Top Banner

Click here to load reader

REWARDS : R Excellence: Word A R Development S ... (Intermediate), REWARDS (Original Program), The REWARDS Program was designed to meet the needs of struggling readers REWARDS Intermediate

Jan 21, 2020

ReportDownload

Documents

others

  • REWARDS : Reading Excellence: Word Attack & Rate

    Development Strategies An overview of the program presented by :

    Gail N. Adams, M.Ed Nationally certified REWARDS trainer

  • REWARDS Plus: Reading Strategies Applied to Social Studies Passages,

    & REWARDS

    Plus:Reading Strategies Applied to Science Passages

    REWARDS (Intermediate), REWARDS(Original Program),

  • The REWARDS Program was designed to meet the needs of

    struggling readers REWARDS Intermediate

    • Grades 4-6 • Read at 2.5 or above • 25 lessons

    REWARDS Secondary/Original

    • Grades 6+ • Read at 2.5 or above • 20 lessons

    REWARDS Plus: Social Studies & Science

     Grades 6+  Read at 4th or above  45-66 days of

    instruction

  • What is REWARDS Intermediate & Secondary?

    •A research-validated program • Consisting of 20- 25 fifty minute lessons • To teach intermediate and secondary students a flexible strategy for decoding long words

    •To enhance their decoding accuracy and fluency

  • REWARDS Intermediate & Secondary

    is based on three premises:

    80% of all words have an affix Every decodable part has a vowel sound Close approximations can be corrected using content.

  • Why might you want to teach REWARDS?

    READING is the major predictor of academic success

    But many of our intermediate and secondary students are poor readers, have trouble passing content-area classes and are not doing well on the state tests.

  • Older Struggling Readers

    “We don’t have to give up on older students with limited literacy. The great majority of them do not have serious reading disabilities; they are better described as “curriculum casualties”. And we can do something about that. It’s not too late. We should give them what they so desperately need and want: a concentrated, ambitious, research-based literacy curriculum”

    Jane Fell Green

  • Report of the National Reading Panel

    Available at no charge : www.nationalreadingpanel.org

  • Why might you want to teach REWARDS?

    • Necessary for comprehension – Word recognition is a necessary,

    though not sufficient, skill to allow comprehension.

  • Why might you want to teach REWARDS?

    As you participate in the following activity reflect on the contributions word recognition makes to reading comprehension.

  • QuickTime™ and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor

    are needed to see this picture.

  • QuickTime™ and a TIFF (LZW) decompressor

    are needed to see this picture.

  • Why might you want to teach REWARDS?

    • Most of the new words have 2 or more syllables Cunningham, 1998

    • The longer words are often content words that carry the meaning of the passage.

  • Why might you want to teach REWARDS?

    Assume you cannot read multisyllabic words. Read the following passage. The underlined multisyllabic words have been deleted. How much would you gain from reading this social studies passage.

  • “The f s of the c n f d a d t c t. They saw the need for a strong n l g t. At the same time, they did not want to take away all p r from the states. Like most A s, they b d that state g t would better u d the special needs and

    c s of their c s.”

  • “The framers of the constitution faced a difficult conflict. They saw the need for a strong national government. At the same time, they did not want to take away all power from the states. Like most Americans, they believed that state government would better understand the special needs and concerns of their citizens.”

    From the American Nation (1994) published by Prentice Hall

  • Why might you use REWARDS?

    • Poorly developed word recognition skills are the most pervasive and debilitating source of reading challenges. (Adams, 1990; Perfetti, 1985; Share and Stanovich, 1995)

    • The ability to decode long words increases the qualitative differences between good and poor readers. (Perfetti, 1986)

    • Poor decoders, even those who can decode single syllable words, have a difficult time with multi-syllabic words. (Just & Carpenter, 1987

    • Low decoders – Pronounce fewer affixes and vowel sounds correctly – Disregard large portions of letter information (Shefelbeine & Calhoun,

    1991)

  • Why might you want to teach REWARDS?

    • The “Matthew Effect” – Students with low word recognition

    and fluency skills will read less. “The rich get richer. The poor get poorer.”

    (Stanovich,1986)

  • Data on 5th Grade Students Time 5th Graders Spent Reading

    In and Out of School

    Standardized Test Scores

    Time Spent Reading Per Day

    Words Read Per Year

    90% 40 minutes 2 million 50% 13 minutes .5 million 10% 1.5 minutes 50,000

    Anderson, R.C., Wilson, P.T., and Fielding, L.G., (1988). Growth in reading and how children spend their time outside school. Reading Research Quarterly, 23, 285-303.

  • Think, Pair, Share

    • What are the some advantages of reading more volume?

  • Reading More Leads to Accompanying Gains in:

  • Why might you want to use REWARDS?

    • Teaching helps! • REWARDS Research

    – Reading deficient 4th and 5th graders who were taught the REWARDS strategies made significant gains over students receiving monosyllabic word instruction. (Archer, Gleason, Vachon, Hollenbeck, 2004)

    – Significant increases in word reading accuracy and fluency were observed in 6th, 7th, and 8th graders. (Vachon & Gleason, 2004)

  • The dilemma………

    How am I ever gonna learn to read when all of the words are DIFFERENT????

  • A Solution………..

    Students need a flexible strategy for pronouncing long words.

    No relationship exists between knowledge of syllabication rules and successful reading.

    (Canney & Schreiner, 1977)

  • Overt Strategy 1. Circle the word parts(prefixes at the beginning of the word.

    2. Circle the word parts (suffixes) at the end of the word.

    3. Underline the letters representing vowel sounds in the rest of the word.

    4. Say the parts of the word.

    5. Say the parts fast.

    6. Make it into a real word.

    Example:

    reconstruction

  • 3. confederate

    2. fraction

    1. expansion

    Overt Strategy

  • Covert Strategy for Reading Long Words

    1. Look for word parts at the beginning an end of the word, and vowel sounds in the rest of the word.

    2. Say the parts of the word. 3. Say the parts fast. 4. Make it a real word.

  • Needed Preskills • Vowel combinations • Vowel conversion • Underline vowel sounds in words • Correcting close approximations using

    context • Pronouncing word parts • Identify & circling words parts

  • Two Types of Lessons : Preskill and Strategy

    Preskill Lessons • Oral activities

    • Blending word parts into words • Correcting close approximation using

    content • Vowel Combinations and Vowel

    Conversions • Underlining vowels in words

    • Prefixes and Suffixes • Circling prefixes and suffixes in words

    • Vocabulary • Spelling Dictation

  • AUDITORY SKILLS

    Blending word parts into words

    • Correcting close approximations using content

  • REWARDS :Auditory Skills

    16

  • REWARDS : Auditory Skills

    Activity F

    page 32

    17

  • Sounds & Names of Vowel Graphemes

  • REWARDS :Vowel Graphemes

    activity B page 29

    20

  • REWARDS :Vowel Graphemes

    Activity D

    Page 31

    22

  • REWARDS :Vowel Graphemes

    Activity E

    Page 32

    23

  • REWARDS : Word Parts ( Affixes) from lesson 1 new edition

    Activity G page 33

    29

  • REWARDS : Word Parts (Affixes)

    Activity H page 34

    30

  • REWARDS : Focus on Meaning

    Activity I page 35

    32

  • REWARDS : Focus on Meaning- Word Families

    Family 2

    construct- Megan will construct a model house of legos.

    constructing- She loves constructing

    things from legos. construction- The construction of the

    complicated house will take days. Reconstruct- If the house falls down, she will

    have to reconstruct it.

    Word Relative Instruction- new edition 1. Read the first word construct 2. Read the sentence 3. Tell your partner the meaning of the

    word construct. 4. (Call on a student) What does construct

    mean? 5. Read the next word constructing 6. Read the sentence 7. Tell your partner the meaning of the

    word constructing. 8. (Call on a student) What does the word