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Rachel Hamblin 3 Mathematics Lesson 1 Grade __Kindergarten _ Name of Unit: Data Projects Name of Lesson: Favorite Days Prerequisite Knowledge: Students have heard the story, “The Wednesday --- -Surprise,” which describes a family‟s dynamic and why Wednesday is their favorite day of the week. Students consider their own weekly routines and decide upon which day is their favorite day of the week. Learning Targets (Goals) (Understand that…) -Students should be able to relate number of peers under a favorite weekdays to simple math statements -Students should be able to understand how to analyze simple graph information -Students should be able to compare and contrast simple information given in bar graph format Success Criteria (I can…) -I can tell which day of the week most of my class likes the most -I can tell which day of the week most of my class likes the least -I can tell how many of my friends liked each day of the week Process Standards (Problem Solving, Communication, Connections, Reasoning and Proof, Representations) -Problem Solving: The students are using problem solving when asked to tell how many students chose a specific day as their favorite in the week. They will have to use their addition skills to be able to respond. Through comparing and contrasting the 7 days of the week and how many students chose each day as their favorite, they will be able to chose any strategy they would like to use, helping them to gain mathematical knowledge such as using counting and addition strategies. -Reasoning and Proof: Students will be using reasoning and proof when they are asked to compare and contrast the days of the week according to how many students chose them as their favorites. They will be asked to explain their answers and how they ended up at their answer. By being asked to explain themselves, how and why, they found an answer, they will be catching misconceptions and be sharpening their reasoning skills deepening their thought concerning proof and evidence. -Communication: The students will be using communication when they are asked what the graph is about. For example, the students might say, “Five
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  • Rachel Hamblin 3

    Mathematics Lesson 1 Grade __Kindergarten_

    Name of Unit: Data Projects

    Name of Lesson: Favorite Days

    Prerequisite Knowledge: Students have heard the story, The Wednesday ---

    -Surprise, which describes a familys dynamic and why Wednesday is their favorite day of the week. Students consider their own weekly routines and

    decide upon which day is their favorite day of the week.

    Learning Targets (Goals) (Understand that)

    -Students should be able to relate number of peers under a favorite weekdays to simple math statements

    -Students should be able to understand how to analyze simple graph information

    -Students should be able to compare and contrast simple information given in bar graph format

    Success Criteria (I can)

    -I can tell which day of the week most of my class likes the most

    -I can tell which day of the week most of my class likes the least -I can tell how many of my friends liked each day of the week

    Process Standards (Problem Solving, Communication, Connections,

    Reasoning and Proof, Representations) -Problem Solving: The students are using problem solving when asked to tell

    how many students chose a specific day as their favorite in the week. They will have to use their addition skills to be able to respond. Through

    comparing and contrasting the 7 days of the week and how many students

    chose each day as their favorite, they will be able to chose any strategy they would like to use, helping them to gain mathematical knowledge such as

    using counting and addition strategies.

    -Reasoning and Proof: Students will be using reasoning and proof when they are asked to compare and contrast the days of the week according to how

    many students chose them as their favorites. They will be asked to explain their answers and how they ended up at their answer. By being asked to

    explain themselves, how and why, they found an answer, they will be catching misconceptions and be sharpening their reasoning skills deepening

    their thought concerning proof and evidence.

    -Communication: The students will be using communication when they are asked what the graph is about. For example, the students might say, Five

  • people chose Wednesday as their favorite day or Eight people chose

    Saturday as their favorite day. The students will also be asked to write or draw an explanation about their favorite day. By describing, drawing and

    communicating their favorite day of the week and what the graph is about, the students are explaining mathematical ideas through communication.

    -Connections: The students are using connections in this lesson because

    they are connecting math addition, comparing and contrasting numbers, and possibly subtraction to a real world concept. The students first are choosing

    their favorite day of the week and then are exposed to their classmates favorite day of the week. By using this scenario, the students are

    connecting their favorite day of the week and the weekly routines of the

    class to mathematics.

    -Representations: The students are using representations through using mathematic skills by comparing, contrasting, and describing the information

    from a simple bar graph formed by the classes favorite days of the week. The bar graph is used as a visual aid for the students, as is the teacher

    writing down the students true math statements on the chart paper.

    Materials and Preparation:

    -Investigations in number, data, and space. Sorting and Surveys. Data Analysis. Unit 7. Grade K. (2008).

    -Sizing Up Measurement: Activities for Grades K-2 Classroom, by Vicki Bachman (2007)

    -Time: Favorite Days: pages 48-51 -The Wednesday Surprise, by Eve Bunting (1989)

    -Cutouts large enough to write a childs name on them (2 per child) precut beforehand

    -Chart Paper, 2 or 3 sheets -Classroom calendar premade before class

    -Homework worksheets (1 per student) -Early finisher activities (1 per student)

    Warm-up/Opener: As a warm up for the lesson of Favorite Days the teacher will review

    vocabulary with the students. The vocabulary will include the days of the week (Sunday through Saturday) and we will review which days are

    weekdays and which days are part of the weekend and the difference between them. The way the teacher will do this is by posing a Tell what you

    know about questioning strategy. The teacher will write on the whiteboard, Tell what you know about the days of the week. The students

    should be answering this question, and the teacher will be writing down their ideas on the whiteboard. The teacher can ask probing questions such as,

    How many are in a month? and Which day is the first day of the week?

  • App. 4 minutes

    Launch:

    During the explore portion of the Favorite Days lesson, the students are expected to be listening to the story The Wednesday Surprise and then

    expected to participate in the class discussion afterward and answer

    questions concerning the book about why Wednesday was so important to the family. The students are then expected to think about their own weekly

    schedules and routines and what their favorite day of the week is and why (8 minutes). After brainstorming, students should be split into partner

    groups of 2 to talk about their favorite day of the week for 5 minutes (set on timer that is on desk.) After discussing with their partner and deciding what

    their favorite day of the week is, the students will be given a sheet of computer paper and are expected to write (or draw) about his or her favorite

    day. While the students are writing or drawing about their favorite day, the students will be asked to put their name cutout on the classroom Favorite

    Day Graph under their favorite day of the week. This portion should take 10 minutes. After the graph is finished and posted on the board, the students

    will be asked to describe and explain what they know about the graph, using true mathematical statements. Such as, number of students who chose

    Friday as their favorite, how many students total are on the board,

    comparing and contrasting the amount of students under certain days, or maximum or minimum. The teacher should be keeping track of these ideas

    on a white board or smart board.

    For any students who finish early during the partnering time or during the time of describing their favorite day on a piece of paper, the teacher will

    provide an earlier finisher activity called, Hungry Mouse Counting Game. The teacher will provide the students with a counting worksheet and a

    worksheet that practices writing numbers. These worksheets will be worthwhile because it will give the students extra practice on counting and

    writing numbers, which will be used during describing the Favorite Days Graph.

    App. 23 minutes

    Explore:

    A. -Expect students to have trouble finding reasons to specify a day as their

    Favorite *plan to assist the students by providing examples for the students to relate

    to. For example I might say A child I know likes Fridays because Friday night was movie and pizza night at their house and similar relative

    examples

    -Expect students to have questions concerning true math statements when

  • asked to discuss and describe what the graph is about.

    *plan to assist the students by providing an example they can follow or model that will help for understanding. For example, the teacher will first

    ask Which day do most of the students like the most or How many students like Thursday the best? and then record the data on the chart

    sheet next to the graph. Then as students to start adding their own statements, without posed questions. The teacher should keep recording

    them down so students can use each as examples or record them for themselves if they are able to.

    B.

    During the discussion between partners and when the students are writing

    or drawing their favorite day I will be taking notes on which students are using the correct vocabulary (correct days of the week, weekday, weekend,

    and routine) and which students need extra practice on the words. I will also be taking notes on which students are staying focused and on task.

    When the students are describing what the graph is about, I will be looking for students to use true math statements, statements that are reasonable.

    C. The formative assessment strategies used will be:

    1. Group Consensus/White Board when the class together discusses and describes the graph. The answers are written on the white board or

    smart board and the whole class is to agree on the final answers. 2. Key Points when at the end of the lesson, the full class discussion

    about the vocabulary of the days of the week, more or less, fewer, most, least, more than, and etc. that we talked about during the

    lesson. The students should also discuss which day was the most

    favored and the day that is the least favored. Students can offer reasons for their favorite day if time permits. Teacher will list key

    points and reasons on the board. 3. Questioning strategies are used during the warm-up and the closing of

    the lesson. Tell what you know about is used during the warm-up when the students explain what they know about the days of the

    week. Error Analysis is used during the closing when the teacher poses a scenario and the students must point out the error.

    D.

    For differentiation, the teacher will pair the students to partners at a similar skill level to each other, so they can keep up with each other when

    discussing their favorite day. When describing their favorite day of the week on the computer paper, the students are allowed to write (this is for gifted

    students who can already write and read), while others can do a combination

    (students who are able to write and read some, but still need pictures for part of description), and others can solely draw on the page to describe their

    favorite day of the week (for students who are not able to read or write yet).

  • E. The Hungry Mouse Counting Game early finisher activities are attached at

    the back of the lesson plan.

    Summarize: A.

    The students will share the results from their exploration by describing their favorite day of the week on a sheet of computer paper. The students will

    also share their results by attempting to record the math statements in their notebooks (if they are not able to write sentences, they can just write the

    number and word. For example 8 Friday, or the best they can).

    B. The key mathematical ideas that were learned in this lesson were analyzing

    a bar graph, comparing, contrasting, and describing information given from a bar graph, and that real world questions that relate to their lives can be

    related back to math.

    C. The teacher will check for understanding by having a full class recap of the

    description the class gave of the graph and how our Favorite Days relate to counting. The teacher will pose a scenario of Error Analysis writing on the

    board and reading to the students, Ana says that Friday is most favored day for the class. Can you find the error she made? The students should be

    given the chance to answer, but should know that an explanation of what they are thinking is expected. The teacher should then ask the students to

    describe maximum and minimum, and comparing and contrasting number of students in each day. Ask for any clarifying questions that students have

    about the Favorite Day bar graph and how we related it to counting numbers. Let the students know what they need to do for the following

    class.

    App. 4 minutes

    Application: For homework, the teacher will extend the lesson focusing more sharply on

    the concept of more than by sending home a worksheet called More that deals with counting and comparing. These worksheets are attached at the

    back of the lesson plan.

  • Mathematics Lesson 2 Grade _Kindergarten_

    Name of Unit: Data Projects

    Name of Lesson: Do you like? Surveys

    Prerequisite Knowledge: The students have previously worked with sorting data in simple charts. Students are shown model survey previously made by

    teacher and are asked to begin brainstorming on their own survey question.

    Learning Targets (Goals) (Understand that)

    -Students should be able to come up with a Do You Like? survey question to which yes or no are the possible responses

    -Students should understand how to keep track of student responses

    Success Criteria (I can) -I can produce my own yes or no survey question to ask my peers

    -I can record responses on a chart of my peers answers -I can compare and contrast my survey question to my peers questions

    Process Standards (Problem Solving, Communication, Connections, Reasoning and Proof, Representations)

    Problem Solving: Students are using problem solving in this lesson when they are deciding on the best way to record responses from their peers.

    They must decide on their own how to record only yes or no answers, and what they should do with other answers such as, maybe or I dont know.

    Communication: Students are using communication when they are

    interviewing their peers with their survey questions. The students are expected to share their survey questions, while comparing and contrasting

    their own with peers.

    Connections: In this lesson, students are connecting producing survey

    questions and keeping track of responses to data analysis. The students are being asked to collect data by choosing the best way to keep track of or

    analyze peers responses through data analysis.

    Reasoning and Proof: Students are using reasoning and proof when deciding the best way to keep track of which students they have already asked. They

    will be asked to describe how they decided on the method of keeping track and explain why their method was effective.

    Representations: Students will be using representations in this lesson plan

    through describing and using mathematical concepts, such as adding, when conducting and describing their surveys. The students are also using the

  • teachers model survey as a visual aid for creating their own surveys.

    Materials and Preparation: -Investigations in number, data, and space. Sorting and Surveys. Data

    Analysis. Unit 7. Grade K (2008). -Do you like? Surveys: Data Projects: pages 100-105

    -Student Activity Book, p. 77

    -Chart: Do you like applesauce?; class list -Chart paper

    -Student Math Handbook Flip Chart, pp. 45-46 -Homework worksheets (1 per student)

    -Early Finisher activities (1 per student)

    Warm-up/Opener: As a warm-up, the teacher will review with the students the vocabulary that

    will be used in this lesson. The vocabulary includes survey and data. The students will be asked to describe what a survey is, what data is, and how

    they relate to each other. The teacher will post on the smart board or white

    board the premade chart with the question Do you like applesauce? written on it for a visual aid for the students to compare their descriptions to.

    App. 4 minutes

    Launch: During the explore portion of the Do you like? Surveys lesson, the

    students are expected to be participating in describing the premade Do you like applesauce? survey made by teacher. The students will be given the

    opportunity to share their observations about the survey and our results

    before looking at the specific aspects of the data collected. The students will be encouraged to make observations that involve numbers and comparisons.

    If students do not comment on the specific number of people who answered yes or no, the teacher should ask them to. The teacher will then write these

    numbers next to the appropriate column on the chart. The teacher will then ask the students how many people answered this survey and how could the

    students figure that out. The students are expected to take part in this class discussion by offering ideas and suggestions. After the class discussion has

    come to a close, the students will be asked to come up with their own survey question. The teacher should explain to students that the question must be

    able to be answered with a yes or no. Students will be asked to offer suggestions, which the teacher will record on the board for visual examples

    for the students to use. If the students are suggesting questions that do not require a yes or no answer, help them to think how to reformulate their

    question. The teacher should also encourage the students to use a variety

    of subjects for their questions. For example, if the students only come up with questions about food, help them to think about other subject areas such

    as what they like to do in their free time. The teacher will then introduce the tools that the students can use when conducting their survey. These

  • tools include: a class list and a worksheet premade for the students.

    Concerning the class list, ask the students how the list can help them collect their survey data. The students are expected to offer suggestions about

    how the class list will help them collect the data. For example, a student might say I could put blue next to Victor if he says yes and red if he says

    no. After the class discussion, the teacher should draw attention to the pre-made worksheet saying, This one has a column that says yes and a column

    that says no. How could you use this chart to keep track of your data? The students are expected to offer suggestions to how this would help them

    collect their data. Ask the students to discuss their ideas of how they might keep track of their data on a piece of paper. The students are expected to

    chose the method they find to be most effective for themselves. Before

    officially sending the students off on choosing their method and question, the teacher should pose an Agree/disagree and explain why questioning

    strategy. The teacher might say, A good survey question is What are you doing this weekend? Agree/disagree and explain why. The students should

    respond to this and explain their thinking. This questioning strategy will show the teacher if the students are prepared to begin producing their

    question. The teacher should collect the responses on the white board or smart board so the students can refer to them. (App. 12 minutes)

    The students are now asked to spend some time deciding on a Do you like? survey question to ask their classmates and choosing one of the

    three offered methods for recording responses. The teacher should ask the students to write the question they choose on their recording sheet and

    decide how they are going to use the sheet. The students are allowed to work with a partner on this project, although it is not required. Many

    students may want to work on their own due to being invested in their own

    question. If the teacher notices that a student is having trouble getting started but does not have a partner, they might say, Would you like us to

    find you a friend to work with? If students finish choosing their question and recording methods before the class is ready to reconvene, the students

    should check in with the teacher about their chosen questions and methods to make sure they are reasonable. If the students seem to be ready to start

    collecting responses before the rest of the class is ready, the students can start working on the earlier finisher, Counting Worksheet until the rest of

    the class is ready to start collecting responses. When the class is ready, they will interview each other, using the methods they chose to record their

    peers responses. If a student is finished recording before others, they can work on the early finisher, Counting Worksheet while waiting for the rest of

    the class to finish. (App. 10 minutes) The students are now asked to share the kind of Do you like? question

    they chose as well as the specific question they chose. The teacher will

    record this information on the white board at the front of the classroom. The possible types of questions might be food, activities, TV shows/movies,

    and other. Ask students to observe and describe what they notice about the

  • final chart with mathematical statements, such as I see that 12 people

    chose survey questions about food. (App. 10 minutes)

    App. 32 minutes

    Explore:

    A.

    -Expect students to have issues with using mathematical descriptions when describing the survey given by the teacher. The teacher should

    be prepared with probing questions concerning students using numbers to describe. For example the teacher could ask, Can you tell

    me how many students said they like applesauce? How could we figure that out?

    -Expect certain students to struggle with coming up with a survey

    question that is not a replica of the teachers survey questions of Do you like applesauce? The teacher should be prepared to help students

    think of other subject they can ask question about. For example, the teacher could ask, What other types of questions could we ask? What

    do you like to do in your free time? Students might give answers such as, soccer, basketball, or fishing and these can be examples for the

    students to go off of.

    -Expect certain students to have issues with formulating survey

    questions that are not specifically yes/no questions. In these cases, the teacher should be prepared to help the students reformulate their

    questions to make them in a yes/no question format. The teacher could do this by probing the student to use the Do you like? format

    rather than a what do you like about? or why do you like? format.

    B. Throughout the lesson, I will be paying attention and taking notes of

    students who are using the correct vocabulary of survey and data, and which students are struggling with using the correct words and need

    extra practice. I will also be taking notes on which students are finishing the tasks with ease and which students are not grasping the

    concept of creating the yes/no survey. I will look for students who are

    effectively describing the teachers survey and their own, using mathematical statements.

    C. The formative assessment strategies I will be using in this lesson are:

    1. Group Consensus/White Board when the class together discusses and describes the teachers survey. The teacher will be recording the

    students statements and numbers and the whole group will agree on correct statements.

  • 2. Key Points when at the end of the lesson, the full class will discuss

    the key points that were discussed during the lesson. The words that will be reviewed are survey and data concerning what they mean

    and how they are related. Key points concerning the surveys will also be taken as important aspects of the lesson. Teacher will list the key

    points and what they mean on the board.

    3. Sentence Starters will be used at the end of the lesson in order to assess what they students still need help with. An example of a

    sentence starter is Now I know This sentence starter will allow the students to express issues they are having on the concept of surveys

    and how to describe them. The teacher should record the responses on

    the white board or smart board for the students to follow along.

    D. For differentiation, students might need help formulating their survey questions. English Language Learners might also need practice saying

    their questions aloud so their classmates can easily understand them when they administer their surveys. Certain students might need

    extra help with deciding which method to use when recording their peers responses. The teacher should be prepared to provide the

    adequate scaffolding to those students who need extra help, including allow enough time for them to come up with a survey question. The

    early finisher, Counting Worksheet will allow those students who finish quickly to have something to work on while students who need

    extra help have time to prepare for the questioning portion of the lesson.

    E. Early finisher, Counting Worksheet is attached at the back of the lesson plan

    Summarize:

    A. The students will share the results from their exploration by describing the survey question they chose and which method they decided to use

    to effectively record the responses of their peers in the class discussion. The students will also share their results by describing

    what they know about surveys and data in the final class discussion.

    B. The key mathematical ideas that were learned in this lesson were creating, administering, and describing a survey by collecting data

    from classmates. Students will be able to say, I can find out what my classmates like by asking questions, Keeping track of who I asked is

    important when surveying, and I can describe and compare about what my classmates like by asking them questions.

    C. The teacher should check for understanding by having a final class discussion at the end of the lesson, asking clarifying questions to the

    students. These clarifying questions will include the sentence starters

  • that were mentioned earlier in the lesson (Now I know) along with a

    Which one doesnt belong and why? For this questioning strategy, the teacher will write on the white board or smart board 3 possible

    survey questions. These could be, Do you like the beach?, Do you like dogs?, and What is your favorite color? The students should

    choose the survey question that does not fit and explain why it does not fit. This strategy will illustrate to the teacher that the students

    understand what is the appropriate question for their survey. Finally, let the students know what they need to do for the next day.

    App. 4 minutes

    Application:

    For homework, the lesson will be extending to focus more sharply on comparing data by sending home a worksheet that deals with the concept of

    fewer than. During the next lesson, the students will be collecting their survey data collection, so this worksheet will be practice for comparing and

    describing the data they will find.

  • Mathematics Lesson 3 Grade _Kindergarten_

    Name of Unit: Data Projects

    Name of Lesson: Collecting Data

    Prerequisite Knowledge: In the previous lesson, students produced their own survey question to ask their peers. The students were allowed to choose the

    most effective strategy to use for recording data in their surveys. The students have practiced collecting and sorting data in their homework

    assignment.

    Learning Targets (Goals) (Understand that)

    -Students should be able to decide which strategy for recording data they will use when surveying their peers

    -Students should understand how to collect and sort the data from their results

    Success Criteria (I can)

    -I can survey my peers using the Do you like? survey question that I produced

    -I can chose an effective method for recording survey data

    -I can record and collect the data given from my peers answers

    Process Standards (Problem Solving, Communication, Connections, Reasoning and Proof, Representations)

    Problem Solving: Students will be using problem solving when they are

    surveying their students. If they realize that the method they chose to record the responses is not working how they expected, they will need to

    use problem-solving skills to change or modify their method.

    Communication: Students are using communication through surveying their

    peers. While asking their peers a question and recording the data, the students are also answering questions that their peers are asking. If one

    student is having trouble with their methods the students are also able to use communication by suggesting an easier method for a peer to use.

    Connections: Students are using connections in this lesson through

    connecting the responses they receive and the results from their survey to data analysis. The students are doing this by collecting and sorting the

    data, analyzing what they have heard and now see.

    Reasoning and Proof: Students are using reasoning and proof when choosing a method for recording responses. They should be able to explain

  • why and how they are going to use this method and why they believe it will

    work best for them. Through this, the students will be using their reasoning and proof.

    Representation: Students are using representations during this lesson by

    taking the responses of their peers and creating a data analysis by collecting and sorting the information. The students surveys will represent the

    majority or feelings of the class based on the question they asked.

    Materials and Preparation:

    -Investigations in number, data, and space. Sorting and Surveys. Data Analysis. Unit 7. Grade K. (2008).

    -Collecting Data: Data Projects: pages 106-110 -Chart: survey model Do you like applesauce?; class list; blank piece of

    paper -Student Math Handbook Flip Chart, pp. 45-46

    -Early Finisher activity (1 per student) -Homework worksheets (1 per student)

    Warm-up/Opener: As a warm-up the teacher will review with the students the vocabulary that

    they recently learned in that last lesson, including, survey and data. The teacher will do this by posing a Tell what you know about surveys and data

    questioning strategy. The teacher should write this on the white board or smart board and then read it aloud to the class. While the students are

    responding to the question, the teacher should be recording their ideas on the board as well. The teacher will have the students take notice to the Do

    you like applesauce? model on the board, reminding the students of the questions they formed yesterday. The teacher will then introduce the

    vocabulary word of response and what the definition means.

    App. 4 minutes

    Launch:

    During the explore portion of Collecting Data lesson, the students are expected to be collecting data through the responses of their peers to the

    questions they are asking. The students should be using the method that they chose from the three possible strategies given by the teacher.

    Students are expected to keep track of whom they have surveyed so far. The students will be given a certain amount of the to survey their peers,

    asking and answering the Do you like? survey questions. The students

    should be encouraged to use yes or no answers, rather than maybe, I dont know, or sometimes. Students who are beginning to finish quicker

    than other students should be working on the earlier finisher activity. Students should be given around 8-10 minutes to ask their classmates. It is

  • ok if they are not able to ask every student because they will get more time

    to survey the following day. The teacher should expect certain students to struggle with treating this surveying time as a social get together. The

    teacher should be prepared to watch the students and listen to the conversations going on, making sure that words exchanged are dealing with

    the survey. (App. 20 minuets) After all the students have had a sufficient time to survey each other, ask

    the students to return to their seats to then discuss and share. During the discussion, the students should be asked to share how they are decided to

    record other students responses. The teacher should compare and ask the students to notice difference between the strategies. Finally, the teacher

    should remind the students that once they record responses, the students

    should be able to look at their sheet and get some information from it. The teacher should then ask if two or three students with different recording

    methods if they can explain and describe any information they can get from looking at the survey responses. If the students are having trouble

    describing the information from their survey, the teacher should ask some probing questions such as, If Beth used the class list and wrote yes or no

    next to each persons name, what can you find out from her sheet? After describing the information or data the students will be asked to compare

    the different ways of recording data. The students should be asked to notice a few different ways of recording and the information they can get from each

    way. Next, the teacher should address the issue of how to record students responses that are not yes or no. The teacher should ask the students how

    they recorded those responses. For students who did not have answers other than yes or no, ask them what they plan to do if they get a response that is

    not yes or no. Give the students a few minutes to review their survey and

    responses. (App. 10 minuets)

    App. 30 minutes

    Explore: A.

    -Expect students to have issues with receiving responses that are not yes or no but Maybe, I dont know, and/or I cant decide. Certain

    students maybe struggle with these responses and not know how to record

    them and become stuck. Certain students might chose not to record them at all, while others may become confused. The teacher should be prepared

    to help by thinking through what they can do with the response. For example the teacher could suggest adding another category, or using a

    different color for any responses outside of yes or no.

    -Expect students to realize during the surveying time that their chosen method is in fact not as effective as they had planned. These students

    might become frustrated and want to give up after realizing that their

  • method is not working. The teacher should be prepared to help them modify

    their strategy. For example, the teacher could suggest taking what they have learned from their first method and starting from there with a new

    strategy. The teacher could also ask what they think they could do different from here on and tell them to make the change and keep going. The

    teacher should make sure these students know that making changes is ok but acceptable.

    B. Throughout the lesson, the teacher should be paying close attention to

    the students while they are surveying each other. It is very important that the students are working towards collecting data. The teacher should take

    note of the students who are describing the information they see from the

    responses from their survey. The teacher should be paying attention to those students who are not able to describe the information they are getting

    from the responses. It is very important for the teacher to take note of these students because they are the ones who should be given extra

    attention and support.

    C. The formative assessment strategies that are being used in this lesson are:

    1. Questioning strategies during the warm-up and closing of the lesson. The tell what you know about strategy is being used in the warm-up to help

    students be refreshed and reminded what they learned about surveys and data in the previous lesson. The agree/disagree and why will be used

    during the closing to show the teacher if the students fully understand the concept of an appropriate why of collecting data looks like.

    2. Key Points during the class discussion when the teacher and students go over the different possible strategies that were used in the surveying. The

    teacher discusses with the students the key points of the lesson concerning the fact that students should be able to get information from looking at their

    data collection.

    3. Conferences outside of the actual lesson. During the lesson, the teacher should be taking notes on the students that were struggling with effectively

    recording the responses from their peers in a way that they can get information about the class by looking at the responses. Through using

    conferences during silent reading time, the teacher can help understand where these students are having issues and can help them work through the

    problem so that they can fully understand the concept of gathering information from a survey.

    D. For differentiation, students might have issues with recording responses to

    their survey and seem unsure of how to do so. The teacher should be

  • prepared for students to have this issue and should be ready to suggest a

    particular method that you think will work well for them. Using a class list is particularly helpful for students who have difficulty writing. Another way to

    help student have adequate time to survey their peers, an early finisher, Count the number of objects will be offered to students who are finishing

    quickly, which will allow students more time and not feel rushed to finish.

    E. Early finisher, Count the number of objects is attached at the back of the lesson plan.

    Summarize:

    A. The students will share their results from the exploration by splitting into groups by which strategy they chose to use to record the

    responses of their peers. The students will discuss in their groups how they decided to collect their data and why it worked best for them. In

    these groups the students will also be describing and comparing their results.

    B. The key mathematical ideas that must come out in the sharing are that they can chose an effective method to keep track of who they

    asked when surveying, the students can describe and compare the

    results of their survey, and students are able to effectively collect and sort data from administering a survey to peers.

    C. In order to check for understanding, the teacher will pose a questioning strategy called, Agree/disagree and explain why. The

    teacher should write on the white board or smart board, If my classmate responses with a word other than yes or no, I should not

    record it agree/disagree and explain why. The students should respond to this and explain themselves.

    Application:

    For homework, the lesson will be extending to focus more sharply on

    analyzing data by sending home a worksheet called Rachels Survey that deals with the concept of counting and comparing data from a. During the

    next lesson, the students will continue collecting their survey data, and begin sharing so this worksheet will be practice for comparing data.

  • Mathematics Lesson 4 Grade _Kindergarten__

    Name of Unit: Data Projects

    Name of Lesson: Sharing Do you like? Surveys

    Prerequisite Knowledge: The students have been working with surveying each other for the past two lessons. They have created their own Do you

    like? survey question and have chosen a strategy for collecting data from the responses from their peers. Certain students have already began or

    finished surveying their peers.

    Learning Targets (Goals) (Understand that)

    -Student should be able to decide if the strategy those chose of collecting the data from their survey is effective or not

    -Students should understand how to collect and keep track of survey data -Students should understand how to interpret results of a data investigation

    Success Criteria (I can)

    -I can learn things about my peers by asking them survey questions -I can collect data in more than one strategy

    -I can get information from looking at my finished survey

    Process Standards (Problem Solving, Communication, Connections,

    Reasoning and Proof, Representations) Problem Solving: Certain students, who are still working on their first

    survey, collecting data from their peers, are using problem solving when using their chosen methods of collecting data. If they realize that their

    method is not working as they had planned, they will need to modify or change their strategy. Other students who have already finished their first

    survey have the option of administering another survey with a new question

    and new strategy. These students will be using problem solving to figure out a new way to collect their data.

    Communication: Students are using communication during this lesson when

    they are sharing their survey. The students will be asked to share the question that they asked, what they found out, and to compare how many

    students said yes to how many students said no.

    Connections: Students are using connections during this lesson when interpreting the results of their data investigation. They now can see the

    results from their peers and they are being asked to get information from it, describing the collection of data.

    Reasoning and Proof: Students are using reasoning in proof during this

  • lesson when they are given the chance to share their surveys to the class.

    They are asked to describe what they asked and what they found out. Through this the student can use reasoning and proof to describe their data

    collection from the survey.

    Representations: During this lesson, students will be using representations when describing their surveys to the class. While explaining their survey,

    the students are asked to tell how many said yes, how many said no, and how many people responded with a different answer. While describing, the

    student will be using addition/counting strategies in order to count the number peers in each category.

    Materials and Preparation:

    -Investigations in number, data, and space. Sorting and Surveys. Data Analysis. Unit 7. Grade K. (2008).

    -Sharing Do you like? surveys: Data Projects: pages 111-113 -Chart: survey model Do you like applesauce?; class list; blank piece of

    paper -Student Math Handbook Flip Chart, pp. 45-46

    -Early Finisher activity (1 per student) -Homework worksheets (1 per student)

    -Example of each strategy for recording data

    -Students complete recordings of their survey responses

    Warm-up/Opener: As a warm-up, the teacher should post on the smart board the survey of Do

    you like applesauce? as a visual reminder to the student of what they have been working on the past week. The teacher should ask the students to

    remind her of the 3 options the student could have used to record their data collections. The teacher should display an example of each while the

    students are describing. Finally, the teacher should be expecting the vocabulary that the students have been learning for the past week to come

    up. If it does not enter the conversation, the teacher should probe the

    students to bring up the vocabulary. For example, the teacher could say, What is another word for this chart? looking for the word, survey. The

    vocabulary that the teacher should be looking for is survey, data, and response.

    App. 5 mins

    Launch:

    During the explore portion of the Sharing Do you like? surveys, the

    students are expected to participate in administering surveys to their peers with the question they came up with starting with, Do you like? Because

    this is the 2nd day of the students surveying each other, certain students may be already finished with their first survey. These students are expected

  • to come up with another question that starts with Do you like? The

    students should be encouraged to try using a different method than they did the first time when collecting their data. The expectations are the same as

    they were in the days before. They are allowed to work in partners if they wish, but its their choice. If students are finishing their surveys, but do not

    have time to start another survey (or if they are not interested in starting another survey), there is an early finisher activity, Fun Counting

    Worksheet for them to work on while the rest of the student survey. After all students have had time an adequate amount of time to finish their first

    surveys, approximately 15 minutes, the class should reconvene to discuss their completely surveys. The students are expected to bring their recording

    sheets with them. As a model, the teacher will describe a survey answering

    the questions, What did you ask?, What did you find out?, How many people said yes and how many said no?, and How many people responded

    with a different answer? The teacher should write these questions on the smart board or white board so that students can refer to them in case they

    forget once they get to the front of the room. Before sending the students up to the front, the teacher should use a quick questioning strategy called,

    Reasonable/unreasonable and why? The teacher should write this question on chart paper. The teacher will write, I found out that 1000 students like

    applesauce. Reasonable/unreasonable and why? Students should be able to respond to this and explain why they think it is unreasonable. Students will

    then share their surveys. The teacher should allow as many students to go as time allows. If certain students are unable to share their survey due to

    time, the teacher should make sure they know they will be able to share their survey during the next class meeting.

    App. 30 minutes

    Explore:

    A. - Expect students to have issues with receiving responses that are not yes

    or no but Maybe, I dont know, and/or I cant decide. Certain students maybe struggle with these responses and not know how to record

    them and become stuck. Certain students might chose not to record them at all, while others may become confused. The teacher should be prepared

    to help by thinking through what they can do with the response. For

    example the teacher could suggest adding another category, or using a different color for any responses outside of yes or no.

    -Expect students to realize during the surveying time that their chosen

    method is in fact not as effective as they had planned. These students might become frustrated and want to give up after realizing that their

    method is not working. The teacher should be prepared to help them modify their strategy. For example, the teacher could suggest taking what they

    have learned from their first method and starting from there with a new

  • strategy. The teacher could also ask what they think they could do different

    from here on and tell them to make the change and keep going. The teacher should make sure these students know that making changes is ok

    but acceptable.

    -Expect students to be uncomfortable sharing their survey results with the whole class. In this case, the teacher should be prepared by writing the

    questions on the smart board/whiteboard before hand and consistently reminding the students what they are expected to do while sharing. This

    should hopefully help those certain students who might be nervous they will forget the questions once they get in front of the class. The teacher should

    also clarify the expectations of the entire class while someone is presenting.

    The students should be aware that they are to be respectful and listen to each and every student.

    B. During the first portion of the lesson, the teacher should be paying close

    attention to the students while they are surveying each other. It is very important that the students are working towards collecting data. The

    teacher should take note of the students who are describing the information they see from the responses from their survey. The teacher should be

    paying attention to those students who are not able to describe the information they are getting from the responses. It is very important for the

    teacher to take note of these students because they are the ones who should be given extra attention and support.

    During the sharing part of the lesson, the teacher should be taking notes on

    the students who are not able to describe their surveys correctly. Those

    students who are still having issues with asking the correct type of question and who are unable to accurately describe their collected data will need to

    be addressed with extra support.

    C. The formative assessment strategies I will be using in this lesson are:

    1. Review and Critique Anonymous Student Work: During the lesson when the students are reminding the teacher of the three types of methods for

    collecting data. The students can either describe the strategy first, then the teacher will hold up a pre-made example of that type, or the teacher can

    hold up an example, then the students explain which it is.

    2. Key Points: During the class discussion when the teacher and students go over the different possible strategies that were used in the surveying. The

    teacher discusses with the students the key points of the lesson concerning

    the fact that students should be able to get information from looking at their data collection. Key points if also taking place when the teacher is writing

    down on the board exactly what questions need to be answered when the

  • students are sharing their surveys to the class.

    3. Centers: During the surveying time of the lesson, if a students is having

    trouble working alone, the teacher can suggest to the student, Would you like us to find you a friend to work with? This way a student, who feels

    more confident with surveys, whether they are still working or already finished, can be a support system to the student who is having troubles.

    This method might be more helpful to those students who want to keep working but do not want the teacher helping them with every step.

    D. For differentiation, in the surveying part of the lesson, an extension can

    be for students who are interested can do another survey. They can choose

    a different Do you like? question or another type of question, using the same, similar, or different method. Another option for the students who

    finish early is working on an earlier finisher activity called, Fun Counting Worksheet

    In the sharing part of the lesson, some English language learners might be more comfortable sharing with the whole class if they have a chance to

    preview ahead of time the questions about the survey results you are going to ask them. The teacher should encourage them to listen closely to the

    questions, and to other students answers to them, during these initial presentations. If ELLs need additional reinforcement the teacher can gather

    them in a small group and give them a chance to practice their responses in preparation for the next session.

    E. Early finisher, Fun Counting Worksheet is attached at the back of the

    lesson plan.

    Summarize:

    A. The students will be sharing the results from their exploration when they are displaying and describing their survey to the rest of the class.

    They will be answering 4 questions. First, they will explain the question that they chose to ask their peers beginning with Do you

    like? Next, they will answer, and What did you find out? Finally, they will describe, How many people said yes and how many people

    said no? How many people responded with a different answer?

    B. The key mathematical ideas that must come out in the sharing are

    that the students are able to interpret results to a data investigation. They will show they are able to do this by describing their survey

    accurately according to the questions they are asked to answer. The students will show they can compare between the number of students

    saying yes, no, or another answers all together.

    C. For the check for understanding portion, in the final discussion/wrap

  • up the teacher should ask the students to tell what you know. For

    example, the teacher will say to the students tell what you know about surveys, tell what you know about data, or tell what you

    know about responses.

    App. 4 minutes

    Application:

    For homework, the lesson will be extending to focus more sharply on analyzing by sending home a worksheet called, Jacks Survey that deals

    with the concept of getting information from a survey. During the next lesson, the students will be sharing their survey data collection and will be

    expected to use data to solve a problem, so this worksheet will be practice for comparing and describing the data they will find.

  • Mathematics Lesson 5 Grade _Kindergarten_

    Name of Unit: Data Projects

    Name of Lesson: Solving a Problem Using Attendance Data

    Prerequisite Knowledge: The students have been working on recording and describing information found from data in the last few lessons. The students

    have been focusing on interpreting data through answering questions given by the teacher.

    Learning Targets (Goals) (Understand that) -Students should understand how to make a representation of a set of data

    -Students should understand how to solve a problem using data -Students should be able to interpret results of a data investigation

    Success Criteria (I can)

    -I can figure out how many students are in my class by knowing how many are absent

    -I can use data to solve problems -I can get information from looking at my finished survey

    Process Standards (Problem Solving, Communication, Connections, Reasoning and Proof, Representations)

    Problem Solving: Students are using problem solving by being given a

    challenge by the teacher to figure out how many students we have in the classroom by being given the total number of students and the number of

    students who are absent. The students will be using their problem solving skills to figure out the answer.

    Communication: The students will be using communication through using models and strategies that will show the teacher how they are trying to

    solve the problem that was posed. The students, who were unable to present their Do you like? survey on the previous day are also using

    communication through sharing and describing their surveys to the class.

    Connections: The students will be using connections in this lesson when taking the attendance of the class and connecting it to a mathematical

    problem. The students are to be using mathematical strategies and models to connect the math concepts to the real life question.

    Reasoning and Proof: The students are using reasoning and proof during this

    lesson through displaying the models to the teachers of how they are planning to solve the problem posed. The model shows their reasoning to

  • what they are trying to do, as well as shows proof to why their reasoning

    makes sense.

    Representations: Students are using representations in this lesson through the models that they are working with to describe how they are solving the

    problem. They are using counters, cubes, or other materials to represent their classmates who are present and who are absent. The students are also

    using the models to present mathematical strategies of addition and/or subtraction.

    Materials and Preparation:

    - Investigations in number, data, and space. Sorting and Surveys. Data Analysis. Unit 7. Grade K. (2008).

    -Solving a Problem Using Attendance Data: Data Projects: pages 114-118 -Materials for creating data representations such as connecting cubes,

    buttons, dot stickers, counters -Students completely recording of their survey responses

    -Early Finisher (1 per student) -Homework/practice handout (1 per student)

    Warm-up/Opener: This day is an important assessment day for this unit so the teacher is going

    to start out with some questioning strategies for the students to respond to. The questioning strategies that are to be asked should be aligned to what

    the student have been working on in the past lessons. The teacher should start out by writing on the white board or smart board, What are you doing

    this Saturday? The teacher should read to the students the question and say, This is an appropriate Do you like? survey question. Do you agree

    or disagree, and why? The teacher should take an appropriate amount of responses, making sure that student know they must explain their reasoning

    for agreeing or disagreeing. The teacher will then have the students participate in a Fit the Condition activity. The teacher will say, everyone

    is now to come up with an appropriate survey question that is asking for

    only yes or no answers. The teacher will again take an appropriate amount of responses from students. The teacher should try to call on

    students who did not get a chance to answer in the first questioning strategy. The teacher will then have a small discussion with students amount

    finding that we can get information from data touching base on the vocabulary of data reminding students the definition if needed. The

    teacher will then explain that today we will be using data again, but this time to help solve a problem.

    App. 5-6 min.

    Launch:

  • During the explore portion of this lesson the students will be given a

    problem concerning the attendance of the class. As a daily routine, the class takes attendance, where the teacher counts the number of students in the

    class. Today instead of counting the students, the teacher is going to explain to the students that theyre going to think about attendance as a

    mathematical problem, starting with the number of people in the class. The teacher will let the students know that there are 25 students in the class

    when everyone is present. Depending on the number of students absent, the teacher will tell them the number. For example, Today four students

    are not here. The problem is this. How many students are here in class today? Your job is to figure out this problem. You can use some of these

    materials to help you. The teacher will then show the students the materials

    available. The teacher should explain to the students that they need to figure out a way to show their work on paper when they are finished solving

    the problem. The teacher should explain to the students that one way to solve the problem is by counting everyone like the teacher does daily, but

    that there are other ways to use the information they have to solve the problem. The students are expected to work individually on this problem.

    The students should be encouraged to be creative, using models (such as cubes or counters), pictures, or drawings to help solve the problem. As the

    students begin to finish solving the problem, the teacher can check out to see what they have done. If the teacher feels like the student has

    accurately solved the problem, they can give the students an early finisher, Count the Number of Tally Marks to work on while the other students in

    the class keep working on their solutions. After the students have had an adequate amount of time to work on solving the problem, approximately (15

    minuets), the class should reconvene and be ready to listen to the rest of

    the Do you like? survey presentations. The students who were not able to present in the last class can now share their survey, answering the same

    questions as the rest of the class. The questions include, What did you ask and what did you find out?, How many people said yes and how many said

    no?, and Did anyone say anything different than yes or no? What did you do about that?

    App. 30 minutes

    Explore:

    A. -Expect the students to have trouble getting started with the problem. If

    this is the first time they have confronted a problem like this on their own, they might need extra support. The teacher should be prepared to help

    these students by making sure they understand the problem they are trying to solve. The teacher can help with this by asking the students to retell the

    problem. When the students say the problem to themselves out loud, many

  • times it will make more sense to them.

    -Expect students to have issues being able to show how they solved the

    problem. The teacher should be prepared for this by being ready to ask the student to explain what they did and work together as a class to come up

    with a representation of their strategy.

    -Expect students to have issues showing an action on paper. For example, if a student uses blocks to represent 25 students and taking away four, they

    might have problems showing that on paper. The teacher should be prepared for this by working with the student to think about how they might

    show this solution. An example might be drawing the 25 blocks and then

    crossing out four of them.

    B. During the first portion of the lesson, when the students are solving the problem based on attendance, the teacher should be taking notes on which

    of the students are unable to solve the problem with the given information. These students who are having trouble will need some extra support from

    the teacher or peers. During the same time, the teacher should also take down names of the students who are effectively solving the problems with

    ease. These students will need an extension or can be used as a peer teacher for the students who are having troubles solving the problem.

    During the sharing part of the lesson, the teacher should be taking notes on

    the students who are not able to describe their surveys correctly. Those students who are still having issues with asking the correct type of question

    and who are unable to accurately describe their collected data will need to

    be addressed with extra support.

    C. The formative assessment strategies that I will be using during this lesson include:

    1. Questioning Strategies at the beginning of the lesson during the warm-

    up. The strategies include Agree/Disagree and Fit the Condition. These questioning strategies will help the teacher see what the

    students know and what they are still having problems with dealing with surveys.

    2. Sentence Starters in the closing of the lesson when the teacher will ask the students to finish the following sentence, The most important

    thing to remember about surveys is The endings of the sentences that the students will give will show the teacher what they learned

    about surveys and what important terms and concepts they remember

    about the surveys they made. 3. Centers during the portion of the lesson when the students are

    working on solving the posed problem concerning the attendance of

  • the classroom. The teacher may have students who have already

    finished and feel confident on their abilities help the students who are having trouble getting started.

    D. For differentiation, for students who are unsure of how to solve the

    problem, the teacher should help them break it into parts. The teacher might ask questions such as: How many students are in our class? How

    could you show that? How many of those students are absent today? How could you show that? So then how many people are here today? These

    types of questions should help break down the problem for the students in a more attainable way. For students who are advancing through the problem

    more quickly than others, they are offered an early finisher activity called,

    Count the Number of Tally Marks.

    Another way to help students who are unsure of what is being asked of them, the teacher can have the students retell the problem to the teacher.

    By saying the problem by out loud themselves, many times the students will better understand what is being asked.

    E. Early finisher, Count the Number of Tally Marks is attached at the back

    of the lesson plan.

    Summarize: D. During the problem solving part of the lesson, the students are sharing

    the results of their exploration through the models, pictures, or drawings that they making to solve the problem. The teacher will be

    walking around asking the students what they are thinking when they are solving the problem. During the sharing portion of the lesson, the

    students will be sharing the results from their exploration when they are displaying and describing their survey to the rest of the class.

    They will be answering 4 questions. First, they will explain the question that they chose to ask their peers beginning with Do you

    like? Next, they will answer, and What did you find out? Finally, they will describe, How many people said yes and how many people

    said no? How many people responded with a different answer?

    E. The key mathematical ideas that must come out in the sharing portion are that the students are able to identify and represent data needed to

    solve the problem, be able to solve the problem accurately, and represent how they are solving the problem.

    F. The check for understanding question will be asking the students about their survey experience. The teacher should end the discussion

    by asking students to talk about the experience of their surveys. The teacher should ask questions such as, What advice do you have for

    each other about how to do surveys? What would you do differently

  • next time?

    Application:

    For homework, the lesson will be extending to focus more sharply on using given data to answer a question by sending home a worksheet called,

    Learning to Read Graphs 2 that deals with the concept of finding

    information from given data. During the next lesson, the students will be sharing their problem solutions through using given data, so this worksheet

    will be practice for answering a question based on using given data.

  • Name__________________ Tell more about what you know!

    1. Circle the best Do you like? survey question. a. What is your favorite color? b. Do you like the Hawkeyes? c. How old are you?

    2. Who has fewer? How do you know?

    Cindys cube train Timmys cube train

    3. What can you find out from Trudys

    survey?

    Do you like meatballs? Matthew: Yes Sarah: No

    Andrew: No Mark: Yes

    Timmy: No Beth: Yes

    Cindy: Yes Tristan: Yes

    Tammy: Yes Abby: Yes

  • 4. How many of her friends like meatballs? How many of her friends do not like meatballs?

    Do you like meatballs? Matthew: Yes Sarah: No

    Andrew: No Mark: Yes

    Timmy: No Beth: Yes

    Cindy: Yes Tristan: Yes

    Tammy: Yes Abby: Yes

    5. Who has fewer? Michael Bethany

    6. Bonus!!! How many students are in our class when everyone is here??

    4

    8