Top Banner

Click here to load reader

Is our youth cycling to health? - Active Healthy Kids our youth cycling to health? 1 Is our youth cycling to health? T. Takken PhD, M. Burghard Msc, K. Knitel MSc & I. van Oost MSc

Jun 10, 2018

ReportDownload

Documents

lamnhu

  • Is our youth cycling to health? 1

    Is our youth cycling to health?

    September 2016T. Takken PhD, M. Burghard Msc, K. Knitel MSc & I. van Oost MSc

    www.activehealthykids.nl

    Dutch 2016 Report card onPhysical Activity for Children & Youth

  • Dutch 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth 2

    Results from the Dutch 2016 Report Card on: Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

    Is our youth cycling to health?

    Wilhelmina Kinderziekenhuis

  • Is our youth cycling to health? 3

  • 4 Dutch 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

    Date of Publication19 September 2016

    Principal investigatorTim Takken PhD

    Project managerMarcella Burghard MSc

    Research Working GroupMarcella Burghard MScChild Development & Exercise Center, & Shared Utrecht Pediatric Exercise Research (SUPER) Lab, Wilhelmina Childrens Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    Karlijn Knitel MScChild Development & Exercise Center, & Shared Utrecht Pediatric Exercise Research (SUPER) Lab, Wilhelmina Childrens Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    Iris van Oost MScChild Development & Exercise Center, & Shared Utrecht Pediatric Exercise Research (SUPER) Lab, Wilhelmina Childrens Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    Tim Takken PhDChild Development & Exercise Center, & Shared Utrecht Pediatric Exercise Research (SUPER) Lab, Wilhelmina Childrens Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    Mark S. Tremblay PhDHealthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

    Report Card Expert GroupC. Veenhof PhD1) University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Rehabilitation, Nursing Science & Sports, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.2) HU University of Applied Sciences, Research group innovation of Movement Studies, Faculty of Health Care, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

    D.F. Ettema PhDUtrecht University. Human Geography and Planning, Urban Geography

    Report Card Development TeamD.W. Smits PhD1) Brain Center Rudolf Magnus and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center de Hoogstraat, Utrecht, the Netherlands2) Department of Education & Pedagogy, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    D.H.H. van Kann PhDSchool for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), Department of Health Promotion,Faculty of Health, Medicine, and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, TheNetherlands.

    E.M. Monninkhof PhDUniversity Medical Centre Utrecht, Julius Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    H.C.G. Kemper PhDEMGO Institute, VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    J.F. de Groot PhD1) Child Development & Exercise Center, & Shared Utrecht Pediatric Exercise Research (SUPER) Lab, Wilhelmina Childrens Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands2) HU University of Applied Science, Research group Lifestyle & Health, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    J. van der Net PhDChild Development & Exercise Center, & Shared Utrecht Pediatric Exercise Research (SUPER) Lab, Wilhelmina Childrens Hospital, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    N.H.M.J. Schipper-van Veldhoven PhD1) Research Centre Human Movement and Education, Research Group Sport Pedagogy,Windesheim, University of Applied Sciences, Zwolle, the Netherlands.2) Dutch Olympic Committee*Dutch Sports Confederation [NOC*NSF], Department ofResearch and Intelligence, Arnhem, the Netherlands.

    P. Barendse MScKnowledge Centre for Sport Netherlands [KCS], Ede, the Netherlands

    R. van den Dool PhDMulier Institute [Mulier Instituut], Utrecht, the Netherlands

  • Methodology & Data sources

    Indicators & Grades

    Is our youth cycling to health?

    Overall physical activity

    Organized sport participation

    Active Play

    Active Transportation

    Sedentary Behavior

    Family & Peers

    School

    Community and the built environment

    Government and non-Government Strategies and Investments

    Overview & Conclusion

    Summary of indicators & Grades

    Abbreviations

    References

    Contents 5

    ContentsT. Altenburg PhDInstitute for Health and Care Research EMGO+, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    G.C.W. Wendel-Vos PhDNational Institute for Public Health and the Environment [RIVM], Bilthoven, the Netherlands.

    Advisory RoleM.D. Beijersbergen PhDUtrecht Municipality, Dept. Health, Utrecht, the Netherlands

    J. FaberSecondary Vocational Education Board [MBO Raad], Woerden, the Netherlands

    J.M.H. Lucassen PhD1) Mulier Institute [Mulier Instituut], Utrecht, the Netherlands2) Royal Dutch Society for Physical Education [KVLO], Zeist, the Netherlands

    S. de Vries MScPrimary School Board [PO-Raad], Utrecht, the Netherlands

    DesignBas van Leeuwen MScDelft University of Technology, Industrial Design Engineering, Delft, the Netherlands

    AcknowledgementsThe authors thank R. Beck (Knowledge Centre for Sports the Netherlands) and M. Buurman for her contributions to the 2016 Dutch Report Card. This work was supported by a seed grand from the Utrecht University focus area Sport & Society.

    7

    16

    17

    18

    22

    24

    27

    30

    34

    37

    42

    46

    50

    52

    54

    55

  • 6 Dutch 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

  • 7Methodology & Data Sources

    Grades were based on examination of the current data and literature for each indicator against a benchmark (see summary of indicators & grades) or optimal scenario, assessing the indicator to be poor, adequate, good or excellent:

    Grades

    A = We are succeeding with a large majority (81-100%) of children and youth.B = We are succeeding with well over half (61-80%) of children and youth.C = We are succeeding with about half (41-60%) of children and youth.D = We are succeeding with less than half (21-40%), but some, children and youth.F = We are succeeding with very few (0-20%) children and youth.INC = Incomplete. Not enough available evidence to assign a grade to the indicator or absence of clear well-established criteria.

    Some indicators are stand-alone, while others are comprised of several components (see summary of indicators & grades).

    Table 1 gives an overview of the primary data sources used to inform the grades assigned to each indicator and describes specific survey characteristics.*

    The report card gives an overview of the most recent relevant key findings on which the grading was based and gives an overview of relevant overall key findings as additional information/background in relation to the indicator.

    * Note: Several documents have been used for (non-) government strategies and investments. The majority of documents are descriptive and

    it would be too elaborate to present these documents in this table.

    The principal investigator and project manager formed an research working group together with six researchers of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht University and Utrecht University of Applied Sciences.

    An expert group was formed with inclusion of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Mulier Institute, Dutch Olympic Committee* Dutch Sports Federation (NOC*NSF), Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, Maastricht University, Knowledge Centre for Sports Netherlands (KSC), and advising roles for the Dutch Society for Physical Education (KVLO), Primary Education Board (PO-Raad), Vocational Education and Training Board (MBO Raad) and Municipality of Utrecht (Dept. of Public Health) (see page 2).

    Both the research group and expert group were responsible for the interpretation and evaluation of the data sources and evidence and decided on definitions and benchmarks of the indicators for the grading. Both groups were also responsible for the final grading. The principal investigator, project manager and the research assistants formulated the recommendations. The research working group evaluated these recommendations in their review of the report. It was decided to only include the required nine indicators from the Active Healthy Kids Global Alliance framework (www.activehealthykids.org) with no additional indicators. The process followed that of Active Healthy Kids Canada.1

    For the evaluation of the indicators, data for the period 2010 up to 2014 were included. When available, we used data from national surveys conducted by Statistics Netherlands (CBS) and the RIVM as primary data sources. If these sources could not provide the required data to grade an indicator, data from other (semi) government sources were used (e.g. Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (TNO), Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP), Mulier Institute) or data from non-governmental organizations (Jantje Beton, Maastricht University and Institute for Health and Care Research EMGO+).

    Methodology & Data Sources

  • Methodology & Data Sources 98 Dutch 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

    Name of survey and institution

    Survey description

    Year/s data collected,

    concerning Report Cardd

    Sampling method N AgesIndicators informed

    Survey Questions /components related to indicators

    Lifestyle Monitor (National Health Survey)

    CBS & RIVM 9,13

    Several lifestyles themes are gathered annually: smoking, alcohol, dru

Welcome message from author
This document is posted to help you gain knowledge. Please leave a comment to let me know what you think about it! Share it to your friends and learn new things together.