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1 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012) Area profile for comment January 2013 Map based on information provided by and with the permission of the Western Australian Land Information Authority (Landgate), and the Australian Bureau of Statistics. ProfileNorth Metropolitan area Consultation Document
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North metropolitan area profile consultation document...Duncraig City of Joondalup $400 $620,000 Joondalup City of Joondalup $380 $470,000 Ocean Reef City of Joondalup $400 $700,000

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  • 1 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Map based on information provided by and with the permission of the Western Australian

    Land Information Authority (Landgate), and the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

    Profile—North Metropolitan area Consultation Document

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    2 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Consultation document

    The Disability Services Commission’s (DSC) vision is that all people live in welcoming

    communities that facilitate citizenship, friendship, mutual support and a fair go for everyone.

    To achieve this, Western Australia requires a responsive disability service sector to support

    people with disability, their families and carers to access more opportunities in the

    community.

    To meet this goal, the Commission in

    partnership with key stakeholders is

    creating a Sector Development Plan. Its

    purpose is:

    to provide further direction and

    targeted developmental

    opportunities across WA

    to ensure the disability services

    sector continues to evolve to meet

    the needs, goals and preferences

    of people with disability.

    Fifteen profile area documents have been

    created to cover all areas across WA.

    They combine existing information to

    create a picture of supports and services

    that make up the disability sector in each

    area. It provides a base of information to

    be validated or challenged by

    stakeholders.

    Feedback will add to our understanding of each area and how well supports and services

    match people’s needs. The consultation process will identify strengths and gaps in supports

    provided to people with disability in each area.

    Guiding strategic documents

    Convention on the Rights of

    Persons with Disability (United

    Nations 2006)

    Count Me In: Disability Future

    Directions (DSC 2009)

    Delivering Community Services in

    Partnership Policy (Department of

    Premier and Cabinet 2011)

    Disability Care and Support Reports

    (Productivity Commission 2011)

    Disability Services Commission

    Strategic Plan 2011–2015

    (DSC 2011)

    National Disability Agreement

    (Commonwealth of Australia 2011)

    National Disability Strategy

    (Commonwealth of Australia 2009)

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    3 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    This diagram below explains how the plan will be developed:

    Have your say

    We are seeking feedback from interested stakeholders and have developed a list of questions covering a number of topics for your consideration. A feedback form template has also been provided which may assist you in consolidating your comments. Should you wish to use the template provided you can either complete it electronically or print it and hand write your comments.

    Forms can be returned to the Commission by email or post.

    email the template to sector.development@dsc.wa.gov.au

    post the template to:

    Disability Services Commission Sector Development Plan Feedback PO Box 441 WEST PERTH WA 6872

    The template has been supplied as a helpful tool but it is not compulsory that you use it or answer every question to provide your feedback. Any general comments can be provided to the Commission via email or post using the details above, or they can be provided verbally or by attending a focus group.

    To provide feedback another way you can:

    provide verbal feedback by phoning Sector Development on 9426 9309

    attend a focus group that will be hosted in local areas (these will be advertised on the www.dsc.wa.gov.au web site).

    The closing date for feedback will be advertised on the www.dsc.wa.gov.au web site. If you have any questions or require further assistance, please email sector.development@dsc.wa.gov.au or phone 9426 9309.

    Phase one

    Describing existing supports and services

    15 profile area consultation documents

    State-wide overview

    Phase two

    Seeking local feedback

    Identifying strengths and gaps

    Phase three

    Planning and identifying opportunities to improve the sector

    Developing solutions to address gaps

    mailto:sector.development@dsc.wa.gov.auhttp://www.dsc.wa.gov.au/http://www.dsc.wa.gov.au/mailto:sector.development@dsc.wa.gov.au

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    4 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Note about information and data

    All efforts have been taken to ensure that the data contained in these profiles is as accurate

    and contemporary as possible. Specific data limitations are listed throughout the profiles

    and in Appendix B and users are encouraged to interpret the information with caution.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    5 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Location

    The north metropolitan area profile covers about 784 square kilometres (Australian Bureau

    of Statistics 2012b) and includes two local government authorities (LGAs): the Cities of

    Joondalup and Wanneroo. The region stretches from Warwick and Koondoola in the south

    to Two Rocks in the north and from Yanchep in the west to Gnangara in the east. Of the

    two LGAs, the City of Wanneroo covers the largest expanse of land covering about 87 per

    cent of the total area (ABS 2012b).

    Demographics

    According to the 2011 Census (ABS 2012b), there is an estimated 304,783 people living in

    the region with the population evenly split between the Cities of Joondalup and Wanneroo.

    This represents about 13.61 per cent of the West Australian population.

    Table 1: North metropolitan population by LGA area

    Total: North metropolitan profile area 304,483

    City of Joondalup 152,406

    City of Wanneroo 152,077

    Source: ABS 2012b.

    The age distribution across the population in the north metropolitan area is similar to that

    across Western Australia.

    According to the Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers (SDAC) 2009, Small area

    estimates, an estimated 3,298 (2.2%) (refer to footnote 1) of the private dwelling population

    have a severe or profound core activity limitation (ABS 2012c) (refer to

    footnote 2). In reality most areas do not deviate hugely from 3.1% because the numbers

    are so small.

    1 Figures from the SDAC are produced from samples which are then generalised to the population—the numbers are referred to as estimates and are to be used as a guide only (see Appendix B). 2 Core activities are tasks related to self-care, mobility and communication. People with severe and profound limitations sometimes or always need help and supervision with a core activity, or have difficulty understanding or being understood by family and friends (ABS 2012b) (see Appendix B).

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    6 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Population characteristics

    About 39 per cent of the population in this area was born overseas, which is

    significantly more than the WA average of 31 per cent (ABS 2012b).

    13.76 per cent of the north metropolitan population speaks a language other than

    English at home (ABS 2012b). In Joondalup, it is 9.83 per cent and in Wanneroo the

    figure is 17.7 per cent—both these figures are below the WA average of 21 per cent.

    People who identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander in the 2011 Census

    represent 1.05 per cent of the population in the north metropolitan area (ABS

    2012b). This is significantly lower than all of WA, where the figure is three per cent.

    For the LGAs in this profile area, nearly seven per cent of the population provided

    unpaid assistance to a person with disability (ABS 2012b). This is slightly lower than

    the percentage recorded for the State (ABS 2012b).

    The median total household weekly incomes across the north metropolitan area are slightly

    higher than the State figure ($1,415) (ABS 2012b). Residents in each LGA recorded the

    following median total household incomes:

    Table 2: Median total household income

    State-wide median total household income $1,415

    City of Joondalup $1,780

    City of Wanneroo $1,514

    Source: ABS 2012b.

    Table 3: Rental and housing prices

    Suburb LGA Median weekly

    rent (3 b/rm)

    Median house

    price (3 b/rm)

    Banksia Grove City of Wanneroo $370 $373,500

    Duncraig City of Joondalup $400 $620,000

    Joondalup City of Joondalup $380 $470,000

    Ocean Reef City of Joondalup $400 $700,000

    Quinns Rocks City of Wanneroo $350 $460,000

    Wanneroo City of Wanneroo $350 $395,000

    Perth metropolitan N/A $385 $470,000

    Source: Real Estate Institute of WA (REIWA) 2012 (refer to footnote 3).

    3 Rent prices from October–December 2011. House prices based on sales as at 4 May 2012.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    7 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    There are many other sources of information that could be considered with this area profile

    document. Information about health services, local government services and education

    services will enhance the context in which disability sector development is considered. For

    example, Regional Development Australia (RDA) has developed a Regional Plan for Perth

    which can be accessed via rda.gov.au/my-rda/wa.

    Tell us what you think

    1. What other information would you like to add about the north metropolitan area that

    is not already contained in the profile?

    People, families, supports and services

    This section describes supports and services people with disability, families and carers

    accessed in the north metropolitan profile area in 2011−2012. It includes information about

    networks and support groups, Commission-funded and provided services and other

    community services available.

    Networks and support groups

    People with disability, their families and carers often get practical and moral support from

    their wider family, friends, neighbours and other families of people with disability. This

    support is important.

    Informal and structured community groups also play a valuable role in supporting and

    strengthening individuals and families. People and families are often involved within their

    community in church groups, sports and recreation activities, community networks,

    mothers’ groups, playgroups, self-help and peer support programs, disability-specific

    support groups, cultural groups and education and counselling services.

    People can access information about local support groups through other community

    members, the Commission’s Local Area Coordination (LAC) or through information services

    provided by Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centres (CRCC), Carers WA or local

    government authorities (LGAs).

    A sample of groups and organisations providing support in the area includes (Support

    Groups Association WA 2012):

    Duncraig Information and Care Centre: Provides a caring, compassionate service to

    members of the community, listening carefully to their problems and providing information

    and referral.

    Address: 29 Wandoo Road, Duncraig, WA, 6023.

    http://rda.gov.au/my-rda/wa

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    8 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    ISHAR Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health: Provides services to help women deal

    with problems or worries, stay healthy, build self-confidence and meet women from other

    countries. A female GP, clinical and therapeutic services, counselling, carer support and

    skills development, multilingual information available.

    Open Monday to Friday from 9am–4pm.

    Contact: 9345 5335 Web: www.ishar.org.au

    Mercey Family Care: Provides community based activities, group meetings, courses and

    programs. Other services include information and advocacy, training seminars and other

    professional services. Open Monday to Friday between 8.30am–4.30pm.

    Contact: 9342 4181

    Parent Focus: A support group for parents whose children have Cerebral Palsy, providing

    information, education services, library resources and group meetings, as well as friendship

    and support. Please phone for meeting details.

    Contact: 0413 538 542 Web: www.cp-fg.org

    Patricia Giles Counselling Service for Women: Offers counselling and therapeutic

    groups for women in the Northern Suburbs who have experienced/are experiencing

    domestic violence.

    Postal address: PO Box 25, Joondalup, WA, 6027.

    WA Special Families: is a state wide Facebook support group. It is accessed by invite-only

    and the people able to access it must be a parent of or someone caring for, a person with

    disability.

    Women’s Healthworks (WHW): Works to empower women, enabling them to make more

    informed decisions about their health and well-being. Provides information, education,

    support and social groups, including women only walking groups, craft groups, the laughter

    club, and counseling.

    Contact: 9300 1566 Web: www.womenshealthworks.org.au

    Tell us what you think

    2. What other disability or community support groups are available and active in this area?

    3. What other informal community support groups would the area benefit from?

    http://www.ishar.org.au/http://www.cp-fg.org/http://www.womenshealthworks.org.au/

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    9 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    People using Commission-funded and provided services

    This section describes people with disability and their families who live in the north

    metropolitan area and used Commission-funded and provided supports and services in

    2011−2012. It reflects how the Commission defines, organises and funds services at

    present. It does not provide detail about how well these services are working.

    Local information and support for individuals and families

    Local Area Coordination (LAC)

    Many people with disability and their families access the Commission’s LAC support. LAC

    works at an individual and community level to support people with disability, their families and

    carers to participate, contribute and belong in their local communities. It assists people with

    disability and their families’ access supports and services designed to help them exercise

    choices in their daily lives. This approach helps to foster independence and the development of

    skills and abilities that enables them to participate in their community and to pursue a good life.

    LAC works directly with individuals and families to provide support that is personalised,

    flexible and responsive. The cornerstone of the LAC role is building and maintaining

    effective working relationships that help support individuals and families to pursue their

    goals and meet their needs. LAC provides local support to children and adults with physical,

    sensory, neurological, cognitive and/or intellectual disability who are under 65 at the time

    they first apply for support.

    In 2011–2012, 1,181 people in the north metropolitan area were registered with LAC

    according to the Annual Client and Service Data Collection (ACDC) (Disability Services

    Commission 2012). Of these people:

    More than 60 per cent were aged between five and 19 (this is consistent with the

    high numbers of young people registered with LAC across WA).

    Most lived in Joondalup (609), followed by Wanneroo (572).

    Directing supports and services—shared management

    Most people with an individualised funding allocation from the Commission have their

    support managed and provided by a prequalified disability sector organisation. Some

    people with Community Living or Family Living manage their funding allocation through an

    agreement with their LAC.

    Disability service organisations are encouraged to offer shared management which enables

    individuals and/or families to have directive control over matters related to their supports

    and funding. Some people have their funding allocation transferred to them by the

    organisation and they manage the use of these funds and acquittal in accordance with the

    shared management agreement.

    Where the individual and/or family elect to take on shared management, negotiation occurs

    between the individual and/or family and the organisation to achieve a shared agreement.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    10 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    This enables each party’s requirements, expectations and responsibilities to be clearly

    established and subsequently documented in a signed shared management agreement.

    Shared management gives those people who want autonomy an opportunity to have

    greater control. It requires a good relationship between all parties to ensure the right

    balance of support is provided.

    Table 4: Organisations that offered shared management in the north metropolitan

    area in 2012

    Activ Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Baptistcare My Place

    Cam Can & Associates Perth Home Care Services

    Community Vision Rocky Bay

    Family Support WA The Centre for Cerebral Palsy

    Interchange Vemvane

    Source: DSC 2012.

    Supported living

    Supported living describes a type of support provided to people with disability so they can

    live in their home and community. In WA, it is resourced through individual funding

    allocated by the Commission. This funding is applied for by the individual (or their family)

    and is allocated on the basis of priority of need, through the Combined Application Process,

    or allocated based on need and planning through the Community Living Program.

    Increasingly, this support is provided in ways that allow people greater choice and flexibility.

    In 2011−12, 196 people in the north metropolitan area had a Commission allocated

    individualised funding package and were supported in shared supported accommodation or

    an individualised accommodation arrangement (DSC 2012).

    Shared supported accommodation

    In 2011−12, 115 people in the north metropolitan area had an individualised funding

    package for accommodation support and lived in one of 23 shared support accommodation

    arrangements (group homes) (DSC 2012). This represented about six per cent of all group

    homes across the State. Of these 115 people, more than 38 per cent were aged between

    20 and 34. Other information of note includes:

    Most people were living in Wanneroo (96), followed by Joondalup (19).

    Four organisations provide most of the shared supported accommodation in this profile

    area—i.d.entity.wa, Autism Association, Brightwater Care Group and Disability Services

    Commission—Accommodation Services.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    11 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Individualised community living (ICL)

    In the north metropolitan area in 2011−12, 81 people had an individualised funding package

    for accommodation support and individual community living support and services (DSC

    2012). Most of these people live in Wanneroo (47).

    There are many Commission prequalified organisations providing people with individualised

    community living support in the north metropolitan area (see Appendix A).

    15 people in this area have a community living package.

    Support to pursue meaningful occupation/lifestyle

    This section describes services and supports available for people to pursue meaningful

    occupation and an active lifestyle. These services tend to be referred to as social

    participation, alternatives to employment or post-school options and recreation.

    Post School Options (PSO) and Alternatives to Employment (ATE) are Commission funded

    programs intended to support people to pursue meaningful activities during their week. Both

    programs involve the application and allocation of individualised funding packages to

    individuals. The PSO program is for individuals of school-leaving age and allocated based

    on eligibility and support needs. ATE funding can be accessed by adults with disability

    through the Combined Application Process and is based on eligibility, support needs and

    priority of need.

    In the north metropolitan area, 289 people received an ATE or PSO allocation in

    2011−2012 (DSC 2012):

    More than 78 per cent were aged between 15 and 34.

    Most people lived in Wanneroo (150), followed by Joondalup (139).

    There are many Commission prequalified organisations working with people with

    ATE and PSO funding allocations in the north metropolitan area (see Appendix A).

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    12 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Recreation

    Eligible people with disability may access support to pursue recreational activities. The

    Commission contracts and funds organisations to provide recreation support. People

    contact organisations to find out about eligibility and access to services.

    In 2011–2012, 170 people in the north metropolitan area used recreation support services

    (DSC 2012):

    Most people lived in Joondalup (101), followed by Wanneroo (69).

    Riding for the Disabled Association of WA was the recreation service used by the

    largest number of people in the north metropolitan region.

    Support to families

    This section describes services and supports for families when additional support is

    required. These supports and services aim to improve family wellbeing. In some cases,

    these supports and services are individually funded such as through the Family Living

    Initiative (FLI) or Intensive Family Support (IFS). In other cases, service organisations are

    funded directly (block-funded) to provide support to eligible people, such as with respite

    services. The FLI is a relatively new strategy to support families. It has a strong emphasis on

    planning. Families can apply for an individualised funding allocation based on a plan that

    complements informal supports provided by families, carers, friends and the wider

    community.

    When families are under stress or at risk of breakdown people with disability can apply for

    IFS funding through the Commission’s Combined Application Process (CAP). Funding is

    allocated to people who have been given the highest priority by an independent panel and

    is allocated specifically to the person with disability.

    In the north metropolitan area in 2011–2012:

    168 people and their families received Intensive Family Support funding (DSC 2012).

    Of these people, almost 58 per cent were aged between 10 and 24.

    Most lived in Joondalup (94), followed by Wanneroo (74).

    37 people have a plan and funding package through the Commission’s Family Living

    Initiative (DSC 2012).

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    13 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Breaks for families and carers

    To give themselves a break, families and carers can sometimes access services from

    Commission-funded disability sector organisations (often called respite or family support

    services). The Commonwealth also funds respite services.

    Respite programs are generally block-funded (direct contract and funding to organisations)

    with individuals and families applying for respite opportunities that are allocated based on

    need and vacancies.

    These services can be provided in the person’s home and/or community (also known as

    flexible or non-residential respite) or in respite houses (also known as out-of-home or

    residential respite). Many organisations offer places in school holiday programs.

    Access to family support services by a person and their family will vary depending on their

    relative need, type of respite accessed and availability of services. It is important to note

    Commonwealth Respite and Care Link can provide families with information about

    organisations that provide respite in their area. It can also fund short-term or one-off

    respite through Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing funding.

    Local Area Coordinators can also help families have a break or access supports. 83 people

    received some form of family support package funded through the Commission and

    managed through LAC.

    In 2011–2012, 427 people in the north metropolitan profile area accessed Commission-

    funded respite support through prequalified organisations (DSC 2012).

    The state government recently opened a respite house in Clarkson—this service is

    contracted to Life Without Barriers

    Support to optimise independence and wellbeing

    Disability professional services

    Many people with disability access professional services, including therapy, to contribute to

    their wellbeing, independence and positive relationships and to develop skills to participate

    in community life.

    The Commission funds organisations to provide comprehensive and targeted professional

    services to eligible people with disability. People may also pay privately for these types of

    services, use services through WA Health or, in some cases, access Commonwealth

    funding. In regional Western Australia, these services are provided through WA Health’s

    Country Health Services. The Commission provides a range of disability professional

    services through its State-wide Specialist Services directorate.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    14 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Through comprehensive services, eligible individuals can access therapies (including

    speech and occupational therapy), physiotherapy and psychology support. Comprehensive

    services respond flexibly to the needs and desired outcomes of individuals and their

    families. Services are organised by early childhood, school-age and adult intervention

    services. People can access disability professional services through several means,

    depending on eligibility, availability of services and relative need.

    In 2011−2012, the following numbers of people accessed comprehensive disability

    professional services in the north metropolitan area: early childhood (296), school age (694)

    and adult intervention services (137) (DSC 2012).

    Targeted services are single-focused, highly specified services available State-wide and

    across a person’s lifespan. Services include equipment display, specialised equipment

    consultancy, interventions for challenging behaviours and State-wide consultancy and

    resource teams. These teams work with service providers to better support people with

    highly complex needs.

    In the north metropolitan areas in 2011–2012, 1,254 people with disability accessed some

    form of comprehensive or targeted disability professional services (DSC 2012).

    Tell us what you think

    4. What difference are supports and services making?

    5. How well are disability-specific supports and services complementing other

    community supports?

    6. Can you provide details of any partnerships that are working well in this area?

    7. Does the mix of services match the needs of people in this area?

    8. What supports are working well in this area?

    9. Are there services and supports in this area that are not achieving the best

    outcomes? What kind of fine-tuning is needed?

    10. Are there barriers to accessing services and supports in this area? If so, what are

    they?

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    15 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Other community services

    Employment supports and services for people with disability

    Some people with disability access employment services to support them to find and keep a

    job. People choose (or are assessed and directed by Centrelink) to access Australian

    Disability Enterprises (ADE) or Disability Employment Services (DES), depending on their

    support requirements. Individuals may be required to undergo formal assessments such as

    a job capacity assessment (by Centrelink) to determine their eligibility for support.

    Australian Disability Enterprises (ADE)

    ADEs (formerly Business Services) provide employment opportunities for people with

    disability. These are commercial enterprises funded by the Department of Families, Housing,

    Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) (Australian Government, FaHCSIA

    2011). There is one ADE operating in the north metropolitan area—Intework Joondalup.

    Disability Employment Services (DES)

    Disability Employment Services help people with disability find and keep a job in the open

    labour market. DES are funded by the Department of Education, Employment and

    Workplace Relations (DEEWR) (Australian Government, DEEWR 2012).

    People can access one of two DES programs, depending on their assistance needs:

    Disability Management Services (DMS) and Employment Support Services (ESS). DMS

    programs provide support to job-seekers with disability, injury or health conditions who do

    not require long-term assistance in the workplace. ESS programs provide longer term

    support in the workplace to people with disability (Australian Government, DEEWR 2012).

    Detailed information about DES available to people in the north metropolitan profile area

    can be found at www.deewr.gov.au/Employment/Programs/DES/Pages/About.aspx.

    Tell us what you think

    11. What is required to support people with disability in the area to achieve their

    employment aspirations?

    12. What are the main three factors that assist people with disability to achieve their

    employment aspirations? (list in order of importance—with one being most important).

    13. What are the top three barriers to people with disability achieving their employment

    aspirations? (list in order—with one being the greatest barrier).

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    16 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Home and Community Care Services (HACC)

    The HACC program provides basic assistance to people who are aged, frail or with

    disability, supporting them to continue living independently (Australian Government 2010).

    Services include nursing care, allied health care, meals, domestic assistance, personal

    care, home maintenance, transport, respite, counselling, information and advocacy, social

    supports and assistance with essential activities such as shopping and banking.

    In the metropolitan area, individuals may apply for HACC services and be assessed for

    eligibility via the Commonwealth Carelink and Respite Centre (CCRC). The HACC program

    has limited resources and services are allocated according to relative needs (Australian

    Government 2010). HACC is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and

    Ageing and WA Health. The WA Government is responsible for managing and approving

    HACC services. Detailed information about the number and types services provided in the

    north metropolitan profile area can be found at

    www.health.wa.gov.au/hacc/docs/mds/HACC_Report_2010_2011.pdf

    Tell us what you think

    14. What examples can you provide of Home and Community Care services working

    well on the ground for people with disability in this area?

    Demand for supports and services

    The demand for supports and services (current and future) can be challenging to accurately

    quantify. Demand from people wanting support and services continues to grow, as does new

    and responsive ways of meeting demand. This includes the use of social media to provide

    information and support, flexible delivery of services in the home, school or community and

    locally-based solutions such as those proposed through the My Way project. While demand

    grows, many people need less support over time as they gain confidence.

    Over many years, demand has been quantified in relation to service programs such as the

    need for more accommodation or respite services or by considering waiting lists. The

    evolution of services to focus on individualised responses provides an opportunity to focus

    on new ways of providing more tailored support and services. The focus on more

    individualised self-directed supports aims to achieve increased quality and better use of

    limited resources. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in demand for

    services that allow a tailored, flexible approach. Increasingly, service organisations are

    shifting their focus to offer new ways of providing support and services, such as sharing

    management. It is expected demand for more tailored services will continue to increase.

    http://www.health.wa.gov.au/hacc/docs/mds/HACC_Report_2010_2011.pdf

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    17 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Service access

    The number of people accessing services in the north metropolitan area is relatively similar

    to other areas across WA in most service types, considering per 1,000 head of population.

    In contrast to other programs, there is a lower rate of people in shared supported

    accommodation or group homes (0.38) compared to WA (0.88) and a lower rate of people

    accessing individualised community living (0.27) compared to WA (0.51).

    Table 5: Service coverage for north metropolitan and state-wide per 1,000 head of

    population

    People

    accessing

    LAC

    People

    accessing

    shared

    supported

    accommod.

    People

    accessing

    individ.

    community

    living

    People

    accessing

    ATE/PSO

    People

    accessing

    intensive

    family

    support

    North

    metropolitan 3.88 0.38 0.27 0.95 0.55

    State-wide 3.89 0.88 0.51 1.12 0.42

    Source: DSC 2012.

    Future demand

    The data in the north metropolitan area highlights at least two areas of potential future

    demand:

    There are 484 young people registered with LAC in the north metropolitan area

    between the ages of 10 and 19. This may impact on future demand for supports and

    services that effectively allow young people to achieve their employment aspirations.

    This may also include support to pursue a meaningful lifestyle following school.

    Many young people with disability across Australia are not achieving adequate

    further education or employment opportunities (Organisation for Economic Co-

    operation and Development 2009). Local collaboration and targeted efforts may be

    required to improve this situation.

    There generally less people in the north metropolitan area accessing an

    accommodation support service. This may relate translate to future demand for

    support.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    18 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Tell us what you think

    15. Are you aware of any emerging trends where the changing needs of people with

    disability in this area are not fulfilled by current services? If so, what are they?

    16. What supports and services are likely to be in demand in this area into the future?

    17. What types of supports and services needed by local people are not available now?

    Sector development issues

    This section considers any existing sector development initiatives and describes what may

    be emerging needs for this profile area. Consultations will provide an opportunity to

    consider sector development in more detail.

    Sector development initiatives

    A shared management resource has been developed by West Australia’s Individualised

    Services (WAIS) and is available online at www.waindividualisedservices.org.au.

    This resource will be regularly updated and WAIS have a shared management advisor

    available to support organisations to develop and improve practice in shared management.

    Potential areas for sector development

    When considering the potential areas for sector development it may be useful to take the

    Count Me In: Disability Future Directions into account. Count Me In was developed after

    many consultations with people with disability, their families and carers, through these

    consultations 13 areas for development were identified. These include ways to support

    people with disability to participate and contribute in all areas of life, ensuring people have

    economic security, live in accessible communities, and have access to personalised

    supports and services (DSC 2009, 7).

    An initial review of data included in this profile area suggests the following potential areas

    for sector development initiatives:

    Adequate support to individuals and families who prefer to undertake shared

    management—demand for individuals and families to share manage services is

    increasing. In the east metropolitan area, some organisations offer shared

    management but many do not. Demand for shared management is likely to increase

    into the future. Organisations and individuals may require practical assistance to

    undertake shared management and ensure they are supported adequately.

    Optimising employment opportunities—sector development may be required to

    ensure adequate career/employment preparation and planning and support

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    19 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    opportunities are developed to help the high numbers of young people registered

    with LAC in this area pursue meaningful lifestyles.

    Tell us what you think

    18. Can you suggest any ways to improve the effectiveness of disability supports and

    services in WA? If so what are they?

    19. Can you identify barriers to improving the effectiveness of disability supports and

    services in WA?

    20. If so, what are the top three barriers? (list in order—with one being the greatest

    barrier).

    21. Can you suggest any opportunities for developing the disability sector in WA? If so,

    what would they be? (list in order—with one being the biggest opportunity).

    22. Are there any emerging issues regarding the disability services sector or emerging

    issues facing people with disability, their families and carers? What do we need to

    take into consideration when planning in this area?

    23. To what extent do service providers have the capacity to support people with

    disability, families and carers to share decision-making and management of their

    supports and services where and when needed?

    General comments

    24. Do you have any other feedback?

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    20 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    References

    Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2012a, Table Builder Basic 2006, Map Builder,

    CData Online, accessed 13 August 2012, www.abs.gov.au/CDataOnline .

    Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2012b, Census of Population and Housing,

    Basic Community Profiles, accessed 25 July 2012,

    www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/censushome.nsf/home/communityprofiles?opendocument&na

    vpos=230 .

    Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2012c, Survey of Disability Ageing and Carers

    (SDAC) 2009, Small Area Estimates.

    Australian Government, Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and

    Indigenous Affairs 2011, Australian Disability Enterprises, accessed 21 June 2012,

    www.australiandisabilityenterprises.com.au/About.aspx .

    Australian Government, Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

    2012, Disability Employment Services, accessed 21 June 2012,

    www.deewr.gov.au/Employment/Programs/DES/Pages/About.aspx .

    Australian Government, Department of Health and Ageing, Home-based care 2010, accessed

    21 June 2012, www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/hacc-index.htm .

    Australian Government, Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and

    Sport (RDA) 2012, Perth Regional Plan, accessed 27 November 2012,

    docs.google.com/file/d/0B6NOy3OyRrd7NmpiNGkxQ3dQNWs/edit?pli=1 .

    Disability Services Commission (DSC) 2009, Count Me In: Disability Future Directions. Disability Services Commission: Perth, WA, accessed 10 December 2012, www.disability.wa.gov.au . Disability Services Commission (DSC) 2011, Annual Client and Service Data Collection (ACDC) Data Guide: Questions and Definitions. For Western Australian Service Providers 2011–2012, accessed 28 November 2012, www.disability.wa.gov.au .

    Disability Services Commission (DSC) 2012, Annual Client Data Collection (ACDC)

    2011–2012, Service User Data.

    Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 2009, Sickness,

    Disability and Work: keeping on track in the economic downturn–background paper.

    www.oecd.org/employment/employmentpoliciesanddata/42699911.pdf .

    http://www.deewr.gov.au/Employment/Programs/DES/Pages/About.aspxhttp://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/hacc-index.htmhttps://docs.google.com/file/d/0B6NOy3OyRrd7NmpiNGkxQ3dQNWs/edit?pli=1http://www.disability.wa.gov.au/http://www.disability.wa.gov.au/http://www.oecd.org/employment/employmentpoliciesanddata/42699911.pdf

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    21 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Real Estate Institute of Western Australia 2012, Perth Suburb Profiles, Rental price for period

    October–December 2011 and house prices for period April 2011–April 2012, accessed 1

    August 2012, reiwa.com.au/Research/Pages/Suburb-profile-

    results.aspx?suburb_id=121&census_code=SSC51036&geogroup_id=2627&geogroup_pare

    nt_id=3 .

    Support Groups Association Western Australia 2012, Connect Groups, Directory Search,

    accessed 20 August 2012,

    www.connectgroups.org.au/modules/directory/search.php?search_term=&location=6126&s

    earch=Submit+Search .

    Western Australia’s Individualised Services (WAIS) 2012, Shared Management. A guide for

    Support Organisations exploring Shared Management, accessed 25 November 2012,

    www.waindividualisedservices.org.au/assets/Uploads/SharedmanagementGuide-

    FINAL2.pdf .

    http://www.connectgroups.org.au/modules/directory/search.php?search_term=&location=6126&search=Submit+Searchhttp://www.connectgroups.org.au/modules/directory/search.php?search_term=&location=6126&search=Submit+Searchhttp://www.waindividualisedservices.org.au/assets/Uploads/SharedmanagementGuide-FINAL2.pdfhttp://www.waindividualisedservices.org.au/assets/Uploads/SharedmanagementGuide-FINAL2.pdf

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    22 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Appendix A—Additional data

    Table 6: Percentage of total state-wide population residing in the north metropolitan

    profile area

    North metropolitan total population

    State-wide total population Percentage of state-wide total population

    304,483 2,239,170 13.60%

    Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2012b.

    Chart 1: Population age distribution north metropolitan compared to state-wide

    Source: ABS 2012b.

    0.00

    2.00

    4.00

    6.00

    8.00

    10.00

    12.00

    14.00

    Percentage of people

    Age ranges

    North metropolitan population distribution(%)

    State-wide population distribution (%)

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    23 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 7: General population and population with severe or profound core activity

    limitation under 65 years-of-age in north metropolitan and state-wide

    Area Estimated

    residential

    population

    Estimated

    population with

    severe or

    profound activity

    limitation

    Estimated

    percentage of

    population with

    disability

    North metropolitan

    profile area

    148,952 3,298 2.2%

    State-wide 1,932,500 60,300 3.1%

    Source: ABS 2012c.

    Chart 2: Numbers of people registered with Commission’s Local Area Coordination

    (LAC) in the north metropolitan area by age range in 2011–2012

    Age ranges 0-4 5-9 10-

    14

    15-

    19

    20-

    24

    25-

    29

    30-

    34

    35-

    39

    40-

    44

    45-

    49

    50-

    54

    55-

    59

    60-

    64

    65+

    North

    metropolitan

    totals

    92 229 252 232 135 67 46 34 23 31 15 16 5 5

    Source: Disability Services Commission (DSC) 2012 (refer to Appendix B).

    0

    50

    100

    150

    200

    250

    300

    Number of people

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    24 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Chart 3: Number of people accessing shared supported accommodation and

    individualised community living in the north metropolitan area in 2011–2012

    Age ranges 15-

    19

    20-

    24

    25-

    29

    30-

    34

    35-

    39

    40-

    44

    45-

    49

    50-

    54

    55-

    59

    60-

    64

    65+

    Shared

    supported 5 13 18 13 6 17 10 13 9 6 5

    Individualised

    community

    living

    11 16 8 11 9 5 5 6 7 5 0

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B).

    0

    5

    10

    15

    20

    25

    30

    35

    40

    45

    50

    55

    60

    65

    Number of people

    Community Residential Individualised Community Living

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    25 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 8: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for shared

    supported accommodation in 2011–2012

    Organisation Number of people

    rounded to nearest 5

    i.d.entity.wa 30

    Autism Association of WA 25

    Brightwater Care Group (Inc) 25

    DSC - Accommodation Services 25

    Life Without Barriers 5

    Teem Treasure 5

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy 5

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B).

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    26 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 9: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for

    individualised community living in 2011–2012

    Organisation Number of people

    rounded to nearest 5

    My Place 15

    LAC (self-managing) 10

    Life Without Barriers 10

    Perth Home Care Services 10

    Activ Foundation Inc 5

    Autism Association of WA 5

    Baptistcare 5

    BGSR Pty Ltd Supported Accommodation Service 5

    Cam Can & Associates 5

    Community Vision Inc 5

    Elba Inc 5

    Family Support WA 5

    Key Assets WA Ltd 5

    Lifestyle Solutions (Aust) Ltd 5

    Multiple Sclerosis Society 5

    Nascha Inc 5

    Outcare Inc 5

    People Actively Committed Together 5

    Teem Treasure 5

    UnitingCare West 5

    Vemvane 5

    WA Deaf Society 5

    We Can Community Services Pty Ltd 5

    Westcare Inc 5

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B).

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    27 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Chart 4: Numbers of people accessing Alternatives to Employment (ATE) and/or Post

    School Options (PSO) in the north metropolitan area by age group in 2011–2012

    Age ranges 15-

    19

    20-

    24

    25-

    29

    30-

    34

    35-

    39

    40-

    44

    45-

    49

    50-

    54

    55-

    59

    60-

    64

    65+

    North

    metropolitan

    totals

    41 98 52 36 16 16 10 7 7 5 5

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B).

    0

    10

    20

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70

    80

    90

    100

    110

    120

    130

    Number of people

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    28 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 10: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for ATE/PSO

    in 2011–2012

    Organisation Number of people

    rounded to nearest 5

    Intework 75

    Valued Independent People 45

    Kira 30

    Autism Association of WA 20

    Community Vision Inc 20

    My Place 20

    Activ Foundation Inc 15

    Perth Home Care Services 15

    Baptistcare 10

    Family Support WA 10

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy 10

    Crosslinks 5

    Disability in the Arts Disadvantage in the Arts (WA) Incorporated 5

    Elba Inc 5

    Interchange Inc 5

    LAC (self-managing) 5

    Life Without Barriers 5

    Lifeplan Recreation & Leisure Association Inc 5

    Multiple Sclerosis Society 5

    Nulsen Haven Association Inc 5

    Rise (formerly Hills Community Support group (Inc)) 5

    Rocky Bay Inc 5

    Senses Foundation (Inc) 5

    Transition & Integration Services 5

    Workpower Incorporated 5

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B and footnote 4).

    4 These services may not actually be based in this area and some people may travel out of the area to a preferred service.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    29 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 11: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for recreation

    in 2011–2012

    Organisation Number of people

    rounded to nearest 5

    Riding for the Disabled Association of WA 80

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy 30

    WA Disabled Sports Association 30

    Activ Foundation Inc 20

    i.d.entity.wa 10

    Inclusion WA 10

    Multiple Sclerosis Society 5

    Paraplegic Quadriplegic Association 5

    Rocky Bay Inc 5

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B and footnote 5).

    5 Recreation services are provided by organisations contracted directly by the Commission.

    People may travel out of their local area to receive this support. Access to services is

    directly through the organisations.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    30 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Chart 5: Numbers of people accessing Intensive Family Support (IFS) services in the

    north metropolitan area by age group in 2011–2012.

    Age ranges 0-4 5-9 10-

    14

    15-

    19

    20-

    24

    25-

    29

    30-

    34

    35-

    39

    40-

    44

    45-

    49

    50-

    54

    55-

    59

    60-

    64

    65+

    North

    metropolitan

    totals

    5 13 32 34 31 19 9 5 5 10 5 5 0 5

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B).

    0

    5

    10

    15

    20

    25

    30

    35

    40

    45

    50

    55

    60

    65

    Number of people

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    31 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 12: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for IFS

    services in 2011–2012

    Organisation Number of people

    rounded to nearest 5

    LAC (self-managing) 30

    Australian Red Cross (Lady Lawley Cottage) 20

    Autism Association of WA 20

    Perth Home Care Services 20

    Baptistcare 10

    Community Vision Inc 10

    Family Support WA 10

    Life Without Barriers 10

    My Place 10

    People Actively Committed Together 10

    Valued Independent People 10

    Activ Foundation Inc 5

    Directions Family Support Association 5

    Elba Inc 5

    Enable South West 5

    i.d.entity.wa 5

    Intework 5

    Key Assets WA Ltd 5

    Lifestyle Solutions (Aust) Ltd 5

    Multiple Sclerosis Society 5

    Nascha Inc 5

    Pilbara and Kimberley Care Inc 5

    Senses Foundation (Inc) 5

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy 5

    UnitingCare West 5

    Vemvane 5

    Wheatbelt Individual and Family Support Association 5

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to Appendix B).

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    32 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 13: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for out-of-

    home (centre-based) respite in 2011–2012

    Organisation

    Activ Foundation Inc

    Australian Red Cross (Lady Lawley Cottage)

    Autism Association of WA

    Fairbridge Western Australia Inc.

    Family Support WA

    i.d.entity.wa

    Life Without Barriers

    Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Pilbara and Kimberley Care Inc

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to footnote 6).

    6 The respite accessed by a person and their family will vary depending on their relative

    need, type of respite accessed and availability of services. It is important to note

    Commonwealth Respite and Care Link can provide families with information about

    organisations that provide respite in their area and can also fund short-term or one-off

    respite through Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing funding. This table only

    reflects Commission-funded centre-based services.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    33 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 14: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for flexible

    respite in 2011–2012

    Organisation

    Activ Foundation Inc

    Association for the Blind of Western Australia (Inc)

    Australian Red Cross (Lady Lawley Cottage)

    Baptistcare

    Community Vision Inc

    Directions Family Support Association

    Disability in the Arts Disadvantage in the Arts (WA) Incorporated

    Enable South West

    Inclusion WA

    Intework

    Kids' Camps Inc

    Lifestyle Solutions (Aust) Ltd

    Midway Community Care

    Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Nascha Inc

    People Actively Committed Together

    Perth Home Care Services

    Pilbara and Kimberley Care Inc

    Rocky Bay Inc

    Spiers Centre Inc

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy

    UnitingCare Crossroads

    Valued Independent People

    Vemvane

    Wheatbelt Individual and Family Support Association

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to footnote 7).

    7 It is important to note Commonwealth Respite and Care Link can provide families with

    information about organisations that provide respite in their area and can also fund short-

    term or one-off respite through Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing funding.

    This table only reflects Commission-funded flexible services.

    Some people manage their family support funding (flexible respite) allocation, directly

    through LAC.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    34 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 15: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for

    Commission-funded disability professional services (DPS) in 2011–2012

    Organisation Comprehensive DPS Targeted DPS

    ECI SAI AI BSI Other

    Association for the Blind of Western Australia (Inc)

    Autism Association of WA

    DSC - Statewide Specialist Services

    Family Planning WA

    Independent Living Centre

    Intervention Services for Autism and Developmental Delay (ISADD) WA Pty Ltd

    Kids are Kids! Therapy and Education Centre Inc.

    Kids Biz Therapy Centre

    Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Nulsen Haven Association Inc

    Rocky Bay Inc

    Senses Foundation (Inc)

    Telethon Speech and Hearing Centre for Children WA (Inc)

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy

    Therapy Focus Inc

    WA Deaf Society

    Wize Therapy Pty Ltd

    Source: DSC 2012.

    Key:

    ECI Early childhood intervention BSI Behaviour specialist intervention

    SAI School-aged intervention Other Equipment and other targeted services, relationships

    AI Adult intervention

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    35 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Chart 6: Numbers of people accessing comprehensive DPS by program and age

    group, per 1,000 head of population, comparing the north metropolitan area to Perth

    metropolitan in 2011–2012

    Early Childhood School Age Adult Intervention

    North metropolitan 0.97 2.28 0.45

    Perth metropolitan 0.86 1.74 0.79

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to footnote 8).

    8 This chart compares the number of people with disability accessing Commission-funded comprehensive DPS in the north metropolitan area to state-wide by comparing numbers of people per 1,000 head of population.

    0

    0.5

    1

    1.5

    2

    2.5

    Number of people per 1,000 head of population

    North metropolitan Perth metropolitan

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    36 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 16: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for

    Commission-funded comprehensive early childhood intervention in 2011–2012

    Organisation

    Association for the Blind of Western Australia (Inc)

    Autism Association of WA

    DSC - Statewide Specialist Services

    ISADD WA Pty Ltd

    Kids are Kids! Therapy and Education Centre Inc.

    Kids Biz Therapy Centre

    Rocky Bay Inc

    Senses Foundation (Inc)

    Telethon Speech and Hearing Centre for Children WA (Inc)

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy

    Therapy Focus Inc

    Wize Therapy Pty Ltd

    Source: DSC 2012.

    Table 17: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for

    Commission-funded comprehensive school age intervention in 2011–2012

    Organisation

    Association for the Blind of Western Australia (Inc)

    Autism Association of WA

    Rocky Bay Inc

    Senses Foundation (Inc)

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy

    Therapy Focus Inc

    Source: DSC 2012.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    37 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Table 18: Organisations used by people in the north metropolitan area for

    Commission-funded comprehensive adult intervention in 2011–2012

    Organisation

    Association for the Blind of Western Australia (Inc)

    Autism Association of WA

    DSC - Statewide Specialist Services

    Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Nulsen Haven Association Inc

    Rocky Bay Inc

    Senses Foundation (Inc)

    The Centre for Cerebral Palsy

    Source: DSC 2012.

    Table 19: Organisations providing Australian Disability Enterprise (ADE) services in or

    near the north metropolitan area

    Organisation

    Intework Joondalup

    Source: Australian Government, Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and

    Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) 2012.

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    38 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Chart 7: Numbers of people accessing services per 1,000 head of population,

    comparing the north metropolitan area to state-wide in 2011–2012.

    Registered with LAC

    Shared supported accommod.

    Individualised community living

    ATE/PSO IFS

    North

    metropolitan 3.88 0.38 0.27 0.95 0.55

    State-wide 3.89 0.88 0.51 1.12 0.42

    Source: DSC 2012 (refer to footnote 9).

    9 This chart compares the number of people with disability using various service types in the north metropolitan area to state-wide by using numbers of people per 1,000 head of population. LAC refers to numbers of people registered for the LAC service. Shared Supported Accommodation refers to people in group home accommodation. Other programs represent people allocated individualised funding packages receiving a service.

    0

    0.5

    1

    1.5

    2

    2.5

    3

    3.5

    4

    4.5

    Number of people per 1,000 head of population

    North metropolitan State-wide

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    39 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Appendix B—Data quality All efforts have been taken to ensure that the data contained in these profiles is as accurate

    and contemporary as possible. Specific data limitations are listed throughout the profiles

    and in this appendix and users are encouraged to interpret the information with caution.

    Survey of Disability Ageing and Carers (SDAC) 2009, Small Area

    Estimates (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012c)

    The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) conducted the Survey of Disability, Ageing and

    Carers (SDAC) and have released data for local government areas. These have been

    amalgamated into regions or profile areas for the Sector Development Plan which are

    based on the Commission’s Local Area Coordination (LAC) areas.

    Important notes about data quality:

    Figures from the SDAC are produced from samples which are then generalised to the

    population—the numbers are referred to as estimates and are to be used as a guide.

    The small area estimates are applicable to private dwellings, with data from special

    dwellings excluded from the analysis. Some groups have been excluded from SDAC 2009

    and have not been reflected in the small area estimates.

    Exclusions:

    The following groups are excluded from SDAC 2009 and are therefore not reflected in the

    small area estimates:

    remote and very remote settled areas

    members of the permanent Australian defence forces

    non-Australian diplomatic personnel

    members of non-Australian defence force personnel (and their dependants)

    stationed in Australia.

    The small area estimates are applicable to private dwellings in scope of ABS household

    collections. Data for the following special dwellings has therefore been excluded from the

    analysis:

    hostels for the homeless and people with disabilities

    night shelters

    refuge

    hotels and motels

    hospitals and homes, including nursing homes and retirement villages which have a

    care facility onsite

    religious and educational institution

    institutions, including psychiatric institutions and corrective institutions

  • Profile—North Metropolitan area

    40 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    cared accommodation including residents of hospitals, nursing homes, aged care

    and disability hostels and other homes such as children’s homes, who had been or

    were expected to be living there for at least three months

    prisons

    boarding houses

    indigenous communities

    caravan parks and camping grounds.

    Annual Client and Service Data Collection (ACDC) 2011–2012, Service

    user data (Disability Services Commission 2012)

    The ACDC is the Disability Services Commission’s (the Commission’s) system of collecting

    and analysing important information concerning people with disabilities and the services

    they use. This information is collected on an annual basis by each service provider and is

    reported to the Commission.

    Organisations are requested to provide information about:

    each of the service types they are funded to provide

    all service users who received appropriate support over the financial year

    the service type(s) the service user received.

    For more detailed definitions about ACDC collection refer to Annual Client and Service Data

    Collection (ACDC) Data Guide: Questions and Definitions (disability.wa.gov.au) .

    Reporting exclusions:

    Some service type outlets—particularly those providing advocacy or information/referral

    services are not requested to provide any service user details.

    Unique count:

    Service use data

    People recorded in ACDC as using services in this area have been reported as a unique

    count, with multiple recordings of people against service types removed.

    If a person lives in two profile regions during the same year they may be counted in both

    locations.

    Provider data

    Some people are reported as using services from multiple service providers within a service

    type. In this instance multiple records have not been removed as this occurrence could

    reflect personal choices in changing their provider (i.e., portability of funding).

    http://disability.wa.gov.au/

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    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Rounding of numbers:

    In this document all recordings of service use with less than five people have been rounded

    to five to prevent identification.

    Service type definitions:

    The Commission-funded services reported in this document relate to specific ACDC service

    type classifications recorded in the ACDC. The following table outlines the various ACDC

    categories that fall under the service types detailed in this document:

    Table 20: Commission-funded service types and the related ACDC reporting

    categories

    Service type ACDC reporting categories

    Alternatives to Employment and Post

    School Options

    Alternatives to Employment (ATE)

    Post School Options (PSO)

    Disability Professional Services Behaviour specialist intervention

    Comprehensive adult intervention

    Comprehensive early childhood

    intervention

    Comprehensive school aged intervention

    Regional and support teams

    Family support and respite Centre-based respite

    Family Living Initiative (FLI)

    Flexible/combination respite

    Host family respite

    Other respite

    Own home respite

    Peer support respite

    Respite brokerage

    Respite for carers

    Individualised community living Alternative family

    Attendant and personal care

    Community Living Initiative (CLI)

    In-home accommodation support

    Intensive Family Support Intensive Family Support (IFS)

    Recreation Holiday programs

    Recreation

    Shared supported accommodation Group homes or duplex

    Hostels

    Large and small residential institutions

    Shared care arrangements

    Source: DSC 2011.

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    Area profile for comment January 2013

    Tell us what you think Below is a list of questions that appear in this document. We welcome your feedback and

    response.

    Demographics and community

    1. What other information would you like to add about the north metropolitan area that

    is not already contained in the profile?

    2. What other disability or community support groups are available and active in this area?

    3. What other informal community support groups would the area benefit from?

    Disability supports and services

    4. What difference are supports and services making?

    5. How well are disability-specific supports and services complementing other

    community supports?

    6. Can you provide details of any partnerships that are working well in this area?

    7. Does the mix of services match the needs of people in this area?

    8. What supports are working well in this area?

    9. Are there services and supports in this area that are not achieving the best

    outcomes? What kind of fine-tuning is needed?

    10. Are there barriers to accessing services and supports in this area? If so, what are

    they?

    Other community services

    11. What is required to support people with disability in the area to achieve their

    employment aspirations?

    12. What are the main three factors that assist people with disability to achieve their

    employment aspirations? (list in order of importance—with one being most important).

    13. What are the top three barriers to people with disability achieving their employment

    aspirations? (list in order—with one being the greatest barrier).

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    43 │Area profile for comment January 2013 (last updated 10/12/2012)

    Area profile for comment January 2013

    14. What examples can you provide of Home and Community Care services working

    well on the ground for people with disability in this area?

    Service demand and coverage

    15. Are you aware of any emerging trends where the changing needs of people with

    disability in this area are not fulfilled by current services? If so, what are they?

    16. What supports and services are likely to be in demand in this area into the future?

    17. What types of supports and services needed by local people are not available now?

    Service planning

    18. Can you suggest any ways to improve the effectiveness of disability supports and

    services in WA? If so what are they?

    19. Can you identify barriers to improving the effectiveness of disability supports and

    services in WA?

    20. If so, what are the top three barriers? (list in order—with one being the greatest

    barrier).

    21. Can you suggest any opportunities for developing the disability sector in WA? If so,

    what would they be? (list in order—with one being the biggest opportunity).

    22. Are there any emerging issues regarding the disability services sector or emerging

    issues facing people with disability, their families and carers? What do we need to

    take into consideration when planning in this area?

    23. To what extent do service providers have the capacity to support people with

    disability, families and carers to share decision-making and management of their

    supports and services where and when needed?

    General comments

    24. Do you have any other feedback?