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Science Fair Packet “Science All Around Us” - lausd. · PDF fileScience Fair Day: May 26th, 2011 Science Fair Packet “Science All Around Us ... Students are required to display

Mar 27, 2018

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  • Crescent Heights Language Arts and Social Justice Magnet School

    Science Fair Day: May 26th, 2011

    Science Fair Packet

    Science All Around Us

  • Crescent Heights Language Arts and Social Justice Magnet

    Student Science Fair Project 2011

    Self-Check Timeline

    Tasks

    Choose and submit a content-appropriate

    scientifically oriented project for teachers approval.

    (See last pages for possible topics)

    Identify the variable.

    Write down the procedure.

    List and gather material needed.

    Conduct investigation.

    Collect and organize data (information)

    Second to fifth grade:

    Write a summary about what you learned.

    Write explanations based on their evidence.

    Put presentation together.

    Turn in science fair project.

    Take display and model home.

  • CHOOSE AND SUBMIT A CONTENT-APPROPRIATE

    SCIENTIFICALLY ORIENTED QUESTION.

    (3RD TO 5TH GRADE STUDENT MAY SUBMIT AN INVENTION.)

    Due: ___________

    Write your question (It shouldnt start with WHY!)

    ______________________________________________

    ______________________________________________

    What is your variable? My variable is ____________________________________________

    ___________________________________________________________________________

    What is the procedure? First I will _______________________________________________

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    Circle your data collection method(s): observations drawings measurements photos

    Other: ______________________________

    What materials and/or tools are you using:_________________________________________

    ___________________________________________________________________________

    ___________________________________________________________________________

    Caretakers signature: ____________________ Teachers signature: ___________________

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  • What is the Scientific Method?

    The scientific method involves following six general steps in sequence. The basic

    steps are:

    1. Problem, Purpose, or Research Question: The problem or research question is

    the single most important part of the scientific method. Every part of your project is

    done to answer this question. The research question is sometimes formed as a statement and is called the

    "Problem" or "Problem Statement." What is your goal or what idea are you trying to test? What is the scien-

    tific question that you are trying to answer?

    2. Hypothesis: The hypothesis is an "educated guess," formed as a statement that you propose to be the

    answer to the research question. Explain how you think your project can demonstrate your purpose. You

    should try to state the results you are predicting in measurable terms. Not always will your conclusion match

    your hypothesis.

    3. Materials: List all supplies and equipment used in conducting your research or experiment. Your list of

    materials should include all of the ingredients of the procedure.

    4. Procedure: The procedure is a somewhat detailed, step - by - step description of how you conducted your

    experiment. Be clear about the variables vs. your controls. Be specific about how you measure results to

    prove or disprove your hypothesis. Your procedure should be like a recipe whereby another person should

    easily be able to follow it. Photos depicting the steps are good to have on your display board.

    5. Observations, Data, Results: The results are usually in the form of a statement that explains or interprets

    the data. Results can be in the form of raw data, graphs, general summarization of what your data is telling

    you. Photos can also be used here. Example: "Test Plant 3 showed little difference in growth rate as com-

    pared to the Control Plant."

    6. Conclusion: The conclusion is a summary of the research and the results of the experiment. This is where

    you answer your problem or research question. You make a statement of whether your data supported your

    hypothesis or not. You may have data that supported part of your hypothesis and not another part. You may

    also have data that did not support your hypothesis at all. In this case, you may explain why the results were

    different.

    The scientific method is not cast in concrete but it is systematic and easy enough to learn. And interest-

    ingly, many scientific discoveries come about by accident, by getting unexpected results and accidentally ask-

    ing questions that had not even been asked. Who knows, perhaps YOU will be the one to make the next big

    discovery!

  • Student Science Fair Project Self

    Crescent Heights Language Arts and Social Justice Magnet

    3rd - 5th grade

    EXAMPLES OF SCIENTIFICALLY ORIENTED QUESTIONS

    KEY POINT: SCIENCE IS TO ANSWER How not Why

    - How many shapes can water be?

    - How fast does water evaporate?

    - Do we have the same temperature within a season?

    - How many seeds do apples have?

    - How does milk sour?

    - Do materials float differently in water, in oil, in sea water?

    - What materials will float in water?

    - What makes the best bubbles?

    - How does the sun affect land and water?

    - How fast can different members of the land snail family move?

    - What happens when two or more colors are combined?

    - What does a seed need to grow?

    - How does light affect plants?

    - How do plants grow better- in the sunlight or artificial light?

    - How do plants use their roots?

    - How does mold grow?

    - In what concentration of salt water can root grow?

    - How are popcorn stored best?

  • - What materials dissolve in water?

    - How fast do different material dissolve in water?

    - How fast does a common garden snail travel?

    - What is the effect(s) of watering plants with different

    concentration of detergent?

    - What is the effect(s) of watering a plant with different liquids?

    (coffee, soda, sugar water...)

    - Which paper towel is mos absorbent?

    - How do crystal grow?

    - How can we build the best string telephones?

    - How do hearing aids work?

    - How fast does water climb?

    - How can we compare different rocks?

    - Would the same kind of seeds always produce the same

    exact plants?

    - How does water affect the land?

    - How does the size of an object affect the speed it can reach?

    - How the strength of a push change how far a basketball go?

    - How many ways can an object be moved?

    - How does the shape of a paper plane affect its flight?

    - How does the quality of the ground affect speed?

    - How does a roller coaster work best?

  • Young Inventors Program Guidelines and Rules

    Entering an invention to be evaluated for the Young Inventors Fair:

    (Items in this section are most pertinent to the evaluation process.)

    1. Students must be in grades 3-5.

    2. The invention must be the work of a single inventor.

    3. The invention must be the original work of the student. Any assistance from adults should be kept

    to a minimum this is a project for young inventors! For example, a student may need assistance

    for safety reasons.

    4. An entry may be either a completely new idea or item, or an improvement on a previously existing

    invention. Early in the invention process, student inventors are expected to check the Google Patent

    website, available online at www.google.com/patents to confirm the originality of their invention idea.

    5. The student must produce either a functioning prototype or a model of the invention.

    An invention logbook must be used to document the process from the idea to prototype or model.

    Documentation that someone observed the testing of the invention is required.

    Participating in the Young Inventors Fair:

    1. Students will be responsible for transporting their invention.

    2. Students should plan an oral presentation and be ready to explain and discuss their invention.

    3. Students are req