Top Banner
ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report Page 1 Project contract no. 036851 ESONET European Seas Observatory Network Instrument: Network of Excellence (NoE) Thematic Priority: 1.1.6.3 – Climate Change and Ecosystems Sub Priority: III – Global Change and Ecosystems Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS, Yellow Pages) Due date of deliverable: month 46 Issued: February 2011 (Month 48) Start of project: March 2007 Duration: 48 months Project Coordinator: Roland PERSON Coordinator Organisation name: IFREMER, France Work Package 6 Lead Authors: J M Miranda (FFCUL) Contributing authors: J F Rolin (IFREMER), N O’Neill (SLR), K. Schleisiek (SEND) Revision: Version: 1.0, 15 th April 2011 Project co-funded by the European Commission within the Sixth Framework Programme (2002-2006) Dissemination Level PU Public PP Restricted to other programme participants (including the Commission Services) RE Restricted to a group specified by the consortium (including the Commission Services) CO Confidential, only for members of the consortium (including the Commission Services)
17

Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

Feb 04, 2022

Download

Documents

dariahiddleston
Welcome message from author
This document is posted to help you gain knowledge. Please leave a comment to let me know what you think about it! Share it to your friends and learn new things together.
Transcript
Page 1: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 1 

 

Project contract no. 036851 ESONET European Seas Observatory Network

Instrument: Network of Excellence (NoE)

Thematic Priority: 1.1.6.3 – Climate Change and Ecosystems Sub Priority: III – Global Change and Ecosystems

Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS, Yellow Pages)

 

 

Due date of deliverable: month 46 Issued: February 2011 (Month 48)

Start of project: March 2007 Duration: 48 months Project Coordinator: Roland PERSON Coordinator Organisation name: IFREMER, France Work Package 6 Lead Authors: J M Miranda (FFCUL) Contributing authors: J F Rolin (IFREMER), N O’Neill (SLR), K. Schleisiek (SEND)

Revision: Version: 1.0, 15th April 2011

Project co-funded by the European Commission within the Sixth Framework Programme (2002-2006)

Dissemination Level

PU Public

PP Restricted to other programme participants (including the Commission Services)

RE Restricted to a group specified by the consortium (including the Commission Services)

CO Confidential, only for members of the consortium (including the Commission Services)

Page 2: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 2 

 

Contents 

1. Objectives of the WP:............................................................................................................. 3

2. Core services stakeholders..................................................................................................... 3

2.1 Relation with GMES and GEOSS ....................................................................................... 3

2.2 Sectorial Analysis.............................................................................................................. 3

2.2.1 Oceanographic Monitoring ....................................................................................... 3

2.2.2 Seismological Networks ............................................................................................ 4

2.2.3 Tsunami and Earthquake Early Warning Systems..................................................... 4

2.2.4 Environmental Protection and Conservation............................................................ 4

2.3 Relationships with the Industry ....................................................................................... 4

2.4 Esonet Label ..................................................................................................................... 8

3. Regional services stakeholders .............................................................................................. 8

4. Promotion and SME policy ..................................................................................................... 8

4.1 PESOS................................................................................................................................ 8

4.2 ESONET Yellow Pages ..................................................................................................... 10

4.2.1 The concept............................................................................................................. 10

4.2.2 Schedule .................................................................................................................. 11

4.2.3 Structure of EYP....................................................................................................... 11

4.2.4 System Administration ............................................................................................ 12

5. ESONEWS.............................................................................................................................. 12

5.1 Scope of the Newsletter................................................................................................. 12

5.2 Issues .............................................................................................................................. 13

Annex 1: PESOS newsletter ...................................................................................................... 15

 

Page 3: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 3 

 

1. Objectives of the WP6: The  objectives  of  this  work  package  are  (a)  the  promotion  of  the  need  of  subsea observatories,  disseminating  the  results  of  ESONET  NoE  and  (b)  the  establishment of permanent  links  to  socio‐economic  users.  These  objectives  ask  for  the  development  of stronger links between the present and future stakeholders of ESONET, the dissemination to the large public of the state‐of‐the‐art of the network and the promotion of the harmonious development  of  the  different  regional  infrastructures  vis‐à‐vis  the  different  user communities, with an emphasis on the connection between ESONET and the private sector and searching beyond the marine sector for new partnerships. 

In this report we will recall briefly the work developed under the work‐package and we will focus on two topics: PESOS and ESONET YELLOW PAGES. 

2. Core services stakeholders CORE SERVICES of ESONET are defined as a number of data products and data services which will  be  provided  by  the  future  operational  network  on  a  stable  basis  and  with  enough standardization to be used as basic input for global players in the fields of Earth Monitoring. 

Stakeholders were identified in the following areas:  

- Oceanographic Monitoring (Physical and Biological parameters), 

- Seismological Networks, 

- Tsunami Early Warning Systems, 

- Biodiversity assessment, 

- Education and Training,  

- Environmental protection, conservation and restoration or mitigation monitoring. 

Core  Services  address  a  specific  category  of  stakeholders which  can  be  private,  profit  or nonprofit organizations that have the means and the interest to buy information, services or equipment  developed  by  ESONET.  These  organizations may  be  at  national,  regional,  and international  levels and  financed by  their membership, commercial activity or government subsidies. 

2.1 Relation with GMES and GEOSS The relation between ESONET and MyOcean Marine core service of GMES was  initiated by the coordinator of the network Roland Person. In order to manage the  link with GMES  in a general way, the coordination team wrote a support document to be presented to MyOcean project for the Marine Core Service of GMES and PREVIEW project for Emergency Response Core Service. This document was included in Deliverable D16. 

2.2 Sectorial Analysis 

2.2.1 Oceanographic Monitoring ESONET/EMSO as a European Network of deep sea observatories will significantly contribute 

Page 4: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 4 

 

to  Oceanographic  Monitoring.  This  will  be  done  by  providing  a  series  of  long  term observations  concerning  all  nodes  integrated  in  the  network, with  a  pre‐defined  quality level. ESONET observatories will contribute to Marine Core Services data collecting networks for four of the areas  identified by Marine Core Services of GMES: Global 0cean; North East Atlantic;  Arctic  and Mediterranean  Sea.  The  parameters which will  be  addressed  at  the central  level  will  be  a  function  of  the  existence  of  a  basic  sensor  payload  or,  as  an alternative, a consequence of the technical choices being made by the regional legal bodies, most probably Departments of the EMSO ERIC. 

2.2.2 Seismological Networks Seismological  observations  in  Europe  are  conducted  by member  state’s  institutes, with  a small  level of cooperation across national boundaries. Two  initiatives have  increased  their importance: EMSC  (Euro‐Mediterranean Seismological Center) which coordinates near‐real time  operation,  earthquake  detection  and  rapid  dissemination  of  events,  and  ORFEUS (Observatories and Research Facilities  for European Seismology), a non‐profit organization that  archives  and  disseminates  waveform  seismic  data.  Both  initiatives  lack  significantly marine based stations. 

ESONET (or better EMSO) will be the natural partner to provide marine seismological data. This will  be  done  in  cooperation with  a  parallel  initiative  called  EPOOS  (European  Plate Observing  System)  recently  integrated  in  the  roadmap  of  ESFRI,  that  aims  to  integrate geophysical monitoring networks  (e.g.  seismic networks),  local observatories  (e.g. volcano observatories) and experimental laboratories in Europe and adjacent region. 

2.2.3 Tsunami and Earthquake Early Warning Systems Tsunami  Early Warning  systems  are organized under  the umbrella of UNESCO  as  a  set of regional systems, covering the ocean basins where tsunami risk is relevant. Considering the geographical  coverage  of  ESONET  nodes,  the  cooperation will  be made with NEAMTWS; North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System and the relevant nodes are: Cadiz, Ligurian, East Sicily, Hellenic and Marmara Sea. 

2.2.4 Environmental Protection and Conservation The establishment of Marine Protected Areas under  the Habitats Directive established  the requirement for nation states to protect these areas from the harmful impact of commercial activities such as  fishing and oil and gas exploration and production. This creates the need for  the  development  of  deep‐seafloor  monitoring  capacities  which  can  be  fulfilled  by ESONET/EMSO  initiative or can be articulated with  it,  in the sense of mobile deep seafloor monitoring devices, provided  an Emergency  subsea observatory  (included  in ESONET as a complete site) is ready for deployment. 

2.3 Relationships with the Industry Within ESONET  the private  sector acts as a  “client” and as a  “supplier”. One of  the  fields where deep‐sea observatories are of  large  interest  is oil  industry, due to the needs related with the exploration of hydrocarbon resources in the deep seafloor. In this sense, meetings 

Page 5: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 5 

 

with  oil  industry  were  held  in  Brussels  November  26th  2008.  Twenty  six  participants attended the meeting, including representatives of the EC, ESONET NoE and EMSO PP, Shell, BP and Total, and several ESONET partners, including the coordination team. 

A  major  topic  addressed  concerned  the  requirements  for  strategic  environmental assessments  related  to  oil  exploration  in  the  deep  marine.  The  requirements  for environmental  impact assessments and  the obligations  relating  to marine protected areas were  also  reviewed.  Interviews  with  state  agencies  and  oil  companies  established  the current environmental protection and conservation duties of the commercial activities in the ocean  and  the  state  responsibilities.  This  approach  established  both  the minimum  core services  and  the  stakeholders  who  will  require  these  core  services.  Research  on  the implications  of  decommissioning  was  carried  out  and  a  report  on  the  liabilities  and indemnities produced.  

A specific initiative was taken by a group of ESONET scientists as a result of their experience and of  the Deepwater Horizon  incident  in  the Gulf of Mexico. The  following  “Community Statement was presented during the Esonet NoE General Assembly in Marseille. It is planned to be issued and promoted during the first half of 2011. 

 

Community Statement on Monitoring in Areas of Hydrocarbon Activity in the Deep Sea 

We  recommend  that  regulations be  considered which  require  in  situ monitoring  in areas  of  industry  activity.  Fishing,  mineral  and  hydrocarbon  exploration  and extraction  can  have  long‐term  impacts  on  the  seabed  and  in  the  water  column, especially in the case of accidents. Policies to enable sustainable industrial activity are maturing  and  here we  highlight  both  need  and  potential  for  improved monitoring related to the hydrocarbon industry.  

• Industrial operations in the deep sea lack independent human witnesses. 

• Open access observing systems to monitor industrial activity provide a means to increase the ability to understand and verify impacts.  

• It  is now feasible for future  industrial operators to  install real‐time observing and  sensing  systems  at  appropriate  locations  around  the  area  of  potential impact.  

Observing  systems  can  operate  before  and  throughout  the  period  of  industrial activity,  as  well  as  during  decommissioning.  Imagery  and  data  can  be  publically available  for  interpretation by  independent scientific experts. Such systems can help differentiate  natural  vs.  anthropogenic  variation  and  would  have  greatly  aided management of  the Deepwater Horizon  incident  in  the Gulf of Mexico. Feasibility  is indicated by  the already  existing deep‐sea  sensor networks used  in marine  science and hydrocarbon production management.  

Several  national  and  European  programs  have  already  considered  key  aspects  of monitoring  in  the  deep  sea  such  as what  to measure  and  how.  The DELOS  (Deep 

Page 6: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 6 

 

Ocean Environmental Long Term Observatory System) project has already begun such monitoring in an oil field offshore Angola through an international cooperative effort between  industrial and  research groups. The design  concepts developed  in ESONET and other  such observatory efforts  can  inform  industrial monitoring. These designs allow for data to flow from the seafloor in a plug‐and‐work mode into internet based networks  that  facilitate  early  warning,  data  discovery,  and  archiving.  Sensors  for temperature,  conductivity  (salinity),  pressure  (depth),  currents,  turbidity,  dissolved oxygen,  pan  and  tilt  high‐definition  video,  and  passive  acoustics  are  all  widely considered as standard in deep‐sea observatory systems. Multiple types of sensors for hydrocarbons have also become commercially available including fluorometers, mass spectrometers, and other optical sensors. These instruments can be situated together in a  frame  that  can occupy  little more  than  two  cubic meters,  can be  set  to  stand alone or mounted to already planned infrastructures, and can be serviced annually by Remotely Operated Vehicles. Additional sensors and samplers can be brought to bear depending on foreseen requirements.  

Information  should  be  available  from  these  monitoring  systems  in  real  time  and publicly  available.  A  framework  to  register  sensors  and  track  standards  and  data provenance  has  also  been  developed.  The  dissemination  of  information  can  occur through  already  developed  or  developing  standards  including  Open  Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) suite of standards. These standards allow for accessibility of data through already existing data centres. 

Recognizing the strategic importance of access to deep‐water production sites to both industry  and  societies  internationally  we  suggest  that  high‐level  negotiation  to include  these  ideas  into developing policy and  regulation begin as soon as possible. This urgency also bears in mind that the earlier such plans can be included into subsea infrastructure design, the  lower cost related to  implementation. The Group on Earth Observation  (GEO) and  the United Nations Convention on  the  Law of  the Sea offer possible  frameworks  to  facilitate  broad  and  consistent  consideration  and  action through higher‐level discussions and dissemination of agreed  terms  to  regional and national stakeholders.  

Data from in situ industrial monitoring can combine with data from satellites, climate, and quantitative models to not only understand industry impact, but also understand ocean  and  earth  change more  broadly.  By  being  openly  available  the  data  could combine  with  other  information  streams  and  help  form  part  of  the  Global  Earth Observation System of Systems  (GEOSS) and Global Monitoring of Environment and Security (GMES). 

Possible interested parties: 

Deep‐ocean Environmental Long‐term Observatory System (DELOS) 

European Seas Observatory NETwork (ESONET) 

European Science Foundation Marine Board 

Oslo  and  Paris  Conventions  for  the  protection  of  the marine  environment  of  the 

Page 7: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 7 

 

North‐East Atlantic (OSPAR) Commission 

United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) 

Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) 

Ocean Leadership 

European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO) 

UN International Seabed Authority (ISA) 

UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) 

UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) 

UK National Oceanography Centre (NOC) 

US  Department  of  the  Interior’s  (DOI),  Bureau  of  Ocean  Energy  Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) 

European Commission Directorate General Research Energy 

European Commission Directorate General Research Environment 

European Marine Safety Agency (EMSA) 

Ministry of Petroleum and Energy (OED)  

Norwegian Oil Industry Association (OLF)  

Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD)  

Norwegian Pollution Control Authority (SFT)  

CEDRE 

Province of Azores 

Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) 

Industry Technology Facilitator (ITF) 

International Association of Drilling Contractors 

Oil Spill Response 

Oil & Gas UK 

BP 

Total 

StatoilHydro 

Shell 

BG 

Chevron 

ExxonMobil 

Page 8: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 8 

 

Petrobras 

Transocean 

2.4 Esonet Label ESONET  label  was  planned  to  certify  the  good  practices  on  the  technological  or methodological choices to be made by subsea observatory community. Esonet Label aims to characterize:  

- Technical Auditing; 

- Standardization;  

- Quality Assurance; 

- Equipment Testing and sensor calibration; 

- Inter‐comparison of technical equipment from providers; 

- Technical data acquisition for reliability analysis; 

- Follow‐up of equipment to detect obsolete technical components; 

- LEE assessment and council. 

ESONET Label was a transverse task addressed in WP2 (interoperability) at first and finally in all WPs under supervision of WP8 (coordination). 

3. Regional services stakeholders  The organization of the regional services stakeholders has been mainly driven by WP5. Some of  the partners  (e.g.  INGV)  made  progresses  concerning  the  existing  sites (NEMO‐SN1). Contacts  were  made with  prospective  partners  or  suppliers  in  Sweden  (AMLAB, Swedish Meteorological  and  Hydrological  Institute), Norway  (Aanderaa  Data  Instruments) etc... 

The preliminary  identification of the Stakeholders of the Regional Observatories was made still during ESONET CA project and was re‐organized as Deliverable D2 of Esonet NoE.  

4. Promotion and SME policy   

4.1 PESOS During  the  preparation  phase  of  ESONET  a  stable  association  called  PESOS  (Group  of Providers of Equipment and Services for Observatory Systems) was foreseen as an important step towards a better integration of SME in the future network. 

The promotion of PESOS was firstly made by SLR (Ex‐CSA) during the Oceans 07 at Aberdeen with  a  presentation  entitled  “Industry  Meets  the  Challenge  of  Deep  Ocean  Scientific Research”. Direct contacts were made with most of the private companies dealing with deep seafloor instrumentation or services. Several dozens of companies expressed their interest. 

During  the Barcelona All Region Workshop 1 on  the 7th of September 2007,  the group of 

Page 9: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 Page 9 

 

private  companies  inside  ESONET NoE  expressed  the  idea  of  opening  this  group  to more companies from a broader scope of industrial fields.  

This was the main objective of the meeting to be held in London during OI’08. The meeting in London took place on March 11th with ESONET  industrial partners and other companies interested  in  ESONET.  The  cooperation  with  the  industry  was  further  discussed  in  the framework of  the MODOO project  to  find  synergies  and  technical  solutions  for  long‐term monitoring of optical properties (turbidity) and conductivity cells. This discussion resulted in the  agreement  that  a  state‐of‐the‐art  multi‐sensor  probe  (an  advanced  Generic  Sensor Module) could be used for free during the Demo Missions. 

Exchange  of  information  and  experience  between  private  companies  and  ESONET community took place during the meetings  in Algarve  (General Assembly 2008).  Important actions  were  developed  by  the  private  sector  (FUGRO)  towards  major  Norwegian universities,  institutes,  technology  companies  and  Statoil‐Hydro  to  plan  and  develop underwater observatories to be located in Norwegian waters. 

There  is  a  growing  interest  of  private  companies  in  seafloor  observation.  The  number  of companies,  that  are  now  suppliers  to  existing  cabled  observatories  (such  as  NEMO  and Neptune),  is growing as  is the awareness of ESONET demonstration projects and ESONET’s future  plans.  This was  apparent  at  the Ocean Business  2009 Conference  in  Southampton where  more  than  fifty  exhibitors  were  visited  by  a  member  of  the  ESONET  NoE, concentrating on  suppliers of modems, ADCPs, backscatter, bioacoustics, camera  systems, CTDs,  CH4  sensors  and  current meters.  The  objective was  to  find  out what  new  sensor technology was available and how well advanced known sensor suppliers were in developing titanium  cased modules  rated  to greater  than 3,000m  for deep observatories. The  survey concentrated  on  European  companies. Where  the  technology  was  not manufactured  in Europe, Canadian companies were found with the appropriate sensor technology. European agents for US sensor technologies were identified where no European or Canadian supplier existed. 

A PESOS Meeting was held at Bremen, during the IEEE Ocean’s 09 meeting held in 11‐14 May 2009. Here the first release of EYP was presented and the feedback was very positive, with the  presence  of  dozens  of  representatives  of  the  private  sector.  The  role  of  the  EYP  to convey  information  on  existing  technology which  can  be  used  to  develop  the  submarine observatory network was emphasized and highly appreciated by the private sector. 

The  Interest  of  industry  increased  since  the  Esonet  Demonstration Missions.  As  a  result companies have become more pro‐active  in populating the yellow pages of ESONET Yellow Pages (see below). In June 2009 at the VISO Workshop in Tromsoe industry stakeholders of ESONET  formed a working group  to discuss how  the  service  companies and  customers of ESONET  observatories  could  contribute  to  the  implementation  of  ocean  observatories  in Europe. At the Steering Committee Meeting in Amsterdam in December 2009 this initiative was  followed  up  when  the  role  of  the  industry  core  services  stakeholders  in  the implementation plan for ESONET was defined. 

SEND  Off‐shore  company  produced  the  first  PESOS  newsletter,  which  was  mailed  to companies in Europe and wider. It is focused on standardization developments and ESONET 

Page 10: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 10 

 

Yellow Pages (see Annex 1). 

Autonomy of the private partners of Esonet has increased steadily since the beginning of the project. Presently  they directly manage  tools  like Esonet Yellow Pages  (see below)  initially developed by academic partners.  

An element  from  the private  sector entered  the ESONET  Steering Committee.  In  the  first year,  this commitment was guaranteed by Neville Hazell  from Alcatel.  In the second, third and forth year he was replaced by Thomas Buettgenbach from SEND Signal Elektronik GMbH and then by Klaus Schleisiek from Send off‐shore Electronics GMBh.  

 

4.2 ESONET Yellow Pages 

4.2.1 The concept The ESONET Yellow Pages aim to organize the information concerning available products for the  development  and  maintenance  of  Deep‐Sea  Observatories,  provided  by  the  private sector.  This  includes  a  range  of  equipment,  from  simple,  isolated  sensors  or  parts,  to communication systems or even integrated Observatories. 

 

 

 

Figure 1 – Webpage of Esonet Yellow Pages 

 

ESONET  Yellow  Pages  (EYP)  are  built  upon  a  database  with  descriptions  of  available products, as well as  information  from manufacturing companies  that design and assemble them.  In  this database, not only  the  technical specifications  (from stand‐alone  to complex inter‐operative systems) but also, compatibility and standardization requirements should be 

Page 11: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 11 

 

easily accessed in the descriptive synopsis of each item. 

EYP were developed using MYSQL, HTML, JavaScript and CSS. 

4.2.2 Schedule The development of Esonet Yellow Pages (EYP) was directed towards the organization of all information concerning sensors, systems and service providers relevant to the development of multidisciplinary  Seafloor  Observatories.  Information was  organized  as  a  database,  to ensure future compatibility with standardization procedures concerning in particular sensor ML description. Each product  is  fully  characterized by a  set of  characteristics  that allow a proper comparison between different market alternatives. 

Yellow pages layout was presented in Nice ESONET meeting, in 2008, and the first prototype was  linked  to ESONET webpage  in March 2009. The database and  the  specifications were prepared by  ESONET partners  and  the web development was  committed  to  a  third‐party company. A  final version of ESONET Yellow Pages was finished during 2009. Data were loaded and tuning of the database structure was achieved during 2009/2010.  During  2010  the  development  of  the  Yellow  Pages  was  a  priority:  Yellow  pages  were presented  at  the  Bremen  PESOS meeting  in  order  to  obtain  the  PESOS  group  feedback concerning the information stored and made available, the quality of the web interface and the  future  developments.  Esonet  Yellow  Pages were  implemented  in  a  stable way  in  the second half of 2010. 

4.2.3 Structure of EYP The first level of information regards “sensors”. Sensors are organized in categories: ADCPs, Conductivity,  CTDs,  Current  meters,  Depth,  DO  sensors,  Flow  meters,  Fluorometers, Geophones,  Hydrophones,  Magnetometers,  Multi‐parameters,  PAR  sensors,  pH  sensors, Pressure  sensors,  Redox,  Sediment  traps,  Temperature,  Tiltmeters,  Transmissometers, Turbidity and Water samplers. These categories and the structure of each category can be dynamically changed by a web interface opened only to high level users. 

The  second  level  of  information  regards  “hardware  components”  for  deep  sea observatories. It contains information on a set of devices, namely acoustic releases, cameras, connectors, etc… These devices are described in a way similar to sensors, and organized by categories: Acoustic  releases, Cameras, Connectors, Data  loggers, Floats, Housings, Lasers, Lights, Underwater batteries, Underwater cables, Underwater switches.  

The  third  level  of  information  regards  services.  This  level  is  still  under  construction  but intends  to  give  information  on  services  provided  by  the  private  sector  in  a  broad  view: hardware, data processing, operation, etc…, which are relevant to deep sea observatories. 

The forth level of information regards manufacturers. Here, information on the companies that are able  to provide equipment,  supplies or  services connected with  the objectives of ESONET  are  included. More  than  a hundred different manufacturers are already  included and correctly linked to the products they market. 

The amount of information is increasing continuously, together with the volume of users. In 

Page 12: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 12 

 

annex we  present  the  automatic  analysis  of  EYP  users. A  tool was designed  to  allow  the follow up of the user community. Results are presented in deliverable D17. 

4.2.4 System Administration System administration of EYP is needed because there is a need to manage the structure of the database whenever a different category or a different  type of  sensor or equipment  is inserted. This  is  the only way  to provide users with  structured  information,  in  such a way that they can really compare different alternatives existing in the market for a specific set of goods or services. 

 

 

Figure 2 – Interface for the administration of EYP site. 

 

5. ESONEWS 

5.1 Scope of the Newsletter One of the products of ESONET was designed as a Newsletter devoted to the dissemination of  (i)  the  importance of scientific  issues,  (ii)  the mastering of  the  technology and business plan, (iii) the role of political support for underwater observatories, (iv) the partnership with successful  implementations  in  North  America  and  Japan,  and  (v)  complementary  role  of ESONET  in  situ observation with  satellite, coastal  surface and  subsurface ocean  layer data collection. 

An issue of "ESONET News ‐ Europeans observe the deep sea" was planned to be produced every  3  months.  It  was  prepared  in  digital  form  and  distributed  to  a  large mailing  list prepared  by  ESONET  central  office.  Each  issue,  with  8  pages,  is  also  printed  to  be disseminated among partners and distributed in international meetings. 

The design and production of ESONEWS,  the newsletter of  the European Sea Observatory 

Page 13: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 13 

 

Network, has been developed and constantly improved.  Paper versions were prepared and disseminated by mail among partners.  All ESONEWS Newsletters intended  to spread basic information on ESONET  initiatives and basic aspects of  technology and  science associated with  deep  seafloor  observation.  Most  of  the  partners  of  ESONET  contributed  to  the Newsletter. 

 

 

Figure 3 – Final Layout of Esonews 

5.2 Issues Issues of ESONEWS  include  information on SMEs,  focused on  their potential contribute  to ESONET. The different  issues of ESONEWS gathered  cooperation  from a  series of ESONET partners (University of Lisbon, Send GmbH, Ifremer, INGV, CSA, IMI, University of Aberdeen, CNRS IN2P3‐Antares, nke, FUGRO‐Oceanor, University of Azores). 

Volume 1,  issue 1 of Esonews was devoted to the  launching of ESONET NoE  initiative. The second issue was devoted to the technological aspects of deep sea observatories. The third issue  was  dedicated  to  the  outcomes  of  ESONIM  project  and  centered  in  the  financial aspects of regional nodes. 

After a redesign of the Newsletter  layout, three  issues of Volume 2 of ESONEWS (Summer, Fall  and Winter  2008)  gathered  contributions  from  the  different  partners  and  SMEs  and focused on the main observatory technologies developed  in Europe (GEOSTAR, ASSEM and DELOS) were prepared. 

 

Page 14: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 14 

 

 

Figure 4 – Volumes 2 and 4 of Esonews 

 

Volume 3, issue 1 was dedicated to the Marmara and MomarD demo missions; Issue 2‐3 was a 16 page newsletter entirely dedicated to LOOME. Issue 4 was devoted to Neptune Canada, focusing on a major  step  in  the development of Ocean Sciences  in Canada:  the  launch of NEPTUNE Canada on 8 December 2009,  the world’s  first  regional‐scale underwater ocean observatory that plugs directly into the Internet. 

Volume 4,  issues 1 and 2 were dedicated  to  Interoperability. A  set of  texts  centered  in a critical  topic  for  subsea observatories, with experiences  from  the  teams which developed some of the observatory prototypes, in Europe and the US. 

These  issues  were  printed  (1500  samples  each)  and  distributed  by  post  to  the  ESONET community. The same newsletters were also distributed electronically as pdf  files  through ESONET webpage. 

Page 15: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 15 

 

Annex 1: PESOS newsletter 

Page 16: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 16 

 

Page 17: Project Deliverable D76 Final report on WP6 activities (PESOS

ESONET Contract no 036851 Work Package #6 Deliverable D76 Final Report

 

   

 

Page 17