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Visual Communication & Visual Literacy Visual Literacy Presentation John W. Berry August 25, 2011
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Visual Communication & Visual Literacy Visual Literacy Presentation John W. Berry August 25, 2011.

Mar 29, 2015

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Visual Communication & Visual Literacy Visual Literacy Presentation John W. Berry August 25, 2011 Slide 2 Gestures Facial Expressions Objects Signs & symbols Slide 3 In Art Slide 4 In Photography Slide 5 In Architecture Slide 6 In Public Monuments Slide 7 In Film Slide 8 In Dance Slide 9 In Exhibitions Slide 10 In Fashion Slide 11 In Hairstyles Slide 12 In Interior design Slide 13 In Lighting Slide 14 In Computer games Slide 15 In Advertising Slide 16 In Logos Slide 17 Visual Literacy is the ability to interpret, use, appreciate, and create images and video using both conventional and 21st century media in ways that advance critical thinking, decision making, communication, and learning. Slide 18 The term visual literacy has been used for about 40 years, and, in general, is understood as the ability to interpret, recognize, create or manipulate images. Slide 19 Slide 20 2 art Image-based research literature science history medicine sociology Slide 21 A very high percentage of all sensory learning is visual; Contemporary culture is increasingly dependent on the visual for its capacity to communicate instantly and universally; Slide 22 Slide 23 Visual literacy is a gradual process of gaining greater sophistication of perception, conception and visual and linguistic vocabulary Students need to distinguish superficial, glamorous and pseudo-sophisticated messages from the real and valuable ones. (Ausburn & Ausburn, 1978) Slide 24 Images can be very powerful in our national and individual consciousness; Visual literacy involves problem-solving and critical thinking skills that can be applied to all areas of learning. Understanding the implications of images makes a viewer more resistant to manipulative uses of images in advertisement and other contexts (Messaris, 1995) Slide 25 As human beings, our brains are wired for images. According to research we process visuals 60,000 times faster than text. This is because we take in all the data from an image simultaneously while we process text in a sequential fashion. Lynell Burmark, Visual Literacy: Learn to See, See to Learn Slide 26 Visual Literacy refers to a group of vision-competencies a human being can develop by seeing and at the same time having and integrating other sensory experiences. The development of these competencies is fundamental to normal human learning. When developed, they enable a visually literate person to discriminate and interpret the visible actions, objects, symbols, natural or man-made, that he encounters in his environment. Through the creative use of these competencies, he is able to communicate with others. Through the appreciative use of these competencies, he is able to comprehend and enjoy the masterworks of visual communication. (Source: International Visual Literacy Association) http://www.ivla.org/org_what_vis_lit.htm The term visual literacy was first used by John Debes in 1969. http://www.ivla.org/org_what_vis_lit.htm Slide 27 "We need to work with today's learners in the medium of their generation..." Steve Jobs Slide 28 " Visual literacy stems from the notion of images and symbols that can be read. Meaning is communicated through image more readily than print, which makes visual literacy a powerful teaching tool." Source: Reconceptualizing Literacy, Edwards, Patricia A, Reading Today 27.6 (June-July 2010): p22 Slide 29 "The illiterate of the future will be the person ignorant of the use of the camera as well as of the pen. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy...1935 Slide 30 "If students aren't taught the language of sound and images, shouldn't they be considered as illiterate as if they left college without being able to read or write? Filmmaker George Lucas, quoted in Edutopia Slide 31 "Without an understanding of media grammars, we cannot hope to achieve a contemporary awareness of the world in which we live." Marshall McLuhan Slide 32 "A democratic civilization will save itself only if it makes the language of the image into a stimulus for critical reflection---not an invitation for hypnosis." Umberto Eco Slide 33 Every image sheds light on the assumptions of the day. Every image reveals, as well as defines, events. Every image must be read, must be interpreted. This is a perilous act, one that often leads us far away from the safe ground sought be most historians. Yet reading the image, like reading any text, is a way to engage the past and connect it to our lives. Louis Masur, Historian Slide 34 Slide 35 Slide 36 Slide 37 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Th_1azZ A2OY Slide 38 http://www.recovery.gov/Transparency/Map Gallery/Pages/LightsOn.aspx Slide 39 http://www.recovery.gov/Transparency/Map Gallery/Pages/LightsOn.aspx Slide 40 ACRLs Visual LiteracyStandards Task Force Slide 41 ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Process established by ACRL Information Literacy Standards Committee, Tip Sheet 4: Developing Subject-Specific Information Literacy Standards (http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/resources/tipsheets/tip4substandard s.cfm)http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/resources/tipsheets/tip4substandard s.cfm ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education is foundational document Visual literacy in an interdisciplinary, higher education environment Slide 42 Timeline review : February 2010 ACRL Information Literacy Standards Committee supports project March 2010 Task Force and Advisory Group formed April-June 2010 visual literacy research, bibliography development, started blog June 2010 VLTF open meeting at ALA Annual August 2010 working definition of visual literacy released September 2010-January 2011 standards drafted by VLTF January 2011 Advisory Group review of standards February 2011 draft of standards publicly released Process dates : February 10 March 31, 2011 open review and testing period, ongoing outreach March 2011 ALA Annual program call for participation April 2011 standards revisions, begin approval process (IRIG Convener, ILSC, Standards & Accreditation Committee, ACRL Board) June 2011 introduce draft standards at ALA program ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 43 Introduction..the pervasiveness of images and visual media does not necessarily mean that individuals are able to critically view, use, and produce visual content. Individuals must develop these essential skills in order to engage capably in a visually-oriented society. Visual Literacy Defined Visual literacy is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media Visual Literacy and Higher Education Scholarly work with images requires research, analysis, and evaluation skills specific to visual materials. These abilities cannot be taken for granted, and need to be taught, supported, and integrated into the curriculum. Visual Literacy and Information Literacy The Visual Literacy Standards address some of the unique issues presented by visual materialsand challenge students to develop a combination of abilities related to information literacy, visual communication, interpretation, and technology and digital media use. ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 44 Standard One The visually literate student determines the nature and extent of the visual materials needed. Performance Indicators The visually literate student defines and articulates the need for an image The visually literate student identifies image sources, materials, and types ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 45 Standard Two The visually literate student finds and accesses needed images and visual media effectively and efficiently. Performance Indicators The visually literate student selects the most appropriate sources and retrieval systems for finding and accessing needed images and visual media. The visually literate student conducts effective image searches. The visually literate student acquires and organizes images and source information. ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 46 Standard Three The visually literate student interprets and analyzes the meaning of images and visual media. Performance Indicators The visually literate student identifies information relevant to an images meaning. The visually literate student situates an image in its cultural, social, and historical contexts. The visually literate student identifies the physical, technical, and design components of an image. The visually literate student validates interpretation and analysis of images through discourse with others. ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 47 Standard Four The visually literate student critically evaluates images and their sources. Performance Indicators The visually literate student evaluates the aesthetic and technical characteristics of images. The visually literate student evaluates the effectiveness and reliability of images as visual communications. The visually literate student evaluates textual information accompanying images. The visually literate student makes judgments about the reliability and accuracy of image sources ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 48 Standard Five The visually literate student uses images and visual media effectively. Performance Indicators The visually literate student uses images effectively for different purposes. The visually literate student uses technology effectively to work with images. The visually literate student uses problem solving, creativity, and experimentation to incorporate images into scholarly projects. The visually literate student communicates effectively with and about images. ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 49 Standard Six The visually literate student designs and creates meaningful images and visual media. Performance Indicators The visually literate student produces images for a range of projects and scholarly uses. The visually literate student uses design strategies and creativity in image production. The visually literate student uses a variety of tools and technologies to produce images. The visually literate student evaluates personally created image products. ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 50 Standard Seven The visually literate student understands many of the ethical, legal, social, and economic issues surrounding the creation and use of images and visual media, and accesses and uses visual materials ethically. Performance Indicators The visually literate student understands many of the ethical, legal, social, and economic issues surrounding images and visual media. The visually literate student follows ethical and legal best practices when accessing, using, and creating images. The visually literate student acknowledges image creators and sources in projects and presentations. ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/ Slide 51 Implementation The Standards may be used as a whole, or in part, depending on curricular needs and overall learning goals of a program or institution. A visual studies course or a year-long series of courses involving visual materials may be an appropriate context for full implementation of the Standards. In other circumstances, the individual Standards may be more useful as stand-alone tools for teaching and assessing specific sets of learning outcomes. Slides & Docs From ALA Annual Conference Session 2011 http://connect.ala.org/node/151263#attachments ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards ~ http://acrlvislitstandards.wordpress.com/