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Music Discipline/Performing Arts Department November 29, 2006 Music Discipline Review 2006 1
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Music Discipline Review

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Music Discipline Review

Music Discipline/Performing Arts Department

November 29, 2006

Music Discipline Review

2006

Music Discipline Review

2006Topic 1- Where are we now?

A. Purpose and Goals

The Music Discipline at Riverside Community College offers an accessible, comprehensive program, committed to providing an affordable post-secondary music education to a diverse student body. The District offers transfer programs paralleling the first two years of university offerings in music and a program leading to an Associate in the Arts degree with an emphasis in music. In the tradition of general education, the music program courses prepare students for intellectual and cultural awareness, critical and independent thought, and self-reliance. RCC has a distinguished national reputation for excellence in music performance and instruction. Students participating in music at RCC are expected to excel. Music performed by RCC students is heard at convocation, graduation and most other important occasions. Festivals, competitions, and concerts bring artists, students, and the community to the campus in the thousands. The Marching Band is a national fixture, seen regularly on television at the most prestigious of parades and often in motion pictures. The Jazz, Vocal Jazz and Wind Ensembles have compact disc recordings distributed on a commercial label with international distribution. The Jazz Ensemble and Vocal Jazz Ensembles latest releases have appeared on the Grammy Awards ballot.

Since 1984, with the addition of a marching band and pep band to go with its other performing ensembles, the RCC Music Department has offered a comprehensive music program which provides pre-professional training for the serious music student as well as for the recreational player. The program offers a complete training program that meets the requirements for transfer into music major programs at any Cal-State University or University of California, private colleges or performing arts colleges. RCC music students are well prepared to transfer into a four-year school for a Bachelor of Arts

in music. Serving the general student population who wish to learn about the art of music for arts transfer credit is an important aspect of the music department as well. Each performance by one of the numerous ensembles supports and critically enhances the

curricular offerings of the music program and is essential to a well-rounded Performing Arts Department.

Each semester students participate in ensembles and receive instruction on their instrument so they can successfully transfer with junior level status to a university or school of music. Many more enjoy the results of their peers labors at concerts and ceremonies. Even more students enroll in music appreciation classes, class piano, music fundamentals and more as a part of their humanities requirements.

The goal at RCC is to provide outstanding experiences and instruction for students that:

Wish to pursue careers in music performance or education

Need instruction in the humanities or music technology

Wish to continue making music as a part of their life long pursuit of art and education.

The purpose at RCC is to provide these experiences and instruction in a fashion that is consistently outstanding and upholds its unique tradition of success.

B. History

Known locally and regionally in the 1960s and 1970s for its quality wind ensemble and choral program, the RCC Music Department began to expand in the early 1980s. With the addition of new program offerings and new staff members, the department grew and the reputation grew with it. Now known nationally as the leader among community colleges, the music department has continued to add music faculty and programs.

C. Curriculum and Programsa.Curriculum

In the 2005-06 school year the Music Discipline updated all of the music courses found in the 2004-05 catalog. Some revisions included Music Theory 1, 2 and 3 being renamed as such and updating their content with statewide standards for matriculation. New additions included Piano Ensemble, Intermediate Applied Piano and Beginning Applied Music. All of the course outlines were updates to the latest template.

The curriculum at RCC is designed to meet a number of student needs emphasized in these areas:

1. Music major/minor transfer requirements

2. Humanities requirements for degree or transfer programs

3. Training and experience in music technology

4. Musical needs for continuing students and members of the community

For music major/minor transfer students RCC offers a comprehensive music curriculum designed to serve student needs to successfully transfer with junior level status to a university or school of music. Courses are in place to focus on these lower division areas for music majors: Music Theory, Applied Studies, Piano Skills and Outstanding Performing Ensemble Experiences. These areas are expanded upon below.

Music Theory, including: Basic Musicianship, Fundamentals of Music, Music Theory 1, Music Theory 2, Music Theory 3, Jazz Improvisation and Theory.

Applied studies on the students specific instrument (such as voice, trumpet, clarinet, etc.) including: Applied Music and Recital performance.

Music History, including: Great Composers and Music Masterpieces to 1820, Great Composers and Music Masterpieces After 1820, Survey of Music Literature.

Piano skills, including: Class Piano, Applied Piano and Keyboard Proficiency.

Course offerings for Ensemble Experiences include: Amadeus Chamber Ensemble, Riverside Community Symphony, Concert Choir, College Choir, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Vocal Music Ensembles, Instrumental Chamber Ensembles, Chamber Singers, Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Marching Band, Auxiliary Marching Units, Percussion Ensemble, Gospel Singers, Guitar Ensemble, Piano Chamber Ensemble and Jazz Lab Band.

For students desiring experience and training in music technology, RCC offers a curriculum designed to meet their needs in Digital Audio, including sequencing, recording and publishing.

Course offerings include: Introduction to MIDI and Digital Audio, Sequencing and Orchestration with MIDI and Digital Audio, Music Composition and Film Scoring with Digital Audio, Sound Recording and Reinforcement Techniques and The Business of Music.

For the general student RCC offers many courses that fulfill degree and transfer program requirements for the arts and humanities. Course offerings include Music Appreciation, Jazz Appreciation, Film Music Appreciation, Basic Musicianship, Music Fundamentals and Music of Multicultural America.

RCC has many musical offerings for continuing students and members of the community that wish to continue their musical experiences. Those course offerings include: Introductory classes, including: Class Piano, Class Voice, Class Guitar, Teaching Music to Children and the Business of Music. Ensemble Experience course offerings include: Riverside Community Symphony, Master Chorale, Chamber Choir, Community Jazz Ensemble, Community Concert Band, Gospel Singers, Marching Band, Auxiliary Marching Units and Jazz Lab Band.

b. Programs

1. Piano/Theory

Through the Piano and Theory program all music students are prepared to demonstrate competency and knowledge expected of transfer candidates to four-year institutions. Most courses are offered semi-annually while the remainder is offered annually. Entering music students typically have been involved in just one aspect of the field, such as school band or chorus. To train for a career, they must deepen their knowledge and develop a broad array of skills, including: listening, composing, singing and functional piano. Students with this background are prepared to transfer as students with junior status and for a number of related careers, including: teaching, performing, recording and production.

2. Applied Music

The Applied Music program has made a huge impact in the department. Music majors are expected to study on their instrument each semester of their collegiate career, and at RCC that is a reality. By enrolling in the co-requisite major ensemble students can study with an expert on their instrument. The majority of the students in the major ensembles are currently enrolled in the program.

At the end of each semester each student must perform in a recital and at a jury. A jury is a closed-door final exam performance before the faculty in the related area. This program is probably the most valuable to the students in their acquisition of the requisite skills to be a musician. The program may also be the easiest and most gratifying to access student success.

Courses include: Beginning Applied Music, Intermediate Applied Music and Applied Secondary instruments.

3. Voice/Choral

The Choral/Vocal Music Program at RCC offers students a wide range of musical literature, pedagogy, and understanding of musicality so that they may further their education in this field. Classes currently offered are Chamber Singers, Womens Ensemble, Mens Ensemble, and Private Voice Lessons. In choirs, students learn music from all genres, from Renaissance to Contemporary, while concentrating on history, theory, interpretation of texts, blend (working together as a team), and vocal pedagogy.

The applied music faculty (voice teachers) not only implements everything that is being taught in choral music, but also emphasizes on solo vocal production and performances. Our applied music faculty is also among the finest in Southern California. Many of them have performed or are currently performing with many professional organizations such as Opera Pacific, Pacific Chorale, Long Beach Opera and many others. The choral ensembles at RCC have toured the states and internationally, performing at prestigious events such as the University of Washington Invitational, San Francisco State Invitational, Hawaii, and the Eisteddfod International Choral Competition in Wales. Participation in the Choral/Vocal Music Program at RCC will prepare students to transfer to a four-year university and also get a head start on becoming vocal music educators or performers.

4. Vocal Jazz

The Vocal Jazz program offers vocal students an opportunity to learn, rehearse, and perform vocal jazz repertoire. Through this process, students develop skills which include: ear training, jazz theory, basic vocal technique, vocal jazz technique, microphone technique, style, and performance etiquette. The program currently includes two ensembles: The Vocal Jazz Ensemble and the Vocal Jazz Lab. Since 1999, the Vocal Jazz Ensemble has toured several states in the United States as well as Tokyo, Japan. Additionally, they released their first CD recording, Groovin Hard last October and will soon release a second CD, entitled Fly, this fall. Students who participate in this program generally transfer into the most advanced vocal jazz ensembles at four-year institutions. The knowledge and skills students develop in the Vocal Jazz program also enable them to pursue a career in vocal music as performers, studio musicians and educators.5. Guitar

The RCC Guitar program is enormously successful. It has produced professional guitarists and its graduates have gone on to transfer, in some cases with large scholarships, to prestigious universities and colleges including the University of Redlands, University of California Berkeley, Cal State Fullerton, Cal State Northridge, San Francisco State, University of California Riverside and the Musicians Institute. The program has several tiers. For beginners or guitarists who know how to play but not how to read music, it offers Music 37: Class Guitar.

Class Guitar has been extremely popular and typically has three or four sections every semester. Students who have completed this course or guitarists who have not completed it but can read music and play with some proficiency, can move on to Music 77: Guitar Ensemble.

The Guitar Ensemble performs music written or transcribed for guitar ensemble from the Renaissance to the present day. The group performs on campus in each semester as well as elsewhere in Riverside and Orange County. Additionally, the group has appeared in San Francisco, San Jose, Washington State, and in Canada. Students can enroll in Guitar Ensemble four times. All students who participate in the ensemble are eligible for Music 39/ Intermediate Applied instruction in guitar. Currently there are over twenty guitar students enrolled and have one full time and three adjunct guitar instructors. Like Guitar Ensemble, Music 39 can be taken four times. For those who have completed four semesters of Music 39 and Music 77, but who would like to study guitar further, there is MUSP77/Advanced Guitar Ensemble and MUSP79/Advanced Applied Guitar, both of which can be taken four times.6. Wind and Percussion

The Wind and Percussion area at RCC is considered to be one of the strongest programs in the community college system nation wide. Students come from not only Riverside County, but also from Orange County, San Bernardino County, Los Angeles County and San Diego County to perform with our ensembles and study with our faculty. The ensembles continue to perform at a very high level and the instruction (part time and full time) is paralleled by only the finest of institutions. The applied music faculty at RCC is comprised of some of the finest performers in Southern California. Many of them have performed with ensembles such as, The Los Angeles Philharmonic, The Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, The Pacific Symphony, The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, just to name a few. Many of them are also very active in the Hollywood studios. The applied music program continues to be essential to the education of our students and the continued growth of our programs. Studying with these performers in Applied Music is a draw for many fine players to attend RCC and perform with the Wind Ensemble. Many of the students involved in the wind and percussion area do not apply for an AA. Instead, they focus more on a transfer degree. The curriculum at RCC is set up to mirror the first two years of study at a four - year institution.

The ensembles at RCC receive national recognition from performing at regional and national conventions, taking national and international tours, commissioning, performing, and recording new works for winds and percussion, and sponsoring guest artists and special events. The wind and percussion ensembles at RCC have represented the college in 7 states (including Hawaii) as well as in Japan. The wind ensemble receives invitations each year to attend festivals in Korea, China, Europe, New York, Chicago and Washington D.C. but can not attend due to budget restraints. Over the last five years, the RCC Wind Ensemble has commissioned ten new pieces for winds and percussion. Nine of those compositions were premiered on campus, and the Wind Ensemble recorded five of them. The wind and percussion program sponsors a two-day wind and percussion festival, a high school honor band, a junior high honor band, and a three-day conducting symposium.

Even though the program continues to grow, new developments that have emerged that have caused recruiting more difficult. It seems that others schools in our area can offer better scholarships, better facilities, and priority registration to incoming freshman. To address these issues so we will not see a drop of enrollment numbers and talent RCC needs to build a scholarship program, improve the facilities (especially the Music Building, Landis performing Arts Center and the Marching Band facility) and get priority registration for students identifying themselves as Music majors.

7. Symphony Orchestra

The Symphony Orchestra continues to serve the community more than the traditional RCC music student. Although the orchestra continues to perform at a very high level, there are certain aspects that are keeping it from flourishing. Six years ago, the full time faculty member assigned to the Symphony Orchestra, resigned two weeks before the fall semester started. That position has not been filled. As of spring of 2007, after thirteen years, an adjunct instructor will conduct the RCC Symphony Orchestra. The other major issue in the growth of the Symphony Orchestra is the lack of string programs in the public schools. Due to budget cuts in the 1980s there are very few string programs in our area to recruit from. This is yet another reason for the need of the replacement of the full time position. The discipline feels that in order for this program to grow, a program needs to be established at RCC, to start young string players and eventually create its own recruiting pool.

8. Instrumental Jazz

A comprehensive program is in place for students to study Jazz at Riverside. The campus boasts three Jazz Ensembles, a Jazz Combo program, a Jazz Improvisation and Theory class and a Jazz Performance certificate. In the past ten years Jazz Ensemble I has performed at Chuo University in Tokyo, the Longhorn Jazz Festival at the University of Texas at Austin, the Reno Jazz Festival at the University of Nevada at Reno, The University of Northern Colorado Jazz Festival, Honolulu, Hawaii, Fullerton Jazz festival, California State University Los Angeles Jazz Festival, and numerous concerts hosted by high school, universities and communities, and three times at the International Association for Jazz Education National Conference. And in this time Jazz Ensemble I has only finished in first place in all of the competitive festivals. Jazz Ensemble I also has a recent CD release, Upside Out, distributed internationally by Sea Breeze Vista that was also found on the Grammy Awards Nomination list for best Album by a Large Jazz Group.

9. Digital-Audio/MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface)Digital-Audio/MIDI is a program designed for students to grow musically as composers and arrangers as well as to introduce them to Digital-Audio technology. There is also a MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface)/Digital-Audio certificate program that can be completed in four semesters. Students spend time in the classroom and in the lab learning to compose, orchestrate with MIDI and write music for film and video. The lab has 11 stations. Each station is a Digital-Audio/MIDI workstation, capable of recording sequences, recording samples and preparing notation for print out.

10. Marching Tigers

The RCC Marching Tigers are one of the truly elite college marching bands in the country, with an average fall membership of 200 members and an international reputation. This busy group provides students with the opportunity to perform for thousands of people, while they gain valuable experience in the field of outdoor pageantry something that is necessary for all future band directors.

If there is a football game or basketball game at the college, the band is there. In addition, as the official band of the city of Riverside, if there is a ribbon-cutting,

grand opening, dedication, or other civic function, the band is there. In this capacity,

the band has performed for Senators, Congressmen and Presidents, for mayors, city councilmen, and governors galore.

These well-known college entertainers have been the lead unit in the Tournament of Roses Parade, the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade, Fiesta Bowl Parade, and Hollywood Christmas Parade among others. The marching band celebrated its 20th Anniversary during the 2003-2004 school year, having had nearly 3,000 students pass through the doors of HG101.

Often referred to as Hollywoods Band, they have appeared in more than 16 motion pictures, including The Truman Show, Wag the Dog, Austin Powers, The Other Sister, all of the American Pie projects, Princess Diaries 2 and Coach Carter. In addition, they have been seen in numerous television shows, like the Gilmore Girls and Boston Public and in dozens of TV commercials. The band is often cast by Hollywood to play the part of a high school band in TV shows like the Emmy-winning American Dreams, which ran for 2 season on NBC, several episodes of the Emmy-winning Monk, and a humorous TV commercial for Outpost.com (now Frys Electronics) that won a Cleo Award as the best commercial on television.

They have performed in nearly every pageantry event in the world including the Moomba

Festival in Melbourne, the St. Patricks Day Parade in Dublin, the Edinburgh Easter Festival and the Nice Carnival in France. If theres a parade on New Years Day,

the Marching Tigers have been there whether its London, Paris or Pasadena. They are the only college band to appear twice at the sacred Budokan Hall in Japan.

They are also the only college band to appear a record 5 times at the prestigious Bands of America Grand National Championships, in the RCA Dome, in Indianapolis.

Athletic events are familiar territory for these RCC students, having performed many halftime shows for the Los Angeles Rams, Los Angeles Raiders and San Diego Chargers

as well as opening day for the California Angels. The RCC Band has performed for the Utah Summer Games, the US Olympic Festival and the Disneyland Pigskin Classic. They were the pep band for the 1995 and 1996 John Wooden Classic at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim.

A favorite energy boost among major corporations, the RCC marching band has entertained repeatedly at national conventions for Motorola, Starwood Corporation, Sheraton, the W Group, Mazda, Suzuki, Ford Motor Company, Rite Aid Pharmacy, the Pattison Group, many insurance companies and for Disney. Theyve performed twice at

Sea World and many times at the Hollywood Bowl, most recently as the grand finale in The Music Man.

Because of their international reputation, students come from throughout the southland, from across the nation and from Japan to be a part of this exciting, very large ensemble.

After spending time in this prestigious organization, many go on to work as coaches at various local high schools, and later perform professionally or become teachers.

The biggest problem with the marching band is the lack of a facility to house this world-class program. There isnt a building or space available and this is hurting recruiting, not to mention the effectiveness of the program. A location for a band building has been secured, along with a design for a suitable facility but everything is currently on hold, pending a master plan for the campus.

The active marching band program, with all of its various travels and accomplishments is the most effective publicity tool currently available to the institution. In the words of UCLA band director Gordon Henderson, there is nothing junior about this junior college band! The Marching Tigers are the visible classroom for the college, representing RCC to the public in a unique way that cant be duplicated by any other organization.

Looking ahead, the RCC Band will be appearing in the 80th Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City in November of 2006. They have accepted an invitation to perform in Rome for the 2008 New Years Day celebrations. In addition, representatives for the Olympics in Bejing have called describing plans to have RCC perform for their Olympic Festival at the athletes village and on the Great Wall.

11. Fantasia Winter Guard

One of the few colleges in the nation that offers a winter color guard, RCC provides students with training in the area of movement and manipulation of various props.

A natural offshoot of the various patriotic color guards (guarding the colors is a military tradition) at VFW and American Legion Halls back in the 1950s and 60s, our modern color guards and winter season guards include complex and often theatrical designs.

This audition only indoor pageantry ensemble grew out of the success of the fall marching band program. Going virtually undefeated at the local and regional level from 1985-89, FANTASIA entered the national scene to explore new ways to motivate their members. Since 1990, these hard-working students have an unprecedented record of success, having won the silver medal in Class A at the 1991 WGI Championships in Buffalo, the gold medal in the Open Class at the WGI Championships in 1995 as well as the prestigious Winter Guard International World Class Championship in Dayton, Ohio in 00, 02, 04 and 06.

Performing on a stage that is about the size of a basketball court, in college gyms and professional arenas across the country, FANTASIA attracts talented performers in the area of dance, flag, rifle and saber from several different states and Japan. Graduates from this program have gone on to appear in such productions as the national touring company of the Broadway hit The Lion King and the Tony award-winning show entitled Blast! Many have become entertainers at Disneyland, in Anaheim and Tokyo, while others become teachers in the pageantry arts. Fund raisers for travel expenses have included being hired to perform at various corporate functions, national conventions and in TV shows and movies. Next up: this group has just been invited to appear on the Ellen DeGeneres Show on NBC-TV.

12. Winter Drum Line

Again a natural byproduct of the successful fall marching band, the RCC Winter Drum Line is an audition only indoor percussion ensemble that rehearses outdoors due to the lack of a proper rehearsal facility at the college. After going virtually undefeated in local and regional competition, this 40-member group emerged on the national scene with a bang, winning the WGI gold medal the 2002 World Class Championship in their first year of competition and since then have gone on to post an unprecedented record of achievement, earning a silver medal in 2003 and 2004 and a gold medal in 2005.

They have appeared at national conventions in San Diego, Los Angeles and Las Vegas for numerous corporate functions, at Sea World, Disneyland and in the music video for the hit movie Drumline! Member of this elite group have appeared on the Jerry Lewis Telethon and for the past two summers in the show entitled Sea World Summer Nights.

The RCC Drum Line was featured on an episode of Boston Public and has been seen in numerous movies, television shows and TV commercials.

This group has been so successful that RCC has attracted sponsors, much like major universities and their athletic show contracts. This community college drum-line now receives new percussion equipment, drum heads, cymbals, sticks mallets and other needed performance gear (all worth thousands of dollars) completely free of charge.

Equipment is not a problem, having a usable facility is the problem. Performing members often slip and fall on damp or frozen concrete during evening rehearsals.

Looking ahead: the drum line has received an invitation to appear as the guest exhibition group for the WGI Regional Championships in the Netherlands!

c. Enrollment Trends

The Music Discipline continues to have the one of the largest enrollments at Riverside Community College. In the fall of 2000 there were 2,282 enrolled in music classes and in the fall of 2005 there were 2,267 students enrolled, giving music the 7th largest student count in the district. The six disciplines with more students were: Math, English, P.E., Psychology, Computer Information Systems, and Administration of Justice. There are a total of 84 disciplines district wide.

In the data for fall of 2005, the music discipline shows a success rate of 75.8%. This figure is among the top 15% of the district. Between the fall of 2000 and the fall of 2004 there was total success rate of 69% in the music discipline district wide. The classes evaluated were: Music 19, Music 25, Music 3, Music 30, Music 32, Music 37, Music 39, Music 41, Music 42, Music 48, and Music 8A. Not all of the Music classes were involved in the study.

Data showing enrollment by age, gender and ethnicity shows that almost 40% of the music students in the district were in the 16 19 age group. Another 30% fall in the 20 24 age group and rest of the enrolled students are 25 years old or older. The study also shows that between 2000 and 2004 the ratio between male and female is very close. The total number of district wide enrolled students in those five years was 12,196. Of that number, 5,646 were female and 6,550 were male. A study in diversity has shown that in the years 2000 2004, there were 12,208 students enrolled district wide in the music discipline. Of that number 5,735 were White, 3,249 were Hispanic, 1,389 were African American, 574 were Asian, 342 were undeclared, 335 were Filipino, 132 were native American, 110 were Pacific Islander, and 342 were defined as other.

The data available regarding enrollment by degree objective is incomplete. It is important to note that RCC is one of the few community colleges in the state that does not offer an AA degree in a specific subject. The music faculty suspect that very few music students graduate with an AA from RCC because serious music students are more focused on improving their skills and taking the classes they need to transfer.

D. Student Outcomes Assessment Statement

The music discipline offers several types of courses which require different modes of assessment. The following courses are offered for the general student at RCC fulfilling a Humanities credit: Music Appreciation, Jazz Appreciation and Film Music Appreciation, all of which require text books and CDs. The Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) are clearly stated in the integrated course outline of record for each course. There are several quizzes, essays, concert/film/video reviews and exams that address the SLOs. The music faculty recently updated all course outlines, including updating the SLOs for each course. Discipline meetings were held throughout the 2005-06 academic year in order for faculty to collaborate on SLOs for music courses.

An analysis was completed for the Online Music Appreciation course using the updated course outline and a current final exam (please see Appendix 1). The exam questions are chosen at random by WebCT. Those exam questions were then matched with the course SLOs. Some questions fulfilled more than one SLO. The data shows that the final exam questions are spread evenly over the course SLOs with some SLOs randomly emphasized based on selection from the web-based program. Discussions have begun with present faculty who teach Music 19 to incorporate a more aesthetic approach to learning and artistic expression.

For more advanced students and music majors, the music discipline offers several opportunities to participate in performance ensembles. Many types of assessment accompany performance ensemble classes. Students are evaluated on a daily and ongoing basis. They are given direct feedback of classroom performances immediately to allow for improvement and better understanding of performance techniques. Additionally, students in performance ensembles perform for the public on a regular basis. At these performances students are being evaluated by the general public, other students and faculty.

Additionally, students participating in a 2-credit performance ensemble have the opportunity to take lessons on an individual basis. Most students register for Music 39, or other similar courses and each lesson is evaluated by the instructor. At the completion of each semester an assessment form is completed by the applied instructor and a grade is given. Students are also required to perform a student recital where they perform individually and are evaluated by the general public, other students and faculty. For the final examination students must perform a jury. At this jury each student is evaluated by all faculty in a particular music area. Jury forms are then completed with written comments for the student and a grade assigned based on performance.

An informational survey was completed Spring 2006 by 83 students taking applied lessons (please see Appendix 2). Serious music students are taking a wide range of courses and plan to transfer to a higher educational institution for a 4-year degree. The information from the survey documented that students were taking the appropriate courses needed to fulfill IGETSE and/or an AA degree in order to transfer successfully to California four year institutions. Student comments from the survey indicated that the instructors have been influential in helping them to obtain further education and degree completion, as well as confirm proper class offerings. An overall interpretation of the data and comments indicate that the music discipline at RCC is offering the appropriate courses for student success and transfer and that students are learning and growing musically and academically.

(The following text is taken verbatim from the November 2004 Performing Arts Department Academic Plan submitted to the Dean of Instruction.)

In the performing arts, everything begins in the form of an artistic inquiry. This artistic inquiry generates a series of decisions in regards to diverse areas including, but not limited to: selection and programming, artistic standards within the discipline and genre, determining a challenging yet not overwhelming repertoire, analyzing the actual skills of the musician / dancer / actor, all while addressing the personal aesthetics of the choreographer / director / conductor within the confines of a particular setting, such as a theatre or concert hall. Decisions based on the initial artistic inquiry lead to a rehearsal phase, culminating with a concert, theatrical production, or series of performances, in other words, an artistic product. The success of this product is rarely measured by entrance and exit skills or any other typical form of data collection, nor should it. The artistic vision is an inherently subjective viewpoint, and thus resistant to measurement by Lichert or any other standards. Besides, exactly who would be consulted to measure the progress of any given artistic effort? The audience? The performers? The technical crew? The choreographer / director / conductor? The guest artist? Each of these essential partners has a distinctly varied view of the success or progress of the artistic product.

As the Performing Arts Department at Riverside Community College we not only create a product borne out of artistic inquiry for the students directly involved in these performances / ensembles, but for the countless students who attend these productions. Many are students within the various disciplines who are viewing to critique, support their peers and aspire to perform themselves. Still more are students enrolled in any number of courses such as Introduction to Theater, Music Appreciation, and Dance Appreciation who not only attend for credit, but to enlarge and enhance their own artistic experiences through viewing quality productions and performances. Conducting exit polls of these existing RCC students would be a possible avenue of documenting the effect of viewing live performances to enhance student understanding and appreciation of the performing arts.

As for statistics measuring the ongoing success of our core students, once again, data which is useful for many subject areas does not address the pathway for many of our successful students. Many Performing Arts Department students do not receive an A.A. degree since it does not enhance their ability to transfer. Those who do transfer to a U.C. or Cal State can be documented; however, many go to private arts institutions or programsE. Collaboration with Other Units

The music discipline currently collaborates with other disciplines within the college in a number of ways:

1. RCCs award winning Marching Band provides music for many sporting and ceremonial events on campus and in so doing provides a link between many departments and the general student body.

2. RCCs Wind Ensemble provides music for Convocation and in so doing, in a global sense, collaborates with all disciplines, faculty and students throughout the college.3. Both the Marching Band and the Chamber Singers provide music for graduation ceremonies each spring.4. There are collaborations between music and the other performing arts. Faculty and students from the music discipline have provided music for RCC dance performances and the music theatre courses offered in the theater department provide a link between music and theater. 5. A number of the music courses that are geared towards fulfilling students general education requirements such as Music Appreciation, Jazz Appreciation and Film Music Appreciation deal with social, cultural, artistic and literary issues outside the realm of music. 6. There has been collaboration between faculty members in the music discipline and faculty in the humanities, art and literature. One noteworthy example was the faculty performance/lecture on French music, art and poetry from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. 7. Students have written and performed musical theatre pieces that feature collaboration between the dance, theatre and music programs. 8. Faculty members from different departments have taken music classes to enhance how they teach their own courses. One example is a Spanish professor who studied guitar so as to be able to teach and play Spanish language music for his classes.9. Music courses have been offered on study abroad programs. Such offerings have led to collaborative work between music and faculty members from the other courses offered including the humanities. 10. The Vocal Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble have a joint concert scheduled for November in 2006. F. Outreach

There are a number of ways in which the music discipline does outreach to the broader college community, the local community and to people throughout the state, country and beyond.

1. Concerts on Campus

The program puts on numerous concerts each semester by students, faculty and guest artists for the benefit of the college community and the Riverside community in general. Student groups that perform on campus include Chamber Singers, Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensembles, Symphony Orchestra, College Choir, and Guitar Ensemble. There are numerous student recitals wherein students of particular instruments or voice perform. Faculty members of the college perform on campus every semester and guest artists of international renown appear as well. All of these concerts are advertised such that people both on and off campus are kept aware of them and they are frequently very well attended.

2. Concerts off Campus

A number of the aforementioned ensembles perform off campus as well in order to give our students more performing experience and to do further outreach to the greater community. Some of the local venues that RCC groups have performed at off campus include local high schools, the Riverside Municipal Auditorium, Disneyland, the Fender Museum as well as local homes for the elderly. Our performing groups have played throughout the state, nation and world. A few places where they have performed include: Texas, Colorado, Georgia, Florida, New York (at Carnegie Hall), Northern California, Nevada, Hawaii, Canada and Japan.

3. Community Ensembles

We have a number of ensembles that consist primarily of adults and community members rather than students. Among these ensembles are the Master Chorale, The Symphony Orchestra, and the Evening Jazz Band. Not only do these ensembles offer people outside of the college community an opportunity to participate in music making at the college, but they also perform on and off campus.

4. Festivals

The music discipline sponsors numerous festivals every semester that attract student ensembles from colleges and high schools throughout the state and beyond. Among such events are: the Jazz Festival, Chorale Festival, Concert Band festival, Big Orange Classic, Vocal Jazz festival and Guitar Day. In addition, educational festivals and workshops are offered not only for students, but also for educators. Among these events are the Conductors Symposium and the Jazz Directors Workshop. These events attract music educators to our campus to enhance and better their skills. That, in turn, encourages some of them to send their students to RCC for post secondary education.

G. Resources

a.Staffing

In the District, the Music Discipline currently has a single full-time faculty member on the Moreno Valley campus, none at Norco and eight at Riverside. Moreno Valley has leadership in place to develop a program for that community. Music in Moreno Valley and Norco are part of large multi-disciplinary departments. In Norco the scheduling, hiring and evaluations has been done in recent years by department chairs with no expertise in music, and they frequently ignore requests to collaborate with the Riverside music faculty in regards to scheduling and hiring.

In Riverside, the Music discipline is a part of the Performing Arts Department. That department is comprised of Music, Theater and Dance. Recently the department has been functioning well with a chair elected from one of the disciplines and assistant chairs elected from the other two. This is important since the administration of all three disciplines is complicated. For most performance entities there are Associated Student and District budgets. There are also accompanists, promotional activities, festivals, tours, concerts, guest artists, speakers and specialized equipment that are particular to each discipline that need to be maintained.

The Riverside Campus has full-time faculty in place to serve many areas of the music major transfer program that is in place. The ensembles that serve as the major performing instrumental groups for the campus are: the Marching Band, Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble and Guitar Ensemble. A full-time faculty person directs each of the four ensembles with expertise in those particular areas. The Symphony Orchestra has been directed by a part-time faculty member or a full-time faculty person on overload.

The vocal music/choral area has two full-time faculty members that direct the choirs, chamber singers and vocal jazz ensembles. They also teach and supervise the applied vocal music.

The final two full-time members at Riverside have expertise in piano and theory. They teach the coursework for the second, third and fourth semesters in theory as well as supervise the piano program (first semester theory sections are taught by full and part-time faculty). The piano program serves piano majors, other music majors and students that just want a piano experience.

The Digital Audio/MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) coursework is taught by one full-time faculty and four part-time faculty. This includes two programs: the first with emphasis on sequencing, composing, scoring and notating with MIDI; the second emphasizing the recording arts.

Instrumental music on the Riverside campus is well served by one full-time staff/piano accompanist. The vocal/choral area currently has a part-time accompanist working for them, and at a rate of pay that is low in light of the skill and background needed to be successful in those positions.

b.Facilities

The facilities for music in the district are quite diverse.

The Norco campus has a theater and some access to the Fender Guitar Museum. There is no rehearsal facility or other lab. The theater is also too small to accommodate most concerts that would be done by a major instrumental ensemble.

The Moreno Valley campus has virtually no music facilities. Musical activities and instruction occur in classrooms and multi-purpose rooms.

The Riverside campus has a tradition of outstanding music programs going back many decades and a mission to prepare music majors for transfer. As a result more facilities have been built, in stages, and are available for different kinds of instruction. The structures available are the Digital Library Auditorium, Landis Auditorium, the Marching Band Room in Huntley Gym, the Music Building, Music Annex and Stover Hall.

The Digital Library Auditorium is a beautiful venue, with wonderful acoustics, for student recitals. The hall is used two to six times a week for concerts from the 4th week of each semester until the end.

Landis Auditorium is the big performing venue on the Riverside campus. It has a stage large enough to accommodate the Wind Ensemble, Orchestra or Master Chorale and has 1,400 seats. It is also used extensively for the resident professional, non-instructional musical theater program, Performance Riverside. Though the stage is large enough to accommodate all of the major student ensembles, it is used by all of them as a last resort.

Landis Auditorium is an inadequate facility in almost every way.

Acoustically it is unfit. Sound on stage does not travel past the proscenium, though sounds in the back of the audience easily travel to the stage.

1,400 seats are far too many for all musical functions. The number makes a healthy audience of 400 look like no one attended and demoralizes the students.

The sight lines are poor, with the stage far above most of the audience.

Landis existence also keeps the state from considering ever building another and more useful venue on campus.

The Marching Band Room in Huntley Gym is also inadequate. It was not intended to be a music facility, and is really just a storage facility for the marching band, with there being no hope for them to rehearse inside.

The Music Building houses the choir room, Digital-Audio lab, recording studio (such as it is), piano lab, offices, and practice rooms. The building is over 80 years old and was originally the bookstore for the old Poly High School campus. The air conditioning is intermittent in most rooms, and condition of the building is unsightly at best. The choir room in particular has a low ceiling and air conditioning that does not work on a regular basis. The piano lab was recently redone with new lights, carpet and electrical wiring and is actually a nice room. The rest of the building is makeshift.

The Music Annex is a steel, prefabricated building that is a set of four faculty offices. It works well and is a newer structure.

Stover Hall is also a steel, prefabricated building that works well and is new. It houses the rehearsal room for the wind ensemble, jazz ensembles, orchestra and guitar ensemble. The building also has practice rooms, offices, a smart classroom and storage for music and instruments. The rehearsal room is particularly effective because of excellent acoustics.

The result for the Riverside campus is that there are some very good facilities and some bad facilities.

c.Equipment

The Norco campus has made a minimal investment in equipment and technology for music instruction. The inventory for equipment includes:

Less than twenty music stands

One grand piano

One upright piano

The Moreno Valley campus has made a minimal investment in equipment and technology for music instruction. The inventory for equipment includes:

One grand piano

Two upright pianos

The Riverside campus has made a substantial investment in equipment and technology for music instruction. The inventory for equipment includes:

1 set of Choral risers (in Music 102)

1 set of Choral risers (stored in Music 105, used for concerts)

Grand pianos (4 Yamaha, 2 Steinway)

Upright pianos (12)

Music stands: 20 in the Music building; 50 in the Stover Building; 50 in the Huntley Gym

Wind Instruments, Brass: including tubas, baritones, trombones, flugelhorns

Wind Instruments, Woodwinds: bass clarinet, contra bass clarinet, oboe, English horn, clarinet, flutes, piccolos, 4 baritone saxophones, 2 tenor saxophones, 1 soprano saxophone

Percussion instruments: marimbas, xylophones, vibraphones, chimes, timpani, bass drums, drum sets, gongs, wind machine

String instruments: guitars, basses, 2 electric basses

Sound system for the Vocal Jazz Ensemble Marching Band Our band uniforms are 7 years old

Marching Band mixing board and Yamaha speakers were purchased in 1993

Marching Band outdoor PA system is 8 years oldThe inventory for technology includes:

25 Electric pianos for a piano lab, in Music 104

Stereo equipment (7 systems for classroom use, in Music 100, Music 104, Music 102, Music 105, Stover 100, Stover 118, Huntley Gym)

LCD projectors and screens for class use (in Music 102, Music 100, MUSIC 104, Stover 100)

11 G4 Apple Macintosh computers for the Digital-Audio lab

2 G5 Apple Macintosh computers for the Digital-Audio lab

1 Mackie 32x8 Mixing board for the recording class in Music 103-k

6 Shure microphones

3 AKG microphones

2 Guitar amplifiers

2 bass amplifiers 3 controllers for electronic/digital pianos in MUS 104

d.Other Resources

The Riverside City Campus supports the music program by providing the following library and learning support services:

The Instructional Media Center (IMC) and Tutorial Services which are both based in the Digital Library Learning and Resource Center. The Instructional Media Center installs, maintains, and delivers equipment to aid educational activities to all classrooms on campus including those used for music. The Tutorial Services helps music students better prepare for classes and provides a supportive learning environment in many subject areas including MUS 3, 4, 5, 6, 32 and others.

In addition to the DLLRC, students have access to the newly-renovated Martin Luther King, Jr. Teaching and Learning Center (MLK TLC). This resource provides centralized access to campus computer labs. Currently, access to all labs is restricted to students enrolled in a lab practicum course or courses with a lab component. Music students use the lab for music theory and ear training. The Moreno Valley and Norco campus libraries serve their respective campuses as part of the RCCD Library system. The Instructional Media Center at Moreno Valley and Norco campuses provide similar instructional support as the Riverside IMC. Tutorial Services are also available to music students at Moreno Valley and Norco campuses through the office of Student Services. Students may physically access the library and other learning support services during the hours of operation, which are coordinated with the class schedule. Although library hours vary at all three campuses, students may conduct research in the field of music via LAMP, the librarys web site. The Electronic Resources link http://library.rcc.edu/eresources.htm takes students to Grove Music Online and to the following full text periodicals: Action, Criticism & Theory for Music Education, American Music Teacher, American Record, Bass Player, Black Music Research Journal, British Postgraduate Musicology, Canadian Musician, Echo, Electronic Musician, Electronic Musicological Review, General Music Today, Guitar Player, International Journal of Community Music, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, Journal of Seventeenth-Century Music, Journal of the American Musicological Society, Keyboard, Music and Anthropology, Music Educators Journal, Music Theory Online, Music Therapy Today, Music Week, Musical Times, Notes, Opera Canada, Opera News, Philosophy of Music Education Review, Popular Music and Society, Popular Musicology Online, Remix, Revista Musical Chilena [Spanish text], Sing Out, Teaching Music, Update: The Applications of Research in Music Education, and Women & Music. The combined total materials with call numbers between M1 and MT9999 for the three district libraries are as follows: 521 Scores 2,633 Books 152 videos/DVDs 6 sound recordings cataloged 360 sound recordings not yet input/cataloged 13 computer optical discs 39 e-books The Riverside Campus has several libraries of sheet music for the ensembles and a library of recordings for the appreciation and survey of music classes.

The CD libraryconsists of 450 CDs that are available to be checked-out by the faculty. CDs in the collection have been donated or purchased through district funding.The Choral Ensembles library has been able to expand yearly through district funding and because of this it is updated with new titles, newly published choral literature and many major works. All of the music is currently stored in the choir room in a Wenger choral library organizer. There are over a thousand titles in choral octavos and approximately fifty major works collection that have been collected over thirty years.Each year, the District provides funds for the purchase of instructional supplies. With those funds, a library of music has been developed for the Vocal Jazz Ensemble over the past seven years. The majority of repertoire for the Vocal Jazz Ensemble is currently housed in a faculty office. Sufficient funds have been provided for the purchase of new vocal jazz charts as well as standard charts that every school should have in its library. In addition to those charts, several commissions have been added. Additionally, the library has been very helpful in providing requested materials. Continued efforts are in place to update materials in the library for vocal jazz and vocal music.

The library also has some sheet music for guitar and some books on the history and repertoire of the instrument. The IMC has been very helpful in providing support for guitar classes by supplying electronic devices when needed and in helping with access to the Digital Library Auditorium when needed.

The Jazz Ensemble library includes 1,500 titles, including arrangements and original works for the jazz orchestra.

The current library located in the Piano lab provides instructional tools to instructors as well as learning materials to students enrolled in any of the several sections of piano classes. It contains solo piano music (from easy to intermediate difficulty levels), sight-reading texts and scores for piano duets. Yearly district funding has enabled the purchase of teaching materials necessary for the successful instruction of piano at RCC.The Riverside Community College wind band library continues to grow each year. Due to the passion of previous conductors, the library contains most of the standard literature for winds. Over the past 5 years, district funds have been used to purchase replacement parts for the standard literature, as well as updating the library with more current literature. Currently, the wind band library is stored in its own room withinthe Stover Music Hall and contains over 800 titles ranging from standard literature to literature written specifically for the RCC Wind Ensemble.

The RCC Symphony orchestra library is stored with the Jazz library in the Stover Music Hall. It contains approximately 250 titles ranging from major symphonies to small string orchestra works. Many of the pieces purchased before the 2000 2001 academic year are incomplete and virtually useless to the ensemble. Each year, district funds are used to purchase new music and to replace missing parts. Due to the average size of the orchestra each year, a majority of the music purchased over the years is selected from the Baroque and Classic periods of music. There are a few pieces from the Romantic period and very few from the 20th Century.

TOPIC II: Where do we want to be?

A.Environment Scan The Music Discipline wants to be the premier destination for students in the Inland Region wanting to pursue a post secondary education in Music. The programs and faculty are almost completely in place. The facilities, though, need to be addressed so that RCC is on par with Fullerton, Mt. San Antonio, Mt. San Jacinto, San Bernardino Valley, Crafton and Citrus colleges. These institutions have superior performing venues. Several of these institutions also have Priority Registration in place for music majors. This is a tremendous incentive for prospective students, and one that RCC music needs to compete in the recruitment efforts for the best students.

Faculty commitment of their time is currently considerable. Though each music performance ensemble program is unique, most major ensemble directors are currently:

Hosting a festival at least once during the year that brings 20-100 high school ensembles to the campus.

Bringing 3 to 6 guest artists to perform and work with students.

Giving 1 to 3 significant performances on campus per semester.

Giving up to 9 performances on high school campuses each semester.

Hosting 1 to 2 honor groups per school year.

Touring once per school year to a premier music event or festival.

Spending 20 to 50 hours per school year visiting local high school programs and recruiting.

B. Internal ReviewThe music faculty are committed to maintaining and building upon the excellence currently found in all of its programs. To do this, improvements are needed in resources, especially with facilities and equipment. The discipline will also pursue a renewed commitment to regularly participate in productions with the other performing arts disciplines and make a commitment to have retention and success rates that regularly lead the district.

Collaboration with other UnitsMusic can increase collaboration with other disciplines in a number of ways.

As there are classes being taught in the humanities department that incorporate music, student and faculty musicians could give guest lectures and performances in those classes.

More musical theatre productions using student and/or faculty musicians, actors and dancers and productions written and/or choreographed by students or faculty.

More interdisciplinary events.

Students and/or faculty from art could be enlisted to provide sets for the musical theater productions listed above.

More mixed media pieces between music, theatre art and dance.

More music classes could be offered in conjunction with the study abroad programs.

Student Enrollments and success

A look at the top 5 enrolled classes for the three campuses in the fall of 2005 show:

Riverside with 1,825, Norco with 164, Moreno Valley with 278 enrolled spaces

Success rates with Riverside with 75.2%, Norco with 80.6%, Moreno Valley with 77.2%

Retention rates with Riverside with 90.4%, Norco with 89.4%, Moreno Valley with 92.4%

This would seem to indicate that the large majority (81%) of music students in the district are at the Riverside campus. Additionally, all three campuses have good success (with an average of 77.6%) and retention rates (with an average of 90.73%). Keeping in mind that this particular semester was quite a challenging one in the entire state for enrollment, the discipline seems to be quite successful.

Outreach

The current level of outreach is strong. In our immediate community its possible to bring music to more people who do not have access to our campus including hospitals and homes for the elderly. Its possible to attract more people from outside the campus community to participate in our ensembles and attend our concerts. There is also a desire to pursue more travel to places throughout the nation and world and to be able to bring more guest artists of international renown to perform on campus as such events act as outreach through the number of people they attract to the campus.

Resources

Staffing

Several key positions are needed to sustain existing programs, or help them expand to where they need to be. The Symphony Orchestra and Recording Arts programs are in need of a fulltime faculty person. The instrumental music program has also grown such that there is a need for a second band director to serve all of the students that want to participate. There is also an urgent need for another full-time staff piano accompanist.

The Symphony Orchestra has been directed by a part-time faculty or full-time faculty member on overload. For the string and orchestra program to flourish, it needs a full-time faculty member with expertise in orchestral repertoire and string pedagogy. A beginning and intermediate program will need to be built that will eventually feed the orchestra. Until that position is added, with the emphasis on building from the bottom up, the Orchestra will continue to be a Community Ensemble.

The Digital Audio/MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) coursework is taught by one part-time faculty and four part-time faculty. This includes two programs: the first with emphasis on sequencing, composing, scoring and notating with MIDI; the second emphasizing the recording arts. This area needs a full-time faculty person to further develop the program with expertise in the recording arts.

The instrumental program has also grown such that there is a need for a full-time faculty person to direct a concert band. This ensemble will need a person that will work to recruit for it and has expertise in the appropriate repertoire and beginning and intermediate wind and percussion pedagogy.

The vocal/choral area needs a full-time piano accompanist to better serve their needs. They currently have two part-time accompanists working for them, and the rate of pay is low in light of the skill and background needed to be successful in those positions.

Due to the high volume of activities in Music, staff help is needed for marketing and logistics, including designing websites, brochures, arranging performances, overall advertising, and promotions and fund raising.Facilities

The Norco campus needs a rehearsal facility or other lab. The theater is too small to accommodate most concerts that would be done by a major instrumental ensemble. The addition of a choir room (rehearsal classroom) should be a part of planning for the near future, and a piano lab is needed to be able to offer a more complete music curriculum, especially for theory and class piano.

The Moreno Valley campus needs music facilities. Musical activities and instruction currently occur in classrooms and multi-purpose rooms. The addition of a choir room (rehearsal classroom) should be a part of planning for the near future, and a piano lab is needed to be able to offer a more complete music curriculum, especially for theory and class piano.

The Riverside campus needs to renovate or replace some facilities.

Landis Auditorium is an inadequate facility in almost every way.

Acoustically it is unfit. Sound on stage does not travel past the proscenium, though sounds in the back of the audience easily travel to the stage.

1,400 seats are far too many for all musical functions. The number makes a healthy audience of 400 look like no one attended and demoralizes the students.

The sight lines are poor, with the stage far above most of the audience.

The best solution for the students would be to replace Landis auditorium with a 500-seat facility, with great attention to the acoustics. The next best solution would be to extensively refit the auditorium in the following ways:

A complete acoustic treatment that may require substantial reconstruction.

Substantial reconstruction in the seating area so that seating for 400 or 500 can be sectioned off from the back. This would keep from demoralizing students for smaller turnout and may help acoustically.

Landis existence also keeps the state from considering another new building that would be a more useful venue on campus.

The Marching Band Room in Huntley Gym is similarly inadequate. It was not intended to be a music facility, and is really just a storage facility for the marching band, with there being no hope for them to rehearse inside. The Marching Band is in need of a new space.

The Music Building houses the choir room, Digital-Audio lab, recording studio (such as it is), piano lab, offices, and practice rooms. The building is over 80 years old and was originally the bookstore for the old Poly High School campus. The air conditioning is intermittent in most rooms, and condition of the building is not up to standards. The choir room in particularly needs a much higher ceiling and air conditioning that works on a regular basis. The piano lab was recently redone with new lights, carpet and electrical wiring and is actually a nice room. The rest of the building is makeshift.

The best solution for the Music Building would be to build a better facility. None of the rooms were constructed with their current purpose in mind. Equipment

The Norco campus and Moreno Valley campus have a minimal amount of equipment for music instruction. This includes a couple of pianos, a few music stands and audio/visual equipment that can be used to teach music appreciation classes. They need a full piano lab for each.

Since the Riverside campus has made a substantial investment in equipment and technology for music instruction, the needs there are less for starting programs than they are for supporting existing ones.

Budget

The Moreno Valley and Norco campuses have minimal budgets to go with their minimal programs. As their programs expand the budgets should also expand accordingly.

The Riverside Campus has a good working budget for maintaining their programs in respect to supplies (mostly sheet music for their libraries), instructional hourly aids (students that are ensemble librarians or technology lab monitors) and travel for ensembles to tour.

Capital Outlay funding is available on a yearly basis depending on the success of the lobbying efforts of the faculty and chair. This is needed for things like instrumental ensembles needing to replace bigger equipment occasionally. Maintaining currency is an absolute struggle for music technology though. Computers need to be replaced every 3 to 6 years to stay current with the software. There needs to be available funding in Capital Outlay for replacing the CPUs on a regular schedule and the annual upgrade of all of the software. To maintain the Riverside Digital/Audio lab an annual budget is needed of about $12,000.00 to keep up with software upgrades and replace cables and broken equipment. Every three or four years, there needs to be a substantial investment to replace the computers and other expensive equipment (like synthesizers) to remain current with technology.

Summary

With over 2200 students in the district, a success rate of 77.6% and a retention rate of 90.73, the Music Discipline is vital. The majority of the offerings, students and facilities in the District music are on the Riverside campus. Half of the facilities in Riverside are inadequate, are yet to be developed in Moreno Valley, and though there is a theater in Norco, there no dedicated teaching space.

All but one of the full-time faculty are located on the Riverside campus. Most of them are on a Teaching Assignment with an overload, and do hundreds of hours outside the class room in recruiting, events, touring and outreach.

The funding is in place for the programs in Riverside, though it will need to be developed at the other two campuses. The funding needs to be in place to regularly replace the computers in the Digital Audio lab and some big equipment for the large ensembles.

Norco needs to hire a full-time faculty instructor in choral music to develop a college choir and coordinate the music appreciation and class piano offerings. Riverside needs a Symphony Orchestra Director, Digital Recording Arts Specialist and possible a second band director.

Despite these needs, music is thriving at RCC.

Topic III What do we need to get there?

The goals for each campus differ, though the most important one is a unified approach to music instruction throughout the district. This includes communication and agreement in scheduling, curriculum and a mission.

A most important consideration should be whether or not the district can afford to split the program dedicated to music majors beyond the Riverside campus. The considerations for this are facilities, faculty and the quality of experience enjoyed by students when they are in an environment with peers in a common goal. Splitting the finite student body of music majors will reduce the numbers such that the quality of experience will be significantly degraded for all ensemble performers. In particular, instrumental students need many years of experience before they have enough skill to participate in the better ensembles at RCC. Splitting the finite amount of instrumental students available in the district will greatly diminish the experience for all of them. RCC-Riverside currently recruits better than UCR, CSU San Bernardino and most universities in California. Splitting the programs would require all three campuses to recruit at this level, and against one another, without damaging one another.

For example: should the District decide to go from 1 to 3 instrumental music programs, the results would be:

the finite amount of talent will then be split into thirds

in the brass; the need for 4 trumpets, 4 trombones, 2 tubas would become 12 trumpet, 12 trombones and 6 tuba players. There are not that many players playing those instruments currently in the district ready to attend RCC.

In the woodwinds; the need for 6 flute, 8 clarinets, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 5 saxophones, 1 bass clarinet, would all triple. There are not that many players playing those instruments currently in the district ready to attend RCC.

the campuses would compete against one another for talented students

the Moreno Valley and Norco campuses would need to spend millions of dollars in facilities and equipment resources to build a minimal needs for a program

the Moreno Valley and Norco campuses would need to recruit full-time faculty for instruction and to recruit students.

The Norco Campus goal is to acquire a full-time faculty person to guide the development of its music program and help decide what facilities and additional resources are needed.

The Moreno Valley Campus needs additional facilities and resources. These should include a classroom with an excellent sound and projection system. A piano lab would also enable the campus to offer class piano and music fundamentals classes.

The Riverside campus has a mission to develop music majors and /or students that will transfer as music majors. As a result, the campus has goals that include faculty, facilities and resources. Riverside needs to address the replacement or improvement the Marching Band Room in Huntley Gym, Landis Auditorium and the Music building. The faculty needs to include a Symphony Orchestra Director, and a Digital-Audio Recording specialist. There is also a need for a full-time choral piano accompanist. Resource goals should include the construction of a digital recording studio and regularly scheduled replacement and upkeep of the computers and equipment in the digital-audio lab.

And finally, the experience for all is enhanced by the participation of particularly talented music students. Full-time faculty spend many hours each week in recruiting these future student leaders. A new carrot is now offered for the better students by competing institutions. Priority registration is now offered to talented students. Considering that in each semester a music student must schedule a theory, piano, ensemble and applied music class as well as a minimum of two general education classes, this would be a tremendous help for current students and a great inducement for those students considering RCC as a future destination.

Immediate Moreno Valley and Norco campus needs:

Capital outlay for a piano lab for both campuses should include:

24 station piano lab

Piano keyboard visualizer

Projector and screen for digital presentations

Amp, speakers, other audio visual equipment for a piano lab

Instructional supplies, money to build and maintain a library of sheet music for a major ensemble Instructional Student Aid, funding for student help for the major ensemble director to maintain the library and to help oversee and maintain a piano labImmediate Riverside Campus equipment needs:

4 Yamaha flugelhorns

2 Yamaha soprano saxophones

2 Double Basses with cases

1 A clarinet

4 Conn 8d French Horns

2 Miraphone Tubas

1 Euphonium

1 set of chimes

1 Rosewood Marimba

1 High Pitched Tympani

2 C trumpets

20 music stands Quality classical and electric guitars

Midi guitars

More guitar amplifiers

Guitar effects and pedals Marching Band needs 40 music stands

40 folding chairs for the marching band room

outdoor podium system from Jarvis for the Marching Band

Mixing board and speakers for use in the stadium

Performance tarp for winter drum line Performance tarp for winter color guard (pageantry group)Immediate Riverside Campus technology needs:

To replace and add to aging equipment in the Digital-Audio Lab and recording studio, including:

24 Apple Mac Pro computers

24 16 channel mixing boards

24 Roland 2080 synthesizer modules

24 Korg Triton Synthesizer keyboards

24 AKG 300 Condensor microphones

12 Neumann Condensor microphones

5 Genelec active studio monitors

24 microphone stands

1 ProTools design mixing board

25 ProTools software packages

25 Digital performer software packages

25 Sibelius software packages

25 Reason software packages

25 Band In a Box software packages

25 Mach V software packages

25 Symphonic Instrument software packages

lcd projector and screen for Stover 118

single touch (direct to CD) recording system in Stover 118 Video projection system for Huntley Gym Band Room

Outdoor portable PA system (Anchor Audio) for the Marching band

Roland SP-404 sampler for the Marching band +dbx crossover unit for the Marching bandCapital Outlay funding is available on a yearly basis depending on the success of the lobbying efforts of the faculty and chair. This is needed for items such as instrumental ensembles needing to replace bigger equipment occasionally. Maintaining currency is an absolute struggle for music technology though. Computers need to be replaced every 3 to 6 years to stay current with the software. Available funding needs to be in Capital Outlay for replacing the CPUs on a regular schedule and the annual upgrade of all of the software. To maintain the Riverside Digital/Audio lab an annual budget is needed of about $12,000.00 to keep up with software upgrades and replace cables and broken equipment. In order to remain current with technology, every three or four years there needs to be a substantial investment to replace the computers and other expensive equipment (like synthesizers).Topic IV: What evidence do we need to track our progress?

The single best thing that could happen to help track RCC Music students success would be for RCC to offer a Music Major/Music Associates Degree based upon the transfer requirements for UC and CSU institutions. The Music Discipline suspects that the majority of RCC music students transfer to other institutions and do not complete AA degrees. We dont know this for certain because until very recently, we have not been able to track students without a declaration of a major.

Topic V: How can we improve the discipline self study process?

To prevent full-time faculty overload when working on the self-study process the music department needs to hire more full-time faculty. This would allow the department to use the time allotted more efficiently.

TOPIC VI Summarize Goals

A unified approach to music instruction throughout the district. This includes communication and agreement in scheduling, curriculum and a mission.

A clear communication from the RCCD to not split the program dedicated to music majors beyond the Riverside campus.

The Norco campus has goals that include faculty, facilities and resources. Specifically:

Acquire a full-time faculty person for the Norco Campus goal to guide the Development of its music program and help decide what facilities and additional resources are needed.

Add a 24 station piano lab.

A dedicated classroom with an excellent sound system.

The Moreno Valley campus has goals that include faculty, facilities and resources. Specifically:

Add a 24 station piano lab.

A dedicated classroom with an excellent sound system.

The Riverside campus has goals that include faculty, facilities and resources.

Riverside needs to address the replacement or improvement of the Marching Band Room in Huntley Gym, Landis Auditorium and the Music building.

Faculty needs include a Symphony Orchestra Director, and a Digital-Audio Recording specialist.

Staff needs include a full-time choral piano accompanist.

Resources goals should include the construction of a digital recording studio and regularly scheduled replacement and upkeep of the computers and equipment in the digital-audio lab.

Priority registration for Music Majors to compete in recruiting.

Appendix 1:

SLO Assessment for Music 19 (Music Appreciation).

Music 19 SLOs

(number of questions that apply to the SLO in the Integrated Course Outline of Record)

SLO I25

SLO II21

SLO III8

SLO IV10

SLO V18

SLO VI 29

SLO VII10

Music 19 SLO's

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

SLO I

SLO II

SLO III

SLO IV

SLO V

SLO VI

SLO VII

Music 19 SLO's

SLO I: Recognize musical styles from the major periods in Western music history.

SLOII: Describe formal structures used in music of the Western European tradition.

SLO III: Identify aurally musical themes and compositions from the great works of the Western tradition.

SLO IV: Listen to and discuss various styles of music.

SLO V: Evaluate historical events that influenced musical development, in Western culture.

SLO VI: Compare the music of various style periods.

SLO VII: Examine musical selections in the context of aesthetic principles.

Discipline: Music

Degree Credit __X_

Non Credit ____

Nondegree Credit ____

Comm Service ____

RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

INTEGRATED COURSE OUTLINE of RECORD

MUSIC 19COURSE DESCRIPTION 3 Units

MUSIC APPRECIATION

PREREQUISITE: None.

A comprehensive study of musical style, form, and materials, organized to acquaint the student

with representative musical literature through listening, reading and writing. 54 hours lecture.

SHORT DESCRIPTION FOR CLASS SCHEDULE

The study of musical style, form, and materials, organized to acquaint the student with representative musical literature through listening, reading and writing.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

1.Recognize musical styles from the major periods in Western musical history.

2.Describe formal structures used in music of the Western European tradition.

3. Identify aurally musical themes and compositions from the great works of the Western tradition.

4. Listen to and discuss various styles of music.

5. Evaluate historical events that influenced musical development, in Western culture.

6. Compare the music of various style periods.

Examine musical selections in the context of aesthetic principles.

COURSE CONTENT

TOPICS1.Elements and materials of music

2.Musical instruments and ensembles

3.Medieval and Renaissance music

4. Musical forms

5. The Baroque era, vocal, and instrumental music

6. Eighteenth-Century Classicism

7. The Nineteenth Century: Romanticism, art song, piano pieces, program music, absolute music, choral and dramatic music, ballet, and opera

8. The Twentieth Century: Impressionism, Expressionism, Nationalism, American music, popular styles, new trends, world music, electronic music, minimalism, post-minimalism

9. Jazz, popular music, and musical theater, in the United States

Students are also assigned reading, writing and other outside assignments equivalent to two hours per one hour lecture.

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION

Methods of instruction used to achieve course objectives may include, but are not limited to:

Present class lectures/discussions in order to introduce material to students so they may gain knowledge in the course topics.

Show videos/films/audio recordings in order for students to hear and view music from various periods and styles so that they will be better prepared to fulfill the student learning outcomes.

Create and assign group activities/discussion so that students will be able to further discuss and evaluate musical styles and historical events.

Conduct individual conferences to further discuss course topics and/or to discuss student progress in the student learning outcomes.

Invite guest lecturers to class in order to discuss specific course topics and/or to demonstrate musical styles and literature through performance.

Develop and assign web-based/web-enhanced/online/distance learning tasks/activities such as web quests, web site reviews, Internet presentations, discussion board postings and online essay submissions.

METHODS OF EVALUATION

Students will be evaluated for progress in and mastery of learning objectives by methods of evaluation, which may include, but are not limited to:

Oral reports/presentations designed to evaluate student learning of musical styles, form and historical events that influenced musical development.

Written reports/presentations designed to evaluate the individual students cognition of specific course topics.

Quizzes/examinations designed to evaluate student progress and knowledge in course topics.

Class and individual projects designed to evaluate student understanding of specific course topics.

Final examination designed to evaluate student knowledge of the learning outcomes and course topics.

COURSE MATERIALSAll materials used in this course will be periodically reviewed to insure that they are appropriate for college level instruction. Possible texts include:

Machlis, Joseph and Kristine Forney, The Enjoyment of Music, 9th ed. Shorter, W.W. Norton & Co., Inc., 2002. With 4 enhanced CDs (audio or CD ROM), Student Resource CD and the accompanying WebBOOK.

A CURRENT ONLINE MUSIC APPRECIATION EXAM

Question 1(1 point)In the Classical era, the most common type of chamber music was the trio sonata.

a. True

b. False

Question 2(1 point)Classical-era composers often performed their own works in concerts

a. True

b. False

Question 3(1 point)What is the form of the second movement of Haydns Surprise Symphony?

a. sonata-allegro

b. theme and variations

c. minuet and trio

d. rondo

Question 4 (1 point)How many movements are in Beethovens Pathtique Sonata?

a. two

b. three

c. four

d. five

Question 5 (1 point)

The Italian words da capo are commonly found in __________ form.

a. binary

b. ternary

c. theme and variations

d. sonata

Question 6(1 point)Chamber music is composed for a small ensemble with one player per part.

a. True

b. False

Question 7(1 point)

Which is NOT a work by Haydn?

a. The Creation

b. The London Symphonyc. The Messiahd. The Lord Nelson MassQuestion 8(1 point)

An extra piece performed at the end of a concert in response to audience applause is called:

a. An addendum.

b. An encore.

c. A finale.

d. An intermission.

Question 9 (1 point)

The third movement of a Classical symphony is most frequently in:

a. minuet and trio form.

b. theme and variations form.

c. rondo form.

d. sonata-allegro form.

Question 10 (1 point)

Mozarts first-movement concerto form consists of an opening ritornello by orchestra followed by the soloist with its own exposition.

a. True

b. False

Question 11(1 point)

Which best describes the opening idea of Beethovens Symphony No. 5?

a. a three-note motive

b. a four-note motive

c. a rocket theme

d. a dance-like theme

Question 12(1 point)

Haydns orchestras in London were smaller than his earlier ensembles.

a. True

b. False

Question 13(1 point)

Thematic development occurs in all musical works, no matter what the size.

a. True

b. False

Question 14(1 point)

How many movements are in a Classical concerto?

a. two

b. three

c. four

d. six

Question 15 (1 point)

The percussion section of the modern orchestra includes a number of instruments of Turkish origin.

a. True

b. False

Question 16(1 point)

Eine kleine Nachtmusik:

a. is German for A Little Night Music.

b. is an example of program music.

c. is an symphony for full orchestra.

d. all of the above.

Question 17(1 point)

Mozarts Piano Concerto in G major, K. 453, opens with:

a. piano alone.

b. piano and orchestra.

c. orchestra alone.

d. violin solo and orchestra.

Question 18(1 point)

What is the form of the second movement of Beethovens Symphony No. 5?

a. theme and variations

b. sonata

c. A-B-A

d. Rondo

Question 19 (1 point)

Beethoven belonged to a generation of artists who were influenced by the full impact of:

a. the French Revolution.

b. the collapse of the Hapsburg dynasty.

c. the American Revolution.

d. the Industrial Revolution.

Question 20(1 point)

The early Classical symphony was characterized by quickly ascending themes with a strong rhythmic drive. These are known as:

a. steamroller themes.

b. torpedo themes.

c. rocket themes

d. operatic themes.

Question 21(1 point)

How did comic opera differ from opera seria?

a. It was sung in the vernacular.

b. It presented down-to-earth plots.

c. It featured ensemble as well as solo singing.

d. All of the above.

Question 22(1 point)

Puccinis Madame Butterfly ends:

a. happily.

b. tragically.

c. triumphantly.

d. inconclusively, so that a sequel could follow.

Question 23(1 point)

In Berliozs Symphonie fantastique, what is the ide fixe?

a. a chant from the Mass for the Dead appearing in the finale.

b. A shepherd song in the third movement.

c. the basic theme of the symphony, heard in all movements

d. a theme and variations, heard in the march movement.

Question 24(1 point)

Which is NOT true of an aria?

a. It is often in de capo (A-B-A) form.

b. It is usually an emotional comment on the action.

c. It is generally disjunct in style, with sparse accompaniment.

d. It can be sung out of the context of the opera, because of its audience appeal.

Question 25(1 point)

The Industrial Revolution produced less expensive musical instruments but with no technical improvements.

a. True.

b. False.

Question 26(1 point)

In the latter part of the eighteenth century, new opera types were devised that featured naturalness and simplicity.

a. True.

b. False.

Question 27(1 point)

Mozarts The Marriage of Figaro is an example of opera buffa.

a. True.

b. False.

Question 28(1 point)

The aria La donna mobile from Verdis Rigoletto, is set in a simple, strophic form with a refrain.

a. True.

b. False.

Question 29(1 point)

Brahms symphonies use a Romantic harmonic idiom but are Classical in form.

a. True.

b. False.

Question 30 (1 point)

Which of the following is NOT a type of orchestral program music?

a. concerto

b. symphonic poem

c. incidental music

d. program symphony

Question 31(1 point)

Which musical element of Clara Schumanns Scherzo Op. 10 is particularly characteristic of the Romantic style?

a. expanded form.

b. dissonance

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