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Mental health services have adapt- ed over the years in response to the needs of our community and chang- es in the healthcare environment. While procedures, practices, and services change, Four County’s com- mitment to their values and mission have not wavered. Clinical Services in many ways serves as a “hub” to the agency pro- viding core services for the commu- nity and connecting individuals with other departments within the agency. Outpatient assessments and counsel- ing therapy sessions provide the in- formation necessary for referral for medication management, specialized services for children or adults, treat- ment for substance disorders or cri- sis intervention. Four County offers same-day admis- sion appointments, evening hours for clinical services, and 24-hour crisis response services to meet indi- viduals and families in their time of need. Our clinical providers receive evidenced-based trainings focused on client engagement, risk assessment, and treatment of individuals with co-occurring mental health and sub- stance disorders. It is essential for our departments to engage individuals and families at- risk and work with our community partnerships such as law enforce- ment, hospitals, court systems, so- cial services, and other healthcare providers. Together they provide the needed support for patients to re- main in their home and community during their recovery from a behav- ioral health condition. Mental health, substance abuse, and primary care have integrated in order for individuals and families to achieve both emotional and physical wellness. The goal is to have reduced utilization of inpatient care without compro- mising the safety of people. Out- comes are tracked and monitored with evidenced-based practices and increased emphasis on crisis care to provide meaningful measures for future levels of care. The link between mental and physi- cal health is often called a mind- body connection. Caring for one’s mind, as well as one’s body, is good for overall health, and a key to suc- cess at home, work, at school or at play. Just as we monitor our bod- ies for potential problems or pain, we need to be aware of our mental health and recognize when it needs some attention. Four County Mental Health Center Is Here For You Mental Health Matters Serving Chautauqua, Cowley, Elk, Montgomery and Wilson County Independence (620) 331-1748 Coffeyville (620) 251-8180 Cowley (620) 221-9664 or (620) 442-4540 Emergency Services (800) 499-1748 www.fourcounty.com Four County Mental Health Center Is Here For You • Children Deserve Toxin-Free Parents • Staff Anniversaries • Healthy Minds Are Important • Alcohol Free Weekend • Parent Power Social Workers Help Create Better Tomorrows • Mark Your Calendars Easier Gambling Access Poses Problems • Eating Disorder Are Illnesses, Not Lifestyle Choices Volume 8: Issue 1 - 2018
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Mental Health Matters - Four County

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Page 1: Mental Health Matters - Four County

Mental Health Mat t e r s Volume 8: Issue 1 - 2018

Mental health services have adapt-ed over the years in response to the needs of our community and chang-es in the healthcare environment. While procedures, practices, and services change, Four County’s com-mitment to their values and mission have not wavered.Clinical Services in many ways serves as a “hub” to the agency pro-viding core services for the commu-nity and connecting individuals with other departments within the agency. Outpatient assessments and counsel-ing therapy sessions provide the in-formation necessary for referral for medication management, specialized services for children or adults, treat-ment for substance disorders or cri-sis intervention.Four County offers same-day admis-sion appointments, evening hours

for clinical services, and 24-hour crisis response services to meet indi-viduals and families in their time of need. Our clinical providers receive evidenced-based trainings focused on client engagement, risk assessment, and treatment of individuals with co-occurring mental health and sub-stance disorders.It is essential for our departments to engage individuals and families at-risk and work with our community partnerships such as law enforce-ment, hospitals, court systems, so-cial services, and other healthcare providers. Together they provide the needed support for patients to re-main in their home and community during their recovery from a behav-ioral health condition. Mental health, substance abuse, and primary care have integrated in order

for individuals and families to achieve both emotional and physical wellness. The goal is to have reduced utilization of inpatient care without compro-mising the safety of people. Out-comes are tracked

and monitored with evidenced-based practices and increased emphasis on crisis care to provide meaningful measures for future levels of care. The link between mental and physi-cal health is often called a mind-body connection. Caring for one’s mind, as well as one’s body, is good for overall health, and a key to suc-cess at home, work, at school or at play. Just as we monitor our bod-ies for potential problems or pain, we need to be aware of our mental health and recognize when it needs some attention.

Four County Mental Health Center Is Here For You

DOn’t start your day with thebroken pieces ofyesterDay. Mental Health

Mat t e r s

Serving Chautauqua, Cowley, Elk, Montgomery and Wilson County

Independence(620) 331-1748

Coffeyville(620) 251-8180

Cowley(620) 221-9664 or

(620) 442-4540

Emergency Services(800) 499-1748

www.fourcounty.com

The internet is a great source for everything these days, from ordering online to researching. However, expanding internet gambling poses one of the most profound challenges in the re-sponsible gambling and prob-lem gambling fields. Technolo-gy has revolutionized gambling participation, regulation and

operation. It also provides both new threats and new opportuni-ties for problem gambling ad-vocates.While most people gamble re-sponsibly, some fail to control their level of playing and are unable to stop or fail to set reasonable limits. Gambling behavior ranges from no gam-bling to social gambling to

problem and pathological gam-bling. Problem and pathologi-cal gambling have a number of negative personal, familial, so-cial, economic and health con-sequences.During Problem Gambling Awareness Month in March and all year long, the National Council on Problem Gambling

(NCPG) and Four County Mental Health Center aim to raise aware-ness about problem gam-bling.With more gaming choic-es than ever, Kansans today

are gambling in record num-bers. Many players are able to play within their limits, but some lose control. What starts out as fun and ex-citing can lead to dangerous consequences. There are a num-ber of different reasons people become problem gamblers. Compulsive gambling victims find ways to gamble regardless

MissionFour County Mental Health Center is dedicated to providing accessible, innovative services in partnership with individuals, families and our communities.

VisionWe envision healthier communities as we help individuals and families improve their lives. Collaborating with community partners, we sustain a robust range of services that are accessible because we help people where they live and work.

We continue to be innovative as we identify new and special needs, develop programs, train our staff, and deliver services. We will expand our use of state-of-the-art technology to extend our capacity and enhance the quality of service. We will continue to develop well-trained, dedicated staff within a supportive, challenging, and personally rewarding work environment.

Eating disorders are complex mental disorders. They are seri-ous and can be life-threatening. Eating disorders are not just a phase, trend, or lifestyle choice. They can harm physical health, mood, social ties, and function-ing in daily life.Eating disorders involve prob-lematic behaviors with an emotional basis. The person has excessive fear and anxiety about eating, body image, and weight gain. This leads them to do things that can have serious health effects. A person with an eating disorder needs spe-cialized care. With early treat-ment, the person is more likely to recover.

Eating disorders can be pre-vented. They arise from a vari-ety of physical, emotional, so-cial, and familial issues, all of which need to be addressed for effective prevention and treat-ment.Early treatment is vital. As eating disorders become more en-trenched, the dam-age is less revers-ible. Usually the family is asked to help in the treat-ment. While eating dis-orders are seri-ous, potentially life threatening illness-

es, there is help available and recovery is possible. If you or someone you know show signs of eating disorders, see your lo-cal mental health center or call 1-800-662-HELP(4357).

• Four County Mental HealthCenterIsHereForYou

•Children Deserve Toxin-FreeParents

•StaffAnniversaries

•HealthyMindsAreImportant

•AlcoholFreeWeekend

•ParentPower

• Social Workers Help CreateBetterTomorrows

•MarkYourCalendars

• Easier Gambling AccessPosesProblems

•EatingDisorderAreIllnesses,NotLifestyleChoices

Volume 8: Issue 1 - 2018

Eating Disorders Are Illnesses,Not Lifestyle Choices

Easier Gambling Access Poses Problemsof any laws restricting gaming options. When hope is gone, the game is no longer about the thrill of winning, but instead about chasing the loss.Problem gamblers jeopardize everything important in their lives – including their family, friends, job and finances. Dras-tic measures like stealing are considered, or even worse, sui-cide.Treatment is available to prob-lem gamblers, family members, and concerned others who are impacted by a loved one strug-gling with problem gambling.Confidential, no cost assistance may be made by calling Four County Mental Health Center at (620) 331-1748 or the Kan-sas Problem Gambling Helpline at (800) 522-4700.

Love Yourself to Achieve Happiness and Self-Worth

The truth is that happinessand self-esteem come fromloving yourself for whoyou truly are.

Page 2: Mental Health Matters - Four County

StaffAnniversaries

anyone can give up,it’s the easiest thing in the world to do. But to HOLD It tOGetHer when everyone else would understand if you fell apart, that’s trUe strenGtH. DOn’t GIVe UP, the BeGInnInG is always the HarDest.

Congratulations to Four County staff on these milestone anniversaries. Thank you for your commitment to Four County and the patients we serve.

Mark YourCalendars

February1-7 - Patient Recognition Week

4-10 - Eating Disorders AwarenessWeek

11-17 - Children of Alcoholics Week

30 - Doctor’s Day

MarchProblem Gambling Awareness

Social Work Month3/30-4/1 - Alcohol Free Weekend

30 - Doctor’s DayGood Friday (holiday)

AprilAlcohol Awareness MonthAutism Awareness MonthCelebrate Diversity Month

Child Abuse Awareness MonthEmotional Overeating Awareness

MonthSexual Assault Awareness Month

Stress Awareness Month1-7 - Child Abuse/Blue Ribbon

Week8-14 - National Crime Victims’

Rights Week24-30 - Administrative

Professionals Week1 - Easter (holiday)

5 - Autism Day16 - Stress Awareness Day

18 - Adult Autism Day22 - Earth Day

25 - Administrative Professionals Day/Secretary’s Day

Social Workers Help Create Better TomorrowsSocial workers are people who are trained personnel with the aim of alleviating the conditions of those in need of help. They are present throughout our society, including the government, schools, universities, social service agencies, communities, the military, and in health care and mental health organizations.

Our mental health social workers focus their efforts on a specific area to gain a greater understanding and become better equipped to assist individuals with chronic illnesses.Social workers are dedicated to enhancing the well-being of others and meeting the basic needs of all people,

especially the most vulnerable in our society. They have brought about major positive social changes, improved the lives of individuals and families, and will continue to do so in the future.In celebration of National Social Work Month in March, we ask you to thank a social worker.

Imagine coming home from school and dreading what you might find. Imagine having no friends because you’re too embarrassed to bring them home in case Mom or Dad are drunk, or worse. Imagine living in a home full of fear and having no one to turn to because everyone denies there’s a problem.People that get hurt the most by al-cohol and drugs don’t even use them - they are the children of addicted parents. These vulnerable children should not have to grow up in isola-tion or without support.

Alcohol and other drug dependen-cies affect around 43% of American families and severely disrupt family life. Children’s physical, emotional, and intellectual development are compromised when they live with an addicted family member. Often these children have difficulties in school and other areas of life.Addictions run in families, and can harm future generations. Children in families with alcohol and other drug dependencies are more likely to develop alcoholism or drug depen-dencies themselves. They have more physical and mental health problems than other children. Families affected by addictions incur higher health care costs and are vul-nerable to violence and child abuse. Alcoholism and drug addiction are not signs of weakness. Fortunately, there are treatments that help people

to counteract addiction’s powerful disruptive effects and regain control.If you suspect alcohol or other drug dependencies run in your family or in a friend’s family, please seek pro-fessional help soon. Together we can increase awareness of this hidden problem and the support available.

Children need to remember:• They did not cause it• They can not control it• They can not cure it• They can help take care of them-

selves by communicating their feelings, making health choices and celebrating themselves

Children Deserve Toxin-Free Parents A child’s first and most influential teacher is their parent. Parents need to lead their children to be the best they can be. Parents can communicate to their children the im-portance of learning from others and mak-ing the right choices. Parents are the earliest and most influential on a child. Their examples profoundly affect the kind of leaders they may become. Lead-ership needs to be modeled by the parents. Take time to know your child. Working with a child’s personality, a parent needs to learn to develop that child’s individual traits and abilities and sometimes temper strengths that left unchecked would become a liability. For example, an assertive, outgo-ing personality is a great trait in a leader, but without self-control it may be seen as aggressive and controlling. Take the time to point out where they can learn from the example of others. Use ex-amples and outcomes of decisions of both right and wrong approaches to situations. Teach them cause and effect. Choices have consequences. Take the time to understand what problems and issues your child is dealing with and then guide them to the right decisions by applying the right principles. By instilling principles rather than pat answers to prob-lems, you will give them tools to work with that they can apply over and over again in their life. Take the time to praise them when they make the right choices and gently show them the choice they missed when they go astray. Give them age appropriate respon-sibilities and let them stand or fall on their choices. Self-esteem comes from knowing you did or are doing the right thing and should be praised. Take the time to involve them in family ac-tivities and work. This will help them learn teamwork (sharing and considering others) and a good work ethic. All parents want their children to be happy but there are times when a child’s behavior

can signal a problem to be addressed. Often this will become noticeable when their behavior is different from past behaviors. These chang-es may be gradual or they may occur sud-denly. Either way they are a sign that your child needs help and understanding.Your child’s emotional health is as impor-tant as his physical health. By developing the body, mind and spirit of the growing child their health needs may not become health problems in adulthood. Positive men-tal health develops when children and young people enjoy play and leisure activities, be-ing with others in the family, being with friends and other young people of their age. Everyone feels sad, angry, afraid or upset at times; especially when things have gone very wrong for them. Children usually will respond these feelings in the same way they witness their parents responding. Be aware of how you respond to your own feelings be-cause your child does and learns from you. The support and understanding they have from people around them is extremely im-portant in helping a child cope with prob-lems. As a parent it is important to stay in touch with your child, be aware of and at-tend to any changes in your child’s feelings or be-haviors. Encourage your child to talk about what is happening in his life, and also model appropriate behavior in your own re-lationship with others.A Parent Education Program is available to help strengthen the mental and physi-cal wellness of both the participants and the children they affect. Classes are available on parenting skills and fresh ap-proaches to dis-cipline, health and safety tech-niques used in nurturing chil-dren.Four County is here for you.

Parent Power

Parenting Classeswww.fourcounty.com

to view a list of upcoming classes.

neVer be DefIneDby your past. It was a lesson

noT a life senTence.20 Years of ServiceVirginia King15 Years of ServiceTeresa BurgessJennifer ForakerBlair Millemon10 Years of ServiceDeborah BookEdward GodinezAshley HorickJewel HuntNancy KyleMichelle NewtonKaren SchrollDavid VanWinkle

5 Years of ServiceFord HallBetty FulkersonKimberly JimenezVerna Woolsey

Page 3: Mental Health Matters - Four County

Volume 8: Issue 1 - 2018

Healthy Minds Are ImportantA healthy mind is as important as a healthy body. Good mental health can help you enjoy life more; handle difficult situation; stay better connected to your family, your friends, and your community; and keep your body strong.The link between mental and physical health is often called a mind-body connection. Caring for one’s mind, as well as one’s body, is good for overall health, and a key to success at home, work, at school or at play. A useful way to think about mental health is a definition used by the World Health Organization: “Mental health is a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.” Individuals who have good mental health are well-adjusted to society, are able to relate well to others, and basically feel satisfied with themselves and their role in society.Definitions of mental health are personal and are dependent upon individual life experience and life context. Therefore, they can be influenced by gender, race, religious beliefs, social class, experiences of family life, aspirations and beliefs, etc.Mental health can be socially constructed and socially defined; different communities, professions, societies and cultures have very different ways of viewing the nature and causes. Good mental health is not universally the same for all people.Just as we monitor our bodies for potential problems or pain, we need to be aware of our mental health and recognize when it needs some attention.When we have good mental health, we’re in a place of peace and balance with our social, emotional and psychological states. We have found a life that fits our needs for social connections with others. We deal with tragedy and happiness in our lives, and authentically experience all the emotions open to us.Being in good mental health doesn’t mean that you’ll never feel sad, lonely, or “down.” But when these feelings disrupt your life or go on too long, there may be a bigger problem.Unusual feelings of sadness or depression can happen when you have to move from your home; people you love get sick or die; you have to depend on others around, or even to do the simple things you used to do yourself; or physical health problems seem overwhelming.

In addition to feelings of depression, some of the following changes in behavior may suggest other emotional problems:• Being easily upset• Not having the energy to do the things you want to do, or

used to do• Changing sleep habits• Increasing forgetfulness• Being afraid of things• Changes in eating habits• Neglecting housework• Crying a lot• Having trouble managing money• Believing that you can’t do anything worthwhile• Being confused• Getting lost a lot• Staying alone a lot of the time• Spending little or no time with friends• Feeling hopeless or overwhelmed• Thinking life isn’t worth living• Thinking about hurting yourself

Here are some things you can do if depression or other changes in your behavior last longer than two weeks:• Talk with your doctor or other health care professional. Tell

them exactly how you’re feeling, and let them know how this is different from the way you used to feel. They can check for any problems you may be having, and can discuss treatment options with you.

• Share your feelings with a friend, family member or spiritual advisor. These people can sometimes notice changes that you might not see.

• Ask for advice from a staff member at a program you participate in.

• Call for information from your local mental health center.• Check for local organizations that can help.

Contact Your Local Mental Health CenterFour County Mental Health Center

(800) 499-1748

Mental Health M a t t e r s Insert

A person with good mentAl heAlth is Able to cope with and Adjust to recurrent stresses of eVerydAy lIVIng in an AcceptAble wAy.

hAppIness does not come from what you have

but whAt you Are.

*Excerpts from Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Page 4: Mental Health Matters - Four County

Alcohol Free WeekendMental Health M a t t e r s Insert Volume 8: Issue 1 - 2018

SeekProfessional

Help

Underage drinking and excessive drinking have negative effects on our community. It compromises students’ education, the safety of everyone, the quality of life of our community, and one’s reputation. The highest rates of excessive alcohol use occur among a growing population of 18-22 year olds who are full-time college students. A number of conditions - including development, social, and environmental factors - contribute to college students’ alcohol use and other risky behaviors.Among the 18-22 year old college-age group, three in five full-time students (58 percent) reported current alcohol use in 2015, and one-third (37.9 percent) reported binge drinking. Binge drinking is when a man consumes five or more drinks on the same occasion and a woman consumes four or more drinks on the same occasion. One in 8 full-time college students (12.5 percent) in 2015 was a heavy drinker (binge drinking on five or more days in a month). In 2015, male students were more likely than female students to engage heavy drinking. Males and females had similar rates for current drinking and binge drinking. Another national survey found male full-time college students more likely than female students to report heavy drinking in the past 30 days (37 percent versus 29 percent).College males have consistently had considerably higher rates of binge drinking and daily drinking than college females. But since about 2004 the gender gap has been narrowing, with an overall increase in daily drinking by college females and an overall decrease among college males. Since 2007, binge drinking has declined among both genders and a fairly constant gap remains in their rates.The list of the harmful effects of excessive alcohol use among college students, including large numbers of underage drinkers, is long, and includes death for more than 1,800 young people between the ages of 18 and 24. Nearly 600,000 students in a given year are injured while under the influence of alcohol and upwards of 700,000 are assaulted by other students who have been drinking. Sexual abuse, unsafe sex, academic problems, health problems (including suicide attempts), alcohol-impaired driving, vandalism, property damage, and police involvement - all fueled by alcohol misuse and underage drinking among students - take an enormous annual toll. Alcohol misuse can also lead to alcohol dependence. Thirty-one percent of college students meet criteria for alcohol misuse, with six percent of these individuals diagnosed as alcohol dependent.College students often use alcohol to facilitate social activities, with heavier drinkers expecting more positive effects. Expected effects may include reduced inhibition, acceptance, sex, and sensation. Among female students, explicit reasons for drinking include getting drunk, getting along on dates, feeling good, and forgetting disappointments. Among males, drinking to get drunk stands alone as a prime motive for drinking.

Perceived norms - views of what is common and acceptable - also have a role in college drinking. Many students believe that alcohol and other substance use among peers is greater than it really is and that other students’ use is greater than their own. Permissive alcohol norms are linked to increased use, although the effect appears to be greatest when students already have liberal attitudes toward drinking.In addition to the freedom felt by students no longer bound by parental supervision, college culture often promotes excessive drinking as a mainstay of social life. Fraternities, sororities, and athletic groups may be settings for extreme partying. In addition, alcohol may be readily available through bars, clubs, and stores, and may be promoted through low prices and promotional events. Research has shown that college students are more likely to engage in binge drinking when they are exposed to “wet” environments, where alcohol is prominent and easily accessible.Some common traits that make alcohol availability easily accessible are a high density of alcohol outlets in a geographic area or per unit of population and a high percentage of shelf space devoted to alcohol products. Another excess in retail availability involves promotions - such as drinking contests and discounted drink specials - which encourage overconsumption. The prominence of alcohol at school campus events such as homecoming weekends, often including parents and other alumni, is a form of disproportionate public and social availability. Private parties with alcohol use as a focal point are perhaps the most common form of the excess that defines alcohol availability in the social scene.The social availability of alcohol among college students is facilitated by abundant free time. Research shows that full-time college students spend 27 hours per week on academic activity. These commitments may be further reduced by school and instructor policies that provide latitude in class attendance. Class schedules that allow students to sleep late or to have long weekends facilitate alcohol-heavy socializing. In turn, high-risk drinking negatively affects class attendance, time spent studying, and academic performance.

*Excerpts from Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

lIfe is short. eXperIence it all. lIVe it sober.

Page 5: Mental Health Matters - Four County

StaffAnniversaries

anyone can give up,it’s the easiest thing in the world to do. But to HOLD It tOGetHer when everyone else would understand if you fell apart, that’s trUe strenGtH. DOn’t GIVe UP, the BeGInnInG is always the HarDest.

Congratulations to Four County staff on these milestone anniversaries. Thank you for your commitment to Four County and the patients we serve.

Mark YourCalendars

February1-7 - Patient Recognition Week

4-10 - Eating Disorders AwarenessWeek

11-17 - Children of Alcoholics Week

30 - Doctor’s Day

MarchProblem Gambling Awareness

Social Work Month3/30-4/1 - Alcohol Free Weekend

30 - Doctor’s DayGood Friday (holiday)

AprilAlcohol Awareness MonthAutism Awareness MonthCelebrate Diversity Month

Child Abuse Awareness MonthEmotional Overeating Awareness

MonthSexual Assault Awareness Month

Stress Awareness Month1-7 - Child Abuse/Blue Ribbon

Week8-14 - National Crime Victims’

Rights Week24-30 - Administrative

Professionals Week1 - Easter (holiday)

5 - Autism Day16 - Stress Awareness Day

18 - Adult Autism Day22 - Earth Day

25 - Administrative Professionals Day/Secretary’s Day

Social Workers Help Create Better TomorrowsSocial workers are people who are trained personnel with the aim of alleviating the conditions of those in need of help. They are present throughout our society, including the government, schools, universities, social service agencies, communities, the military, and in health care and mental health organizations.

Our mental health social workers focus their efforts on a specific area to gain a greater understanding and become better equipped to assist individuals with chronic illnesses.Social workers are dedicated to enhancing the well-being of others and meeting the basic needs of all people,

especially the most vulnerable in our society. They have brought about major positive social changes, improved the lives of individuals and families, and will continue to do so in the future.In celebration of National Social Work Month in March, we ask you to thank a social worker.

Imagine coming home from school and dreading what you might find. Imagine having no friends because you’re too embarrassed to bring them home in case Mom or Dad are drunk, or worse. Imagine living in a home full of fear and having no one to turn to because everyone denies there’s a problem.People that get hurt the most by al-cohol and drugs don’t even use them - they are the children of addicted parents. These vulnerable children should not have to grow up in isola-tion or without support.

Alcohol and other drug dependen-cies affect around 43% of American families and severely disrupt family life. Children’s physical, emotional, and intellectual development are compromised when they live with an addicted family member. Often these children have difficulties in school and other areas of life.Addictions run in families, and can harm future generations. Children in families with alcohol and other drug dependencies are more likely to develop alcoholism or drug depen-dencies themselves. They have more physical and mental health problems than other children. Families affected by addictions incur higher health care costs and are vul-nerable to violence and child abuse. Alcoholism and drug addiction are not signs of weakness. Fortunately, there are treatments that help people

to counteract addiction’s powerful disruptive effects and regain control.If you suspect alcohol or other drug dependencies run in your family or in a friend’s family, please seek pro-fessional help soon. Together we can increase awareness of this hidden problem and the support available.

Children need to remember:• They did not cause it• They can not control it• They can not cure it• They can help take care of them-

selves by communicating their feelings, making health choices and celebrating themselves

Children Deserve Toxin-Free Parents A child’s first and most influential teacher is their parent. Parents need to lead their children to be the best they can be. Parents can communicate to their children the im-portance of learning from others and mak-ing the right choices. Parents are the earliest and most influential on a child. Their examples profoundly affect the kind of leaders they may become. Lead-ership needs to be modeled by the parents. Take time to know your child. Working with a child’s personality, a parent needs to learn to develop that child’s individual traits and abilities and sometimes temper strengths that left unchecked would become a liability. For example, an assertive, outgo-ing personality is a great trait in a leader, but without self-control it may be seen as aggressive and controlling. Take the time to point out where they can learn from the example of others. Use ex-amples and outcomes of decisions of both right and wrong approaches to situations. Teach them cause and effect. Choices have consequences. Take the time to understand what problems and issues your child is dealing with and then guide them to the right decisions by applying the right principles. By instilling principles rather than pat answers to prob-lems, you will give them tools to work with that they can apply over and over again in their life. Take the time to praise them when they make the right choices and gently show them the choice they missed when they go astray. Give them age appropriate respon-sibilities and let them stand or fall on their choices. Self-esteem comes from knowing you did or are doing the right thing and should be praised. Take the time to involve them in family ac-tivities and work. This will help them learn teamwork (sharing and considering others) and a good work ethic. All parents want their children to be happy but there are times when a child’s behavior

can signal a problem to be addressed. Often this will become noticeable when their behavior is different from past behaviors. These chang-es may be gradual or they may occur sud-denly. Either way they are a sign that your child needs help and understanding.Your child’s emotional health is as impor-tant as his physical health. By developing the body, mind and spirit of the growing child their health needs may not become health problems in adulthood. Positive men-tal health develops when children and young people enjoy play and leisure activities, be-ing with others in the family, being with friends and other young people of their age. Everyone feels sad, angry, afraid or upset at times; especially when things have gone very wrong for them. Children usually will respond these feelings in the same way they witness their parents responding. Be aware of how you respond to your own feelings be-cause your child does and learns from you. The support and understanding they have from people around them is extremely im-portant in helping a child cope with prob-lems. As a parent it is important to stay in touch with your child, be aware of and at-tend to any changes in your child’s feelings or be-haviors. Encourage your child to talk about what is happening in his life, and also model appropriate behavior in your own re-lationship with others.A Parent Education Program is available to help strengthen the mental and physi-cal wellness of both the participants and the children they affect. Classes are available on parenting skills and fresh ap-proaches to dis-cipline, health and safety tech-niques used in nurturing chil-dren.Four County is here for you.

Parent Power

Parenting Classeswww.fourcounty.com

to view a list of upcoming classes.

neVer be DefIneDby your past. It was a lesson

noT a life senTence.20 Years of ServiceVirginia King15 Years of ServiceTeresa BurgessJennifer ForakerBlair Millemon10 Years of ServiceDeborah BookEdward GodinezAshley HorickJewel HuntNancy KyleMichelle NewtonKaren SchrollDavid VanWinkle

5 Years of ServiceFord HallBetty FulkersonKimberly JimenezVerna Woolsey

Page 6: Mental Health Matters - Four County

Mental Health Mat t e r s Volume 8: Issue 1 - 2018

Mental health services have adapt-ed over the years in response to the needs of our community and chang-es in the healthcare environment. While procedures, practices, and services change, Four County’s com-mitment to their values and mission have not wavered.Clinical Services in many ways serves as a “hub” to the agency pro-viding core services for the commu-nity and connecting individuals with other departments within the agency. Outpatient assessments and counsel-ing therapy sessions provide the in-formation necessary for referral for medication management, specialized services for children or adults, treat-ment for substance disorders or cri-sis intervention.Four County offers same-day admis-sion appointments, evening hours

for clinical services, and 24-hour crisis response services to meet indi-viduals and families in their time of need. Our clinical providers receive evidenced-based trainings focused on client engagement, risk assessment, and treatment of individuals with co-occurring mental health and sub-stance disorders.It is essential for our departments to engage individuals and families at-risk and work with our community partnerships such as law enforce-ment, hospitals, court systems, so-cial services, and other healthcare providers. Together they provide the needed support for patients to re-main in their home and community during their recovery from a behav-ioral health condition. Mental health, substance abuse, and primary care have integrated in order

for individuals and families to achieve both emotional and physical wellness. The goal is to have reduced utilization of inpatient care without compro-mising the safety of people. Out-comes are tracked

and monitored with evidenced-based practices and increased emphasis on crisis care to provide meaningful measures for future levels of care. The link between mental and physi-cal health is often called a mind-body connection. Caring for one’s mind, as well as one’s body, is good for overall health, and a key to suc-cess at home, work, at school or at play. Just as we monitor our bod-ies for potential problems or pain, we need to be aware of our mental health and recognize when it needs some attention.

Four County Mental Health Center Is Here For You

DOn’t start your day with thebroken pieces ofyesterDay. Mental Health

Mat t e r s

Serving Chautauqua, Cowley, Elk, Montgomery and Wilson County

Independence(620) 331-1748

Coffeyville(620) 251-8180

Cowley(620) 221-9664 or

(620) 442-4540

Emergency Services(800) 499-1748

www.fourcounty.com

The internet is a great source for everything these days, from ordering online to researching. However, expanding internet gambling poses one of the most profound challenges in the re-sponsible gambling and prob-lem gambling fields. Technolo-gy has revolutionized gambling participation, regulation and

operation. It also provides both new threats and new opportuni-ties for problem gambling ad-vocates.While most people gamble re-sponsibly, some fail to control their level of playing and are unable to stop or fail to set reasonable limits. Gambling behavior ranges from no gam-bling to social gambling to

problem and pathological gam-bling. Problem and pathologi-cal gambling have a number of negative personal, familial, so-cial, economic and health con-sequences.During Problem Gambling Awareness Month in March and all year long, the National Council on Problem Gambling

(NCPG) and Four County Mental Health Center aim to raise aware-ness about problem gam-bling.With more gaming choic-es than ever, Kansans today

are gambling in record num-bers. Many players are able to play within their limits, but some lose control. What starts out as fun and ex-citing can lead to dangerous consequences. There are a num-ber of different reasons people become problem gamblers. Compulsive gambling victims find ways to gamble regardless

MissionFour County Mental Health Center is dedicated to providing accessible, innovative services in partnership with individuals, families and our communities.

VisionWe envision healthier communities as we help individuals and families improve their lives. Collaborating with community partners, we sustain a robust range of services that are accessible because we help people where they live and work.

We continue to be innovative as we identify new and special needs, develop programs, train our staff, and deliver services. We will expand our use of state-of-the-art technology to extend our capacity and enhance the quality of service. We will continue to develop well-trained, dedicated staff within a supportive, challenging, and personally rewarding work environment.

Eating disorders are complex mental disorders. They are seri-ous and can be life-threatening. Eating disorders are not just a phase, trend, or lifestyle choice. They can harm physical health, mood, social ties, and function-ing in daily life.Eating disorders involve prob-lematic behaviors with an emotional basis. The person has excessive fear and anxiety about eating, body image, and weight gain. This leads them to do things that can have serious health effects. A person with an eating disorder needs spe-cialized care. With early treat-ment, the person is more likely to recover.

Eating disorders can be pre-vented. They arise from a vari-ety of physical, emotional, so-cial, and familial issues, all of which need to be addressed for effective prevention and treat-ment.Early treatment is vital. As eating disorders become more en-trenched, the dam-age is less revers-ible. Usually the family is asked to help in the treat-ment. While eating dis-orders are seri-ous, potentially life threatening illness-

es, there is help available and recovery is possible. If you or someone you know show signs of eating disorders, see your lo-cal mental health center or call 1-800-662-HELP(4357).

• Four County Mental HealthCenterIsHereForYou

•Children Deserve Toxin-FreeParents

•StaffAnniversaries

•HealthyMindsAreImportant

•AlcoholFreeWeekend

•ParentPower

• Social Workers Help CreateBetterTomorrows

•MarkYourCalendars

• Easier Gambling AccessPosesProblems

•EatingDisorderAreIllnesses,NotLifestyleChoices

Volume 8: Issue 1 - 2018

Eating Disorders Are Illnesses,Not Lifestyle Choices

Easier Gambling Access Poses Problemsof any laws restricting gaming options. When hope is gone, the game is no longer about the thrill of winning, but instead about chasing the loss.Problem gamblers jeopardize everything important in their lives – including their family, friends, job and finances. Dras-tic measures like stealing are considered, or even worse, sui-cide.Treatment is available to prob-lem gamblers, family members, and concerned others who are impacted by a loved one strug-gling with problem gambling.Confidential, no cost assistance may be made by calling Four County Mental Health Center at (620) 331-1748 or the Kan-sas Problem Gambling Helpline at (800) 522-4700.

Love Yourself to Achieve Happiness and Self-Worth

The truth is that happinessand self-esteem come fromloving yourself for whoyou truly are.