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NATIONAL CONFERENCE of STATE LEGISLATURES | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | SLIDE 1 Presentation to CCSSO SCEE 2013 Legislative Review & 2014 Legislative Outlook January 14, 2014 Michelle Exstrom, Education Program Director
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Presentation to CCSSO SCEE. 2013 Legislative Review & 2014 Legislative Outlook. January 14, 2014 Michelle Exstrom, Education Program Director. Find this segment at 3:06 in the webinar recording. About NCSL. Instrumentality of all 50 state and territorial legislatures Bipartisan - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Presentation to CCSSO SCEE2013 Legislative Review & 2014 Legislative OutlookJanuary 14, 2014

Michelle Exstrom, Education Program DirectorNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #1About NCSLInstrumentality of all 50 state and territorial legislaturesBipartisanProvides research, technical assistance and opportunities to exchange ideas Advocates on behalf of legislatures before the federal governmentNCSL is committed to the success of state legislators and staff. Founded in 1975, we are a respected bipartisan organization providing states support, ideas, connections and a strong voice on Capitol Hill.Find this segment at 3:06 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #NO UMS.

NCSL CCSS Policy Position is stated policy to direct our federal level lobbying efforts.State legislators support voluntary state standards initiatives so long as they:Remain voluntaryState-led and State administeredFed. govt doesnt overstep its roleU.S. Dept. of Edu. doesnt condition receipt of fed. $ on state participation in common state effortsCauses for concern:U.S. Dept. of Ed. Race to the Top funds included common standards a criterion for eligibility$350 million in federal ARRA funds to develop the common assessments The federal government has a history of co-opting successful state policy

2Legislative Role in Teacher PolicyTeacher quality is the most influential school-related factor in student achievementState legislators spend a lot of time on teacher policyPreparationLicensure/CertificationRecruitment/RetentionInduction/MentoringProfessional DevelopmentEvaluationCompensation/Benefits

Find this segment at 5:28 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #First, lets take a look at the teaching quality policy and practice. Legislators know well that teachers matter most to student achievement. Research has shown time and time again that teachers are the most influential factor in whether students are successful academically. So, they tend to focus a great deal on legislation shoring up the teaching profession to ensure that we have the best teachers in the classroom, especially in low performing schools.

In considering teaching quality policy, I always strongly encourage legislators to look at the whole career continuum to ensure that your policies address the comprehensive career spectrum of teachers. This includes (see slide).3SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "National Public Education Financial Survey (NPEFS)," fiscal year 2010, provisional Version 1a.Find this segment at 07:18 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #Total Elementary-Secondary Education Expenditures: FY 2010

4SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "National Public Education Financial Survey (NPEFS)," fiscal year 2010, provisional Version 1a.All other expenditures: 32.9%Total Salary & Wages: 51.1%Total Employee Benefits: 16.0%In fiscal year 2010, total salary, wages and benefits =67.1% of all public elementary and secondary education expenditures in the United StatesOr about $420 billion (adjusted for inflation)

Find this segment at 07:58 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #Total Elementary-Secondary Education Expenditures: FY 2010

52013 Teacher Legislative EnactmentsTotal Teacher Enactments: 175 bills in 40 statesPreparation (40 bills in 20 states)Recruitment/Retention(27 bills in 18 states)Licensure/Certification (70 bills in 26 states)Induction and Mentoring (10 bills in 9 states)PD/Ongoing Learning (41 bills in 19 states)Compensation (43 bills in 25 states)Employment (101 bills in 26 states)

Source: http://www.ncsl.org/research/education/education-bill-tracking-database.aspx

Find this segment at 09:20 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide # Alternative education Data quality and privacy Resource realignment Etc.Find this segment at 22:32 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #I want to make clear that we all have a common definition of academic standards. There are of course a number of important policies impacted by the adoption of statewide academic standards, but throughout my presentation, and in referencing the Common Core State Standards, I want to be explicit that I am referencing the standards and not the body of policies that are guided by these standards. To begin, I would like to quote from a memorandum from the Wisconsin Legislative Fiscal Bureau to the Wisconsin legislatures Joint Committee on Finance:

Academic standards are benchmark measures that define what all students should know and be able to do in given academic subjects at each grade level. Standards are intended to ensure educational quality, as well as fairness, in that all students are expected to achieve certain minimum levels of knowledge, competence, and skill. Standards do not dictate curriculum or instruction, which is a prescribed learning plan including instructional content, resources, and materials and how teachers teach that content. However, standards are a foundation, driving a curriculum's design and concepts.

Or, more simply -- as a recent House Concurrent Resolution in Michigan related to Common Core implementation -- put it:

Education standards define minimum expectations of what students should know at the conclusion of a course of study but not the methods, curriculum, nor the entirety of what students are taught.7Successful Implementation of C&CR Standards = Examination of Current Teacher Policy Teacher PreparationTeacher Induction and MentoringTeacher Professional DevelopmentTeacher EvaluationFind this segment at 22:13 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #As states move forward with implementation of new C&CR standards and assessments, it will be very important to ensure that your teaching quality policies that youve put in place align. Sometimes this will require legislation, and in some cases this will require legislators to work with the state board or state and local departments of educations to ensure that teachers policies and practices are aligned.

You want to ensure that your institutions and authorized alternative certification programs are changing their curriculum and practice so that new teachers are well-versed in the new standards and have a full understanding of how practice needs to change. Will teachers understand how to implement deeper learning strategies so that students will be successful on the new assessments, and most importantly, in college and career? You will also want to ensure that these new teachers have the supports they need as they enter the classroom through robust and effective induction and mentoring programs.

You will want to ensure that veteran teachers have access to professional development so that they too are ready to shift their curriculum and practice as necessary to meet the new standards and for students to continue to succeed. This will require on-going, job embedded, data driven professional development not the one-time, two-hour long seminar that we know is not successful for any professional development.

And perhaps most importantly, you will want to ensure that your teacher evaluation system aligns with the new standards and assessments, but perhaps most importantly, that the timing aligns.

The bottom line is that if you want your state to successfully implement these changes, then you will need to ensure that teachers who we know are the most significant factor in student achievement are also well prepared for implementation. They are and will be on the front line of this effort.82013 CCSS Legislation by Topic AreaFind this segment at 23:50 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #As of September 16, 2013, legislatures in all buttwostates have filed a total oftwo hundred thirty-eight(238) unique bills andsixty-two(62) companion bills that address, even if tangentially, college- and career-readiness state standards.

From here, you can see that out of all of the legislation introduced related to CCSS, about 50 bills related to teachers. Approximately 30 of those were enacted.

9Outlook for 2014 LegislationTeacher Preparation Improving effectiveness through data (both traditional and alt cert); implementation of C&CR standards and assessments; teacher performance assessmentsTeacher LicensureTying licensure to new evaluations; teacher performance assessments; amending/adopting new teaching standards; tiered licensure/career laddersFind this segment at 26:34 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #Outlook for 2014 LegislationTeacher SupportsPD for C&CR standards and assessments; deeper learning; new accountability systems; evaluationsTeacher EvaluationsPilots and implementation; changing timelines and outcomesTeacher CompensationTiered licensure tied to compensation; performance-based compensation

Find this segment at 39:48 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #Student/Teacher Data Link

In order to determine student achievement, we need data points (summative/formative)

In order to determine teacher effectiveness, we need student data (growth model or value-added)Find this segment at 52:36 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #Now lets take a look at the issue of education data. We know that the collection and interpretation if student and teacher data is important. We live in a data-driven world, and the education system is now different. For example, teachers and administrators can use real-time data to make immediate instructional changes for struggling students and classrooms, and we can tell of a teacher is successful with a new instructional practice. Parents can use this data to make choices about which schools their students will attend, and states will soon determine whether teachers are effective in their practice or not.

We now can use it to determine the success of students and teachers for high stakes. So we know that the collection and analysis of data is important to the success of our education systems.12Student Data Privacy IssuesPrivacy Concerns: Seek AnswersState Legislation to Protect Student Data Privacy and/or Create Governance BodyMD Education Article 24-703 24-704; Creates a governance structure responsible for safeguarding privacy (http://mgaleg.maryland.gov/2014rs/statute_google/ged/24-703.pdf)OK HB 1989 - Student Data Accessibility, Transparency and Accountability Act of 2013 (http://www.oklegislature.gov/BillInfo.aspx?Bill=HB1989)Find this segment at 54:00 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #However, as we move forward in this data-driven education world, there are growing concerns over from parents, teachers, students, administrators and policymakers about whether the data we use is protected. As state legislators hear, and some share, these concerns, they are looking for examples of what they can do, as state legislators, to protect the data that is collected in their own state. We point you to two examples that experts agree are useful in this endeavor.13

Michelle Exstrommichelle.exstrom@ncsl.org303-856-1564Find this segment at 57:30 in the webinar recordingNational Conference of State Legislatures | www.ncsl.org | January 14, 2014 | Slide #14

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