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UBC104 Embedded Systems Introduction to Embedded Systems

Dec 19, 2015

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susan-snow

  • Slide 1
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems Introduction to Embedded Systems
  • Slide 2
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 2 Goals of the Course Understanding of the Components of an Embedded System My part: Programming Issues Programming of microcontrollers Input/Output Control
  • Slide 3
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 3 Overview of whats to come Refreshing C Programming Programming Microcontrollers Interrupts & Timers Serial Communication Microcontroller Interconnections Comparing various Interconnections Overview of Microcontrollers Comparing Characteristics
  • Slide 4
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 4 Overview of whats to come Refreshing C Programming Programming Microcontrollers Interrupts & Timers Serial communication Microcontroller Interconnections Comparing various interconnections Overview of Microcontrollers Comparing characteristics Exercises Reports
  • Slide 5
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 5 Recommended Reading: Programming in C & 8051 [1]B. W. Kernighan and D. M. Ritchie, The C Programming Language, ISBN 0-13-110362-8, Prentice Hall, 1988. [2] M. J. Pont, Embedded C, ISBN 0-201-79523-X, Addison-Wesley, 2002
  • Slide 6
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 6 Recommended Reading Embedded Systems [1] D. E. Simon, An Embedded Software Primer, ISBN 0-20-161569X, Addison-Wesley, 1999 [2] Q. Li & C. Yao, Real-Time Concepts for Embed- ded Systems, ISBN 1-57-8201241, CMP Books, 2003 [3] M. Ben-Ari, Principles of Concurrent Program- ming and Distributed Systems, ISBN: 0-13-7010788, Prentice Hall, 1982
  • Slide 7
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 7 Characterization of Embedded Systems Specific purpose Limited processing power Invisible to user * Figure is courtesy of philips.com, amazon.com & erricson.com
  • Slide 8
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 8 Examples of Embedded Systems
  • Slide 9
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 9 Ubiquitous devices
  • Slide 10
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 10 Microcontroller vs. Microprocessor Low power consumption Specific meaning of registers Limited amount of memory Intel 8051s, Atmel AVRs Generic I/O Large instruction set Cache Requirement for peripherials 68000, Pentium MicrocontrollerMicroprocessor
  • Slide 11
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 11 Examples
  • Slide 12
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 12 Jamess Side of the Course
  • Slide 13
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 13 Microcontroller Motorola 68H11, 68HC12, Intel 8051, 8052, 80251, Microchip PIC16F628, 18F452, 16F877, Atmel ATmega128, ATtiny28L, AT90S8515, Intel StrongARM1110, PXA25x
  • Slide 14
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 14 Typical Quote Personally I started with PICs and have not looked into the other ones much. Motorola's 68HC family is often used for somewhat more complex tasks than PICs, but tends to be more difficult to buy. The smaller AVR's are much like the PICs in price and performance. Hence PIC-or-AVR debates tend to be very hot. There are so many 8051 clones around that it is difficult to say something in general about this family. Quote from Wouter Olaf van Ooijen
  • Slide 15
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 15 Atmel 8051
  • Slide 16
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 16 Tasks for Today UBC Handbook - Exercise 1: (at the moment) http://www.dsg.cs.tcd.ie/~sweber/Teaching/UBC104 Connect to a departmental machine called macneill.cs.tcd.ie and get your environment set up: Editor Compiler Debugger
  • Slide 17
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 17 Hello World int main() { /* The Hello World program */ printf(Hello World\n); return 0; }
  • Slide 18
  • UBC104 Embedded Systems 18 Hello World int main() { /* The Hello World program */ printf(Hello World\n); return 0; } Comment Output of Hello World followed by a newline Start of the program