet at home or of fam-ily members.

    By providing properdisposal locations for un-used prescription drugs,Clermont County is hop-ing to break this cycle. InClermont County, partici-pation in efforts to pro-vide residents with a wayto properly dispose of pre-scription drugs started in2010 with a Drug TakeBack Day. Participation

    exceeded expectations,Clermont County MentalHealth and RecoveryBoard Executive DirectorKaren J. Scherra said.

    It was amazing howmany came out, she said.The Drug Take Backevent held last Septemberresulted in nearly 200pounds of medications be-ing collected in ClermontCounty.

    The first permanentdrop box was in PierceTownship at the Police De-partment and was in-stalled in June 2012,Scherra said. The one atthe Sheriffs Officeopened next.

    The drug dropoff box-es are an important partof stopping young peoplebefore they start abusingprescription drugs, Ly-denberg said. They pro-vide a convenient way todispose of potentially ad-dictive and deadly drugskeeping them away fromchildren, out of the gar-bage, away from wildlifeand out of the water sup-ply.

    Clermont adds moreprescription drug drop off sitesSheila A. Vilvenssvilvens@communitypress.com

    PROVIDED

    Thanks to agrant,ClermontCounty has afew moreprescriptiondrug drop offboxes.

  • K1 MAY 25, 2016 LOVELAND HERALD 7A

    SCHOOLSSCHOOLSACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS CommunityPress.com

    LOVELANDHERALDEditor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

    Loveland EarlyChildhood Center

    It was a science assemblythat went back in history...wayback in history.

    Loveland EarlyChildhoodCenter students enjoyed TheDinosaur Diary Wednesday,May 4. The PTA-sponsoredevent was part of the annual Sci-ence Day.

    The day was full of learningand hands-on experiments,Principal Kyle Bush said. Iwant to send out a huge thankyou to our PTA and the volun-teers who made this possible. Itwas fun for all.

    Loveland High School Loveland High School is

    proving that technology im-proves the teaching and learn-ing experience and allowsteachers and students to domore inside and outside of theclassroom.

    With the 2015-2016 schoolyear, Loveland High School re-fined its bring your own de-vice structure as it evolves intoa 1:1 learning environment fornext school year with manyteachers integrating technol-ogy into classroom instructionalmost daily, and students hav-ing the ability to take their de-vice outside the building tolearn.

    The bottom line is that tech-nology allows teachers and stu-dents to do things in the class-room never before possiblefrom the teaching and learningperspective, said DavidKnapp, district director of tech-nology. Our continued growthand ability to access technologyallows teachers to focus on theindividual needs of each of ourstudents, and continue theteaching even when studentsleave the classroom.

    The immediate feedbackthat Math XL delivers to the stu-dents has been extremely bene-ficial, teacher Katie Byrkettsaid. Students have tools with-in the program to give them im-mediate help and allows themthe practice they need to under-stand the math concepts.

    Additionally, Google Sheetshave allowed my students toshare data and run basic statis-tics much quicker, which allowsthem more time to analyze thedata. It also offers a location tostore the data if we need it forthe next day. Google Classroomnot only allows students to col-laborate amongst themselves, italso allows me to manage andparticipate in the collaboration even to the point of recordingverbal feedback.

    Screencasting, or recordingan audio presentation withscreenshots, has allowed me tobe present in the classroom,even when I am not, teacherJen Dell said. I know there arelots of videos available to stu-dents on different topics, but Ifeel like when they hear myvoice and know I am the one be-hind the screencasts, they aremore engaged in the lesson. Italso allows students to go backand revisit material at their ownpace.

    Katie and Jen are teacherswho put student achievement atthe heart of their lessons, inno-vative instructional coach Bri-

    an Conatser said. Each usesbest practice instructionalstrategies that challenge andencourage their students to ex-cel. By being an active partici-pant in each students educa-tion, Katie and Jen meet stu-dents where they are and em-bed engaging lessons utilizingtechnology to enhance thelearning process.

    Loveland Schools The week of May 2-6 ad-

    ministrators, staff, students,parents and volunteers showedtheir appreciation for Lovelandteachers during the annualTeacher Appreciation Week.

    As a parent I truly appreci-ate the teachers who work withmy children each day, Love-land Superintendent Chad Hil-liker said. The time and pa-tience it takes to do what is bestfor students is no easy task, butit is very rewarding. I wouldlike to extend my appreciationto our teachers for their dedica-tion to our children.

    Across the district, giftswere presented and messagesof thanks delivered often witha theme.

    Loveland Primary Schoolfollowed the childrens book se-ries by Laura Nomeroff (authorof If You Give a Mouse a Cook-ie) and used a different bookeach day to say thank you.

    We ended the festivities Fri-day with our annual PTA staffappreciation luncheon and de-livered individual, handwrittenthank you cards to the staff,Principal Kevin Fancher said.

    At Loveland Early ChildhoodCenter, teachers discoveredtreats each day in the staff workroom, and enjoyed their PTAluncheon Thursday, May 12.

    This is such a tremendousway to show appreciation forwhat our teachers do, Princi-pal Kyle Bush said. Parents do-nate gift cards so that each staffmember gets some sort ofprize to take home, in addition

    to the very nice lunch. We reallyappreciate the show of supportfor our teachers; it is very muchdeserved.

    Moeller High School The Art and Design De-

    partment has been awarded$3.08 million in total collectivescholarship offers for 2016.

    Its little wonder as the de-partments success in securingscholarships has been signifi-cant for more than a decade.

    Archbishop Moeller HighSchool Art/Photography De-partment since 2002 has en-abled students on average toearn more than $2.5 million inscholarships annually. Gradu-ates are accepted into topranked art and design programsacross the country, said Jac-quelyn Sommer, departmentchair.

    The Art/Photography andDesign Department has theability to work one on one withstudents continually craftingand developing a program thatpositions them to go into anycreative field. Current facultyhave received multiple honorsand awards in design and educa-tion, she said.

    Department faculty holdboard positions with the ArtAcademy of Cincinnati (Jacque-lyn Sommer) and the Ohio ArtEducation Association (GregStanforth) .

    There are 10 students in the2016 Advanced Placement Stu-dio Art and Design 4 class.

    This is achieved by a com-mitment to the following:

    Drawing: The foundation ofany program of excellence inthe visual arts.

    Sketchbook: The most impor-tant tool of the visual artist -- thestudents visual diary.

    The Elements of Art and thePrinciples of Design: The alpha-bet and grammar the struc-ture of the visual arts.

    Verbal Communication: Stu-dents become conversant about

    their own and the visual art ofothers. They will learn specificlanguage common to the artscommunity in order to carry onan intelligent and relevant con-versation with an art profes-sional.

    Work ethic: Students becomedisciplined artists creatingworks of art that clearly reflecttheir thoughts, feelings and in-tentions.

    The advanced placementstudio art and design course forseniors is designed for thosewho have completed all previ-ous studio art and designcourses and intend to pursue ca-reers in the field of art and de-sign, Stanforth said.

    Ursuline Academy At Ursulines annual Aca-

    demic Awards, the studentswith the three highest gradepoint averages and thoseawarded the Christian Leader-ship awards, were recognizedfrom the freshman, sophomoreand junior classes.

    The students with the threehighest GPAs in the junior classare Claudia Johnson 17 ofSpringfield Township, AbigailKlare 17 of Symmes Townshipand Sara Rani Reddy 17 of Indi-an Hill.

    The students with the three

    highest GPAs in the sophomoreclass are Lynn Ahrens 18 ofBlue Ash, Olivia Mihelick 18 ofMason and Sydney Robinson 18of Loveland.

    The students with the threehighest GPAs in the freshmanclass are Julia Herriott 19 ofMiami Township, Maria Spaeth19 of Reading and Natalie Willi-ford 19 of Sycamore Township.

    Also at the ceremony, Ursu-line recognized students receiv-ing The Christian LeadershipAward. The Christian Leader-ship Award is given every yearto a student in each class whodemonstrates Gospel values inher personal and in her schoolcommunity life. Some of thesevalues are: care, concern andcompassion for others, honesty,faith, hope, integrity. This stu-dent, by her love and willing-ness to include others, takes ev-ery person seriously, just as Je-sus did. Because of these val-ues, she is recognized as aleader by her classmates. Thisaward is given by peer nomina-tion and is awarded by peervote.

    The recipients of this yearsChristian Leadership Awardare Sara Rani Reddy 17 of Indi-an Hill, Fatima Khan 18 of Ma-son and Madison Niceley 19 ofHamilton Township.

    SCHOOLS NOTEBOOK

    THANKS TO TERESA MEYER

    Moeller High School students who have won art scholarships, from left, front, Daniel Hopkins, Brandon Lutts; Jack Buehler , Joseph Burns, BenjaminTreinen and Nicholas Schaffer; back, Hunter Elmore, Roger Chanin and Max Adarve. Not pictured, Walter (Trey) McBride.

    THANKS TO SALLY NEIDHARD

    Ursuline Class of 2018 Christian Leadership Award recipient Fatima Khan(Mason) and Class of 2018 three highest GPAs Lynn Ahrens (Blue Ash),Olivia Mihelick (Mason) and Sydney Robinson (Loveland).

    THANKS TO HEATHER HIGDON

    Loveland Early Childhood Center students Will Powers and Lilly Thornberryenjoy center-stage experience during the May 4 assembly.

    THANKS TO HEATHER HIGDON

    Loveland High School teacher Jen Dell utilizes best practices to providecollaborative spaces that challenge students to achieve math skills throughthe use of technology.

  • Call us today! (513) 712-9660PAINFREEGETBACKTOLIVING

    8A LOVELAND HERALD MAY 25, 2016 K1

    THURSDAY, MAY 26Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, 7010Miami Ave., Check websitecalendar for details. $10 percreator. Add $5 for drop off ofages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Beginner/Intermediate Water-color with Chris Campbell,9:30 a.m. to noon, Womens ArtClub Cultural Center, 6980 Cam-bridge Ave., The Barn. Learnabout saving whites, experimentwith different papers, createtextures, reflections and shadows,negative painting, glazing andmore. Ages 18 and up. $25 perclass; $20 with own materials.Registration required. Presentedby Womans Art Club CulturalCenter. 272-3700; www.artatthe-barn.org. Mariemont.

    Art ExhibitsBeing BOLD: Exhibit by Studio7C Artworks at The Barn, 10a.m. to 2 p.m., Womens Art ClubCultural Center, 6980 CambridgeAve., The Barn. 6 local artists willbe exhibiting unique, originalartwork: Debbie Davis, DonnaGrafe, Lindsay Rorick, MelanieSheridan, Marie Smith and DougWelsh. Through May 29. Free.Presented by Womans Art ClubCultural Center. 272-3700;www.artatthebarn.org. Marie-mont.

    Cooking ClassesSummer Appetizers withKaren Harmon, 6:30-9 p.m.,Cooks Wares, 11344 MontgomeryRoad, $52. Reservations required.489-6400; www.cookswaresonli-ne.com. Symmes Township.

    Farmers MarketMadeira Farmers Market, 3:30-7p.m., City of Madeira, Madeira,Intersection of Dawson andMiami. Wide variety of locallyand sustainably grown foods,made-from-scratch goodies andvarious artisan products. Present-ed by Madeira Farmers Market.623-8058; www.madeirafarmers-market.com. Madeira.

    FilmsMovie Nite at The Barn: Herb &Dorothy, 6:30 p.m., Womens ArtClub Cultural Center, 6980 Cam-bridge Ave., The Barn. Feel-goodfilm tells story of 2 NYC artcollectors. Artist and educatorDave Laug hosts. Light refresh-ments. Ages 18 and up. Free.Registration recommended.Presented by Womans Art ClubCultural Center. 272-3700;www.artatthebarn.org. Marie-mont.

    Literary - LibrariesTeen Writing Club, 6 p.m.,Loveland Branch Library, 649Loveland-Madeira Road, For teenwriters interested in meetingother teen writers or looking forfeedback from others. Ages 12-17.Free. 369-4476; www.cincinnati-library.org. Loveland.

    Music - Singer-SongwriterWill Hoge, 2 p.m., Plaid RoomRecords, 120 Karl Brown Way,With Jason White. Free. 292-4219;plaidroomrecords.blogspot.com.Loveland.

    Support GroupsCancer Survivors Group, 6:30-8p.m.,Cancer Support Community,4918 Cooper Road, Living Room.Group gives place to talk throughexperiences with other survivorsand focus on ongoing recoveryfrom cancer after treatment ends.Ages 18 and up. Free. 791-4060;cancersupportcincinnati.org. BlueAsh.

    FRIDAY, MAY 27Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Flower Bar Friday, 7-9 p.m., TheMarmalade Lily, 9850 Schlottman

    Road, Event Barn. Receive bucketof flowers to create and designfresh table arrangement, flowercrown, bouquet, and more.Cupcakes by A Spoon Fulla Sugar.$45. Registration required. Pre-sented by The Marmalade Lily,Inc.. 604-6561; www.themarmala-delily.com. Loveland.

    Dining EventsFriday Night Grillouts, 5-8 p.m.Ronnie Vaughn, Lake Isabella,10174 Loveland-Madeira Road,Items available a la carte. Dine onoutdoor covered patio by thelake or in air-conditioned ChartRoom. Live music. $10, $8.50,$4.25 for children ages 10 andunder. Presented by Great Parksof Hamilton County. 521-7275;www.greatparks.org. SymmesTownship.

    SATURDAY, MAY 28Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 2 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Art ExhibitsBeing BOLD: Exhibit by Studio7C Artworks at The Barn, 1-4p.m., Womens Art Club CulturalCenter, Free. 272-3700; www.ar-tatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

    Farmers MarketMontgomery Farmers Market,9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., MontgomeryElementary School, 9609 Montgo-mery Road, Parking lot. Roughly30 vendors with fresh produce,artisan foods, locally-roastedcoffee, handmade fresh breadand baked goods, local bisonmeat, chicken, beef, sausage,olive oil, music and more. Free.Presented by MontgomeryFarmers Market. Through Oct. 29.560-5064; montgomeryfarmers-market.org. Montgomery.

    Health / WellnessLifestyle Weight Loss Classes,2:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., PeachysHealth Smart, 7400 MontgomeryRoad, Program benefits individ-uals needing assistance in weightloss to prevent or reverse itsnegative consequences. Ages 21and up. Free. Reservations re-quired. 315-3943; peachyshealth-smart.com. Silverton.

    Literary - CraftsKids Start Your Own Quilt WithFelt, 11 a.m., Loveland BranchLibrary, 649 Loveland-MadeiraRoad, Decorate felt squares andpiece them together to makequilt. Free. 369-4476; www.cincin-natilibrary.org. Loveland.

    Music - AcousticString Theory, 8-11 p.m., DeerPark Municipal Building, 7777Blue Ash Road, Bring chair.Coolers permitted. Free. Present-ed by City of Deer Park. 794-8860.Deer Park.

    ToursCincy Wine Wagon WineryTour, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mag-gianos Little Italy, 7875 Montgo-mery Road, Bar. Visit ValleyVineyards, Henke Winery andMeier Wine Cellar. Approximately5-hour tour. Wine and snacks ateach location. Ages 21 and up.$65. Reservations required.Presented by Cincy Wine Wagon.258-7909; www.cincybrew-bus.com. Sycamore Township.

    SUNDAY, MAY 29Art ExhibitsBeing BOLD: Exhibit by Studio7C Artworks at The Barn, 1-4p.m., Womens Art Club CulturalCenter, Free. 272-3700; www.ar-tatthebarn.org. Mariemont.

    MONDAY, MAY 30Holiday - Memorial DayMemorial Day Open House, 10a.m. to 2 p.m., Tufts SchildmeyerFuneral Home and CremationCenter, 129 N. Riverside Ave., Freefood and drinks, music and freegiveaways. View military memo-

    rabilia in museum-like setting,military vehicles, military moviesand get information aboutveterans benefits and HonorFlight. 683-2430; www.tuftsschild-meyer.com. Loveland.

    Music - ClassicalBlue Ash Montgomery Sym-phony Orchestra, 6-8 p.m., BlueAsh Towne Square, Cooper andHunt roads, American Gifts istheme for Memorial Day concert.Features works of Hector Berlioz,Aaron Copland and Cincinnatisown Frank Proto. (Rain Site:Sycamore Junior High, 5757Cooper Road). Free. Presented byBlue Ash/Montgomery SymphonyOrchestra. 549-2197; bamso.org.Blue Ash.

    TUESDAY, MAY 31Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Farmers MarketLoveland Farmers Market, 3-7p.m., Loveland Farmers Market,205 Broadway, 683-0491;www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

    Literary - LibrariesTeen Club, 3:30-5 p.m., Deer ParkBranch Library, 3970 E. GalbraithRoad, Teens have fun with simplescience experiments, play boardgames, participate in make &take activities, crafts and otherengaging activities. Ages 10-18.Free. 369-4450; www.cincin-natilibrary.org/branches/deer-park. Deer Park.

    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Farmers MarketFarmers Market, 3:30-7 p.m.,Blue Ash Summit Park, 4335Glendale-Milford Road, Variety offood and products from localvendors. Free. Presented by Cityof Blue Ash. 745-8550;www.blueash.com. Blue Ash.

    ShoppingFair Trade Oriental Rug Event,10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Ten ThousandVillages Harpers Point, 11316Montgomery Road, Features over300 exquisitely beautiful rugs.Tribal, Bokhara and Persian,classic to contemporary in varietyof sizes. All rugs are handmadeby fairly paid adults in Pakistan.Benefits Bunyaad. Free. 802-5721;bit.ly/1S0ppXh. Symmes Town-ship.

    THURSDAY, JUNE 2Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Beginner/Intermediate Water-color with Chris Campbell,9:30 a.m. to noon, Womens ArtClub Cultural Center, $25 perclass; $20 with own materials.Registration required. 272-3700;www.artatthebarn.org. Marie-mont.

    Business SeminarsIntroduction to Social MediaBy Dimalanta Design Group,10 a.m., Dimalanta Design Group,4555 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 650,Learn to further skills in socialmedia marketing. Free. Regis-tration recommended. Presentedby Ernie Dimalanta. 588-2802;bit.ly/1JuPLZ8. Blue Ash.

    Cooking ClassesSalads that Make a Meal withMarilyn Harris, 6:30-9 p.m.,Cooks Wares, 11344 MontgomeryRoad, $62. Reservations required.489-6400; www.cookswaresonli-ne.com. Symmes Township.

    Dining EventsFamily Ice Cream Social, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Mayerson JCC, 8485Ridge Road, Outdoor games,bounce house, giant slide andpetting zoo. Pizza dinner andkosher ice cream from MissMissys Ice Cream Truck availablefor purchase. Free. 761-7500.Amberley Village.

    Farmers MarketMadeira Farmers Market, 3:30-7p.m., City of Madeira, 623-8058;www.madeirafarmersmarket-.com. Madeira.

    ShoppingFair Trade Oriental Rug Event,10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Introduction toOriental Rugs at 7 p.m. Thiseducational presentation is freeto attend but must RSVP at513-871-5840., Ten ThousandVillages Harpers Point, Free.802-5721; bit.ly/1S0ppXh. SymmesTownship.

    Support GroupsBlood Cancer NetworkingGroup, 6:30-7:30 p.m., CancerSupport Community, 4918 CooperRoad, This networking groupbrings together people copingwith blood cancers and issuesrelated to treatment and survi-vorship. Open to both peoplewith cancer and their loved ones.Ages 18 and up. Free. 791-4060;www.cancersupportcincinna-ti.org. Blue Ash.

    FRIDAY, JUNE 3Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 3 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Dining EventsFriday Night Grillouts, 5-8 p.m.Katie Pritchard, Lake Isabella, $10,$8.50, $4.25 for children ages 10and under. 521-7275; www.great-parks.org. Symmes Township.

    Music - AcousticString Theory, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.,Silverton Cafe, 7201 MontgomeryRoad, $5. 791-2922; www.silver-toncafe.com. Silverton.

    ShoppingFair Trade Oriental Rug Event,10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Ten ThousandVillages Harpers Point, Free.802-5721; bit.ly/1S0ppXh. SymmesTownship.

    Quilt Outreach Fabric Sale, 9a.m. to 2 p.m., Quilt Outreach,7859 Carmago Road, Fundraisingyard sale for quilting group.Benefits Quilt Outreach. Free.Presented by Quilt Outreach, Inc..607-6569; quiltoutreach.com.Madeira.

    SATURDAY, JUNE 4Art & Craft ClassesCreativities Open Studio, 10a.m. to 2 p.m., Creativities, $10per creator. Add $5 for drop offof ages 7-11. 272-1500; www.art-

    sandcreativities.com. Madeira.

    Cooking ClassesKids Making Breakfast withIlene Ross, 1-3 p.m., CooksWares, 11344 Montgomery Road,$38. Reservations required.489-6400; www.cookswaresonli-ne.com. Symmes Township.

    Literary - LibrariesTeen Craft, 3 p.m., LovelandBranch Library, 649 Loveland-Madeira Road, Make sparkly lipgloss and sugar scrubs to helprelax and beautify. Ages 12-17.Free. 369-4476; www.cincinnati-library.org. Loveland.

    RecreationMontgomery Kiwanis FishingContest, 9-11 a.m., Swaim Park,Zig Zag and Cooper roads, Forchildren aged 1-15 (three agegroups). Cash prizes for first childin each age group to catch fisheach half hour. Final cash prizesfor most fish, biggest fish andsmallest fish. Free. Presented byMontgomery Kiwanis Club.910-7068. Montgomery.

    ShoppingFair Trade Oriental Rug Event,10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Ten ThousandVillages Harpers Point, Free.802-5721; bit.ly/1S0ppXh. SymmesTownship.

    Quilt Outreach Fabric Sale, 9a.m. to 1 p.m., Quilt Outreach,Free. 607-6569; quiltoutreach-.com. Madeira.

    Tours

    Cincy Wine Wagon WineryTour, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mag-gianos Little Italy, $65. Reserva-tions required. 258-7909;www.cincybrewbus.com. Syca-more Township.

    SUNDAY, JUNE 5Drink TastingsLChaim: Israeli Wine Tastingand BBQ, 4-7 p.m., Adath IsraelCongregation, 3201 E. GalbraithRoad, Lerner Fisher Hall. Sample6-8 Israeli wines and BBQ menuof shish kebab, Mediterraneansalad, hummas with pita, anddessert sweets. Activities, gamesand prizes throughout evening.Ages 21 and up. Free. Reserva-tions recommended. 793-1800;adath-israel.org. AmberleyVillage.

    ShoppingFair Trade Oriental Rug Event,noon to 5 p.m., Ten ThousandVillages Harpers Point, Free.802-5721; bit.ly/1S0ppXh. SymmesTownship.

    Support GroupsFamily Backyard Bash: Cele-brating Cancer Survivorship,11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cancer SupportCommunity, 4918 Cooper Road,Food, games, arts and crafts andmore. Get sneak peek at kids andfamily programs for summer.Program for anyone impacted bycancer. Free. Reservations recom-mended. 791-4060. Blue Ash.

    THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

    ABOUT CALENDARTo submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in

    and click on submit an event. Send digital photos to ky-news@communitypress.com along with event information.Items are printed on a space-available basis with local eventstaking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publicationdate.

    To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

    PROVIDED

    A Friday Night Grillout is scheduled for 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, May 27, at Lake Isabella, 10174Loveland-Madeira Road, Symmes Township. Items will be available a la carte. Dine on theoutdoor covered patio by the lake or in the air-conditioned Chart Room. Live music will beperformed. Cost is $10, $8.50, $4.25 for children ages 10 and younger. Presented by Great Parksof Hamilton County. Call 521-7275; visit www.greatparks.org.

    PUZZLE ANSWERS

    K T E L E P S O N S E A J U D DA R N O M A R C O F I R M P R O A MR I C A P R O T A G O R A S E D E M AS C H M I T T H A N D T V G U E S TT I A M O I S T E D U C E S Y E TS A N M A R I N O A L K A L I P E L E

    T A G I O N Y E N G L O S S AN E A B E G S N A N O S

    C E L E S T A D O N I M U S O H M A NO C A T R I R A P T L Y S L I M EM O U N T A I N H I G H V A L L E Y L O WE N D O R O S W E G O R U E N U TR O S I E S T Y R E N E M E O W E R S

    S A M O A D E A L D N AG A M E T E T N N G I N W I MA N A S T I E O F F A A A R A T I N GS T Y O N S A L E N O M A R N E OP I E R R O T V E E R E N D W I T HA F L A C H E A R T E L L O F E C T OT U L I P A M I S P I A N O P A L M

    R A N T T I L O T T E R T R E E

  • MAY 25, 2016 LOVELAND HERALD 9ANEWS

    I know the older I get the fast-er time goes, but gosh, May is justflying by. Memorial Day is almosthere! Its a special day for me andmy family. We attend open air (ifweather permits) mass at St. Phi-lomena church, one of the oldestchurches in our county. We plantmy moms mint on her and mydads graves, and the kids help mearrange flowers. Its a meaningfultradition for sure.

    Memorial day honors our fall-en soldiers and those others who havepassed, and many of us will celebrate theday as a kick-off to picnic season. Icouldnt wait to share these yummy reci-pes!

    Readers dilemma solvedWhite cake from scratch that is light

    textured like store bought. Reader AnnieHoffman, a talented and inquisitive bak-er, makes wedding cakes. Annie told me: For years I have searched for a scratchvanilla cake recipe that isnt the consis-

    tency of corn bread, and has thatbouncy texture of a box mix, with-out using a box mix. Is there such athing? I have tried hundreds, yes,that many, to no avail. My cakebusiness is all scratch except forvanilla, people just like the mixbetter. Help if you can.

    Rose Levy Beranbaum to therescue. Regardless of how busy thisfamous celebrity baker and notedcookbook author is, Rose alwaysresponds quickly.

    Rose suggested her white velvet cake.It is soft, tender, flavorful and far supe-rior to any box cake mix. Its in my bookThe Cake Bible.

    Rose has an engaging blog on her site:www.realbakingwithrose.com. I suggestyou subscribe to it.

    Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist,educator, Jungle Jims Eastgate culinaryprofessional and author. Find her blogonline at Abouteating.com. Email her atrita@communitypress.com with Ritaskitchen in the subject line.

    Worlds best slow cooker creamed corn

    The slow cooker creamed corn is so popular that just about everyone wants tomake it. I first heard about it from my neighbor, Erin, who made it for a family gather-ing. It was so good, she said. Then my friend, Sue Marks, a Mount Washington readerand host of Food Thoughts, a radio show for the blind and visually impaired, sent methe recipe. After that, it went viral and you know the rest.

    2-1/2 pounds frozen yellow corn1 cup whipping cream (you could also use half & half)8 oz. cream cheese, room temperature, chunked up1/2 cup shredded or grated Parmesan cheese6 tablespoons butter, room temperature, cut up1 tablespoon sugar or substituteSalt and pepper to taste

    Spray slow cooker. Put cream, crew, cheese and butter in slow cooker and whiskuntil almost smooth. Stir in rest of ingredients. Cover and cook on low 4-5 hours, stirringoccasionally, or until mixture is smooth and creamy and corn is crisp tender.

    Mississippi mud cake

    For the Northern Kentucky reader who lost her recipe in a move. I want the recipe thats madefrom scratch. Its always the first dessert to disappear at our Memorial Day picnic, she said.

    1 cup butter1/2 cup cocoa2 cups sugar4 large eggs, lightly beaten1-1/2 cups flour1 teaspoon vanilla1-1/2 cups chopped pecans4 cups mini marshmallows

    Preheat oven to 350. Put butter and cocoa together and cook over low heat until butter melts.Transfer to mixing bowl. Add sugar and eggs, beat on medium until blended. Add flour and vanilla.Beat until blended. Stir in pecans. Spoon batter into sprayed 13x9 pan. Bake 35 minutes. Removefrom oven and immediately sprinkle marshmallows over hot cake. Then immediately spread frostingover the marshmallows. It will look bumpy. Cool and then chill before slicing.

    Chocolate frosting

    Beat on medium speed until smooth, adding a bit more milk if too stiff:

    1 pound confectioners sugar, sifted or put through a sieve to remove lumps1/2 cup milk1/2 cup cocoa4 tablespoons butter, softened

    Everyone wants to make slow-cooker creamed corn

    THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

    This creamed corn is prepared in a slow cooker.

    Rita HeikenfeldRITAS KITCHEN

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  • 10A LOVELAND HERALD MAY 25, 2016

    VIEWPOINTSVIEWPOINTSEDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM Cincinnati.com/communities

    LOVELANDHERALDEditor: Richard Maloney, rmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134

    LOVELANDHERALD

    Loveland Herald EditorRichard Maloneyrmaloney@communitypress.com, 248-7134Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-FridaySee page A2 for additional contact information.

    7700 Service Center Drive, West Chester, Ohio, 45069phone: 248-8600email: loveland@communitypress.comweb site: Cincinnati.com/communities

    A publication of

    May 18 questionWhat is the significance of

    Memorial Day to you?

    Memorial Day is a feder-al holiday in the UnitedStates for remembering thepeople who died while serv-ing in the countrys armedforces. I think it should beextended to include thosewho lost their lives as fire-men and policemen. To me itis the unofficial beginning ofsummer, the end of theschool year and time topause and remember thosewho served this country andgave the ultimate sacrifice.Go Figure!

    T.D.T.

    May 11 questionWhom should Donald

    Trump and Hillary Clintonchoose as their runningmates? Why?

    There are a number ofexperienced people whom Iwould have confidence in asvice president for DonaldTrump. I live in the hope thatthey will all be asked to takepositions of great impor-tance in order to quickly takethe necessary steps to re-store Americas economy,security, military strengthand respect on the worldstage. However, I keep re-turning to Dr. Ben Carson tobe the ideal choice for vicepresident because of his pas-sion for the best direction tobe taken for our country; hisability to quickly learn aboutand investigate issues, toconsider and seek the inputof experienced and qualifiedindividuals and proceed ac-

    cordingly, and his affinitywith all people. Should mis-fortune befall the president ,Dr. Carson would, I am sure,have been totally involvedand current with all affairsand at the ready to summonthe best confidants and ad-visers for a safe, smoothpath forward.

    I do not see anyone on thehorizon who would have anyinclination or guts to deviateor compromise from the lib-eral agenda of big govern-ment and control, or the Clin-ton/Obama agenda. There-fore, there is no way for meto make a Democratic vicepresidential choice. Besidesthat, the thought of HillaryClinton, with her longstand-ing, extensive history ofpoor judgment, lies andfeigned interest in the wel-fare of the American people,possibly making her way tothe presidency is not onlyfrightening but offensive fora great country that cameinto being based on opportu-nity, freedom, honor andbravery.

    S.N.

    CH@TROOM

    THIS WEEKSQUESTIONWhat is your all-time favoritemovie - the one that you willalways watch if you comeacross it while channel-surfing? Why do you like it?

    Every week we ask readers aquestion they can reply to viaemail. Send your answers tormaloney@communitypress.comwith Ch@troom in the subject line.

    Recently, a residentdropped off an article for meto read. The article was fromTime magazine written byCharlotte Alter titled, WhyAmerica Needs More FemaleCops. It highlights the impor-tance and inclusion of womenin the New York Police Depart-ment.

    I noted the article proudlystates, women make up 17percent of its (NYPD) forcecompared to the national aver-age of 12 percent. Many timeswe think of the large, urbandepartments as being the in-novators in law enforcement.However, your Loveland PoliceDepartment has a long tradi-tion of innovation, particularlyin hiring practices.

    Officer Betty Rajewskijoined the Loveland Police

    force as a fulltime policeofficer in 1974.In perspective,only 2 percentof all policeofficers werewomen in 1970(Female Offi-cers in theUnited States,Barbara Price,National In-

    stitute of Justice.) By 1978,Officer Rajewski was assignedto the Hamilton County Homi-cide Task Force as an investi-gator. She went on to receivenumerous commendationsduring her distinguished ca-reer for outstanding workprior to her retirement.

    We have carried on thisinnovative tradition. Today,

    more than 22 percent of oursworn officers, and 30 percentof our total staff, are women.This is almost twice the nation-al average quoted in the arti-cle. LPD female officers areactive in bike patrol, fieldtraining, crime scene investi-gation, and more. I am proud tobelong to a department thathas worked hard to be as in-novative as possible and trulyrepresentative of the commu-nity we serve.

    Incidentally, on May 24 at 7p.m. Officer Melba Schultz, aLoveland Citizen Police Acad-emy Alumni Association grad-uate and member, will besworn in before City Council.

    Dennis Sean Rahe is Love-land police chief.

    Women in law enforcement

    DennisSean Rahe COMMUNITY PRESSGUEST COLUMNIST

    Id do this for free.Im sure youve heard this;

    perhaps youve even said it. Iwant to take this opportunity tooffer a sincere thank you to thecountless members of the Ti-ger Family who put thesewords into practice eachschool year. While we couldntthrive without the valuedmembers of our Tiger staff,the volunteers who help usfrom the classroom to the showchoir to the field are absolutelypriceless.

    Thank you to the parentswho have given their time toraise funds through PTA or-ganizations to enhance theeducational opportunities forall of our students.

    Thank youto the boostergroup mem-bers who sup-port our aca-demics, artsand athletics making theLoveland expe-rience so veryspecial foreach studentwho they sup-

    port.Thank you to the communi-

    ty members who have offeredtheir services to help me orga-nize advisory groups as wemove our district forwardtoward an exciting future.

    If youve ever helped a child

    with homework, chaperoned afield trip, chauffeured a stu-dent to and from a perfor-mance or competition Ithank you. We simply couldntdo what we do without yourhelp year after year. As thisschool year comes to a close, Iwant to personally tell you weare Many Stripes; One Tiger and the role you play is vitalto our success.

    While you are willing to dothis work for free, my hope isthat the smiles you see acrossthe faces of the lives you posi-tively impact makes it allworth it.

    Chad Hilliker is LovelandCity School District superinten-dent.

    Many stripes, one Tiger

    ChadHilliker COMMUNITY PRESSGUEST COLUMNIST

    What is the Large HadronCollider? Simply, it is a 17-milein circumference tunnel severalhundred feet below charmingSwiss and French towns, vil-lages, and countryside, a ringfilled with $5 billion of huge

    magnets, detec-tors and com-puters used toacceleratebeams of pro-tons head-on ateach other toproduce sub-atomic parti-cles that arestudied bymore than10,000 scien-tists and phys-

    icists from around the world.The scientists hope that their

    studies of the interaction be-tween protons, neutrinos,quarks, leptons and bosons willprovide clues to the formationof the universe during the theo-rized Big Bang of 13.8 billionyears ago. One particle, theHiggs boson, named for phys-icist Peter Higgs who predictedit in 1964, was allegedly detect-ed in 2012 and is nicknamed theGod particle for its expectedability to explain phenomenaconnected with the universescreation.

    Cost of discovery of theHiggs boson exceeded $13.25billion, according to Forbesmagazine.

    Despite a large scientificstaff gleaned from more than

    600 universities and operationalcosts exceeding $1 billion a year,listed accomplishments for theCERN (European Organizationfor Nuclear Research) facilityat Geneva since 1954 seem to befew and far between. The tourdocent explained how the Collid-er works, but focused mainly onhow the facility was built andequipped, not on meaningfuldiscoveries.

    Joel Achenbach in NationalGeographic magazine (March2008) noted a fear that thecollider will fail to find thethings that physicists insistmust be lurking in the deepsubstrate of reality. Such a bigmachine needs to produce bigscience, big answers, somethingthat can generate a headline aswell as interesting particles.

    CERN does claim that one ofits scientists designed the firstweb page for the Internet in1989.

    Writing to his father in Geor-gia in April, 1945, an Americanmissionary serving as a captainin the U.S. Army in Chinamused about hoped-for life as afarmer after the war: I onlywant enough of science to en-able fruitful husbandry of theland with simple tools, a timefor leisure, and the guarding ofmy familys health. I do not careto be absorbed in the endlessexamining of force and spaceand matter, which I believe canonly slowly lead to God.

    Ironically, four months lateratomic discoveries at the Man-

    hattan Project brought theyoung captains war to an end.Perhaps peaceful cooperationbetween its 20 European mem-ber states (and Israel) will bethe only real accomplishment of

    CERN despite lofty and expen-sive dreams. The word utopiameans nowhere after centu-ries of constant, senseless, andbloody warfare, cooperationbetween Europeans seems like

    utopia. May the money not runout.

    Randy Kleine is a resident ofMilford.

    Tunnel could explain Big Bang

    RandyKleine COMMUNITY PRESSGUEST COLUMNIST

    PROVIDED

    Atlas is the largest experiment of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.

  • MAY 25, 2016 LOVELAND HERALD 1B

    SPORTSSPORTSHIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL CommunityPress.com

    LOVELANDHERALDEditor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

    You twist. It twinges.We heal.

    mercymovesyou.com

    6565CINADV (5/16)

    Girls lacrosse

    Loveland beat Lebanon 17-4 onMay 16.

    Ursuline topped St. Ursula, 13-10on Thursday last week. Lily Baldwinled the Lions with four goals.

    Tournament girls lacrosse Loveland defeated Mason 12-7 on

    May 19.

    Tournament boys lacrosse Loveland beat Sycamore 12-5 on

    May 20.

    Regular season baseball Loveland beat St. Xavier 8-6 in a

    tournament tune-up game May 16. Sen-ior Zach Chapman got the win. JuniorLuke Waddell was 3-for-4 with a doubleand senior Jay Wilson was 2-for-4 with adouble, homer and three runs batted in.

    Tournament baseball Loveland defeated Mason 3-2 in

    the Division I sectional final at LebanonMay 19. Senior Drew Steinbrunner gotthe win and Zach Chapman the save.Luke Waddell was 2-for-2 with a double,

    triple and a pair of runs scored. Sopho-more Cade Spikes delivered to the go-ahead run with a two-out single in thefourth inning.

    The Tigers moved on to play Belle-fountaine May 21 in Centerville.

    Moeller lost to Hamilton 1-0 May 19in the Division I sectional to finish the

    season 20-9. CHCA blanked Madeira, 4-0 in a

    Division III sectional game on May 18.Chase Murray recorded a double andtwo RBIs.

    Tournament softball CHCAs season was ended by Rog-

    er Bacon, 10-0 in just five innings onMay 16.

    Boys tournamenttrack and field

    Qualifying from the Division Idistrict meet at Mason May 20 for theregionals for Loveland were: the 4x800relay (Korniak, Mueller, Mesmer, Da-vis), third in 8:05.28; Zion Wynn, 400meters, third in 50.06 and champion inthe 200 meters at 22.41;

    Qualifying from the Division Idistrict meet at Mason May 20 for re-gionals from Moeller was Bryce Strick-er, shot put, third at 48 10.75.

    CHCA finished tied for 10th at theDivision II district finals at New Rich-mond with 29 points. Junior Adam Bak-er was the district champion in the longjump with a distance of 20 feet, sixinches.

    Zach Stiles, Kris Carnes, Alex Bar-

    SHORT HOPS

    Scott Springer and Nick RobbeCommunity Press staff

    TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

    Lovelands Zion Wynn finishes first in boys 200-meter final, at the district meet at Mason HighSchool May 20.

    See HOPS, Page 2B

    Lovelandsoftballfinishes4th

    Lovelands Audrey Swearingenlooks for something to hitagainst Turpin. Swearingen wassecond on the team in runsbatted in behind Lexi Braun.

    PHOTOS BY JIM OWENS/FOR THE ENQUIRER

    Loveland base runner Maggie Bailey goes into second base hard against Turpins MadinaWashburn. Bailey hit .582 and led the team in homers with three and doubles with 12.

    KENWOOD - Grant Mays was notable to attend the Centerville HighSchool scholar-athlete banquet Sunday.Considering the events of Saturday,the Elks lacrosse captain was fortu-nate to even make it to Sunday.

    The senior midfielder appeared tomake a gutsy play shortly after half-time of a game at Moeller, where theElks trailed the Crusaders, 8-2. A Cru-sader shot on goal hit Mays on the leftside of his chest, below his heart. Oninstinct, he picked up the ground balland started running down field.

    Then, he collapsed. Immediately,the referee stopped play.

    We knew something was prettyserious right away, Moeller coachSean McGinnis said. They stopped thegame and got the medical personnelout there. Then, it took a turn for theworse as his rhythm was off.

    Thats when the experience ofMoeller head trainer Craig Lindseyand head of security Rich Wallace paidoff. Lindsey had passed up a localtraining conference to preside overtwo events on Moellers back fields the lacrosse game and a rugby match.He also had the foresight to have anautomated external defibrillator(AED) on site with contact sports onadjacent fields.

    When it appeared standard methodswere not going to be enough to reviveMays, University of Cincinnati internAshley Higginbotham ran off the side-lines and returned with the AED. For-tunately, a Centerville parent, MikeJones, an emergency medical tech-nician, was in the crowd, along with

    Dr. Rob Hill from Florida, who was intown to watch his Moeller son, Griffin.

    Total team effortAll hands were on deck, including

    another Beacon Orthopaedics trainer,Josh Horner, from Princeton whomLindsey had procured with multipleevents on campus.

    From the second Mays went down,this team of heroes sprung into action.

    Eventually, they placed the devicespads on Grants chest and, after oneshock, he started breathing on his own.Not long after, Sycamore Townshipparamedics showed up and by the timeMays was in the ambulance, he wasstarting to stabilize. Wallace, an EMThimself and police chief of Amberley

    We felt like we werepart of a miracleQuick response savesailing Centervillelacrosse playerScott Springersspringer@communitypress.com

    PROVIDED/DEBBIE RANKEY

    Centerville senior lacrosse midfielder wasrevived at Moeller High School after he wasstruck with a ball near his heart andcollapsed on the field.

    See LACROSSE, Page 2B

  • 2B LOVELAND HERALD MAY 25, 2016 LIFE

    Loveland girls hoop it up

    PROVIDED

    The Loveland girls eighth-grade basketball team finished the season 12-2 conference and14-2 overall. They lost their first two games of the season and went on a 14-game winningstreak. They were in second place in the conference and won the ECC tournament beatingWalnut Hills in the championship game. Team from left: Izzy Ensley, Sophie Raby, BrieSaunders, Lauren Round, Sammy Riede, Kate Garry, Isabelle Hamilton, Jillian Hayes, MariaBashardoust, and Lizzy Ensley.

    BLUE ASH By mostaccounts, Ursuline sopho-more Emily Young has abright future in whichev-er sport she decides toplay.

    In addition to turning inimpressive performanceson the softball diamond,she trades in her cleats forskates and carves up thecompetition on the icehockey rink. Last year, sheparticipated in the TeamUSA Hockey developmen-tal camp. This spring, sheled the Lions youth move-ment.

    A lot of people ask mewhich one I am going topick for college, she said.Whatever opportunity Iget, Ill take. Right now, Iam happy playing bothand staying in shape.

    Also, she was namedGirls Greater CatholicLeague player of the year.In a league with the likesof Ava Lawson, AubreyBrunst and Sydney Zeuch,thats no easy feat.

    The 10th-grader had 46hits in 76 at-bats for a .605batting average, one homerun, 19 RBIs, 10 triples andsix doubles. She was alsoon base 62 percent of thetime and swiped 26 bags.

    I wasnt expecting it atall, Young said of beingselected as the confer-ences best player. I justtry to play the game witheverything I have andtrust what I know. Iwouldnt be where I am to-day without the supportsystem I have behind me.

    Young isnt the onlystellar sophomore on theteam. Sarah Mehrle, AbbyElliott, Lanie Berlage andRachael Schulte are just afew from that class whoproduced for the Lionsthis season.

    Plenty of Lions shouldbe in the mix for all-GGCLteams.

    We have a good sopho-more class, Ursulinecoach Missy Keith said.Were hoping they cancontinue to lead us in thedirection we want to go.

    That direction includesnot only competing withtheir fellow teams in theGGCL, but also teamssuch as Mason, Lebanonand Lakota East. Teamscoach Keith called thestandard.

    The Comets ousted theLions from the tourna-ment, 14-0 back on May 16.

    Playing against a teamlike Mason, the girls get tosee where the standard isfor softball in our area,the coach said.

    The Lions finished theseason 13-13.

    Ursulines Young leadingteams youth movement Nick Robbenrobbe@communitypress.com

    THANKS TO CHRISTIE BELL

    Ursuline sophomore EmilyYoung takes a cut at a goodpitch to hit.

    Village, had placed the911 call earlier in theprocess.

    Without the AED, itcould have gone the otherway, Lindsey said.Were so blessed that itdid its job. You take it topractice and games everysingle day, but I neverhad to use it in 21 years.

    A rare occurrenceWhat occurred to

    Mays was a conditioncalled commotio cordis.Its something Lindseyand all trainers learn incollege and is defined asa lethal disruption ofheart rhythm caused by adirect blow to the chestwhile the heart is in be-tween beats.

    When that happens, itsends the heart into aquivering state, Lindseysaid. Its not beatingefficiently. Its like theheart muscle is twitchingand not firing.

    Whomever may havehad doubts of the powerof prayer before had tohave at least come awaywith something to thinkabout during those tensemoments. Both teamsgathered around thescene and all was quietexcept for the sound ofHail Mary being re-peated by those kneelingnear Mays.

    After Grant collapsed,the players witnessed hismother sprinting towardher son and sobbing.

    We held hands anddid the only thing weknew to do: pray. Prayhard and loud, Moellerjunior lacrosse playerAdam Kohlman said.That kid needed us andthat Mom needed us.

    While his son was be-ing attended to, DougMays walked around thefield asking spectators topray. The nearby rugbygame also stopped andthose players joined inthe spiritual efforts whileLindseys crew workedfervently on resuscitat-ing Mays.

    It was almost like theperfect storm, McGinnissaid. Its a great blessingto have the right peoplewatching our game andtaking a tragic situationand turning it in to a posi-

    tive result.Mays was taken to a

    hospital to be seen by acardiologist. Lindsey,Wallace and McGinnisdrove up later and wereable to see Mays and hisparents in the emergencyroom.

    Preparation is crucialBecause of Grants

    prescribed need for rest,his father is speaking forhim until he is fully recu-perated. Doug and KelleyMays are forever grate-ful for the presence ofqualified medical person-nel and the presence ofan AED.

    The biggest thing Ican take away is the im-portance of having thosedevices, having themreadily available andcertified and having thetraining to use them,Mays said. These de-vices arent limited toathletes. Certainly, in thiscase, the athlete was thebeneficiary. They can belife savers.

    The proof came short-ly after the shock wasadministered. The firstwords from Grant Mayswere, Wow! I feelgreat! according to hisfather. Of course, he wasthen advised to remainstable to allow the trainedexperts to continue theirefforts.

    The game was neverfinished, but the outcomewas one for the ages. Noone left the field with aloss.

    I felt helpless, hismother felt helpless,Mays said. When hedrove away in the (life)squad, we felt very hum-bled. When he left thefield on the gurney, I hadmy son back.

    Pretty much the entirecampus had stopped whatit was doing to surroundGrant and his parentswith prayer.

    We felt like we werepart of a miracle, Kohl-man said.

    The men ofMoeller deliver

    McGinnis has seen histeams faith tested on andoff the field. By tradition,the team prays at thestatue of Mary on campusbefore climbing the stairsto compete at the GerryFaust Complex. Fausthimself still kisses thestatue at every visit.

    The Moeller missionon their website says thefollowing:

    As a Catholic school inthe Marianist Tradition,Archbishop Moeller HighSchool is a Christ-cen-tered community, focus-ing on faith formation,academic achievement,individual growth, and

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