Top Banner

Click here to load reader

LSN Government 1st Quarter Learning Module - Government 1st Quarter Learning Module ... Students will analyze the philosophical ideas and historic documents and examine their ... (Complete

Jun 14, 2018

ReportDownload

Documents

tranhanh

  • LSN Government 1st Quarter Learning Module

    Objectives: 1. Students will compare and evaluate how the underlying values and principles of political and economic

    systems are necessary to understanding how all people around the world are impacted by the structure they live within.

    2. Students will analyze the philosophical ideas and historic documents and examine their significance in relation to the formation of American government. Students will examine how such ideas influenced the writing of our Constitution and Bill of Rights.

    MSDE Standards: Indicators: 1.1.1 (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g)(h)(j) (k) Purpose of government, Basic Principles of Government, Founding Documents Indicators: 1.1.2 (c) (d) (e) (f) Construction of the Constitution and Bill of Rights Indicators: 2.2.1 (a) (c) (d) (e) (f) Types of government Indicators: 4.1.2 (a) (b) Never Enough Resources Indicators: 4.1.1 (a) (b) (c) Types of Economic Systems

    Activities for Unit 1: Part 1: Who Rules? Procedures:

    1. Brainstorm (Complete the Mind Map): What kinds of governments exist? What kinds of leaders can be in charge of a country? Think about everything you've ever heard of or learned and add it to this mind map. Circle each idea you add and draw a line to connect it to the main phrase (or to another idea you added). Keep brainstorming until you run out of room or time.

    2. Complete the Background Reading: Who Rules? to gather information about different types of governments. Be sure to Mark the Text as you read!

    3. Next, practice what you learned by completing the Who Rules Worksheet Parts A and B.

    Part 2: Market Economy Procedures:

    1. Begin with the Background Reading: The Market Economy to learn a bit about basic economic concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, supply & demand and types of economic organization. Be sure to fill in the 6 Traits of a Market Economy Note-Taking Guide as you read!

    2. As you read, complete the Note-taking Worksheet: 6 Traits of a Market Economy. 3. Practice applying the concepts covered in the reading by completing the The Market Economy Worksheet

    Parts A-E.

    Part 3: Apply What you Learned Respond to the Constructed Response Item that below on a separate sheet of paper.

    Comparative Government Compare and contrast the characteristics of limited and unlimited governments. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of both types of government. Be sure to use specific examples and details to support your response

    (Hint: Use what you learned from the "Who Rules" activity and use pages 18-21 in your textbook for reference)

  • Activities for Unit 2

    Activity #1: The United States Constitution Procedures:

    1. First, thoroughly examine the United States Constitution (page 775 in your textbook) and the ICivies Constitution Student Reading. Be sure the Mark Up the Text as you read!

    2. Next, read about Constitutional Principles Separation of Powers and Checks & Balances; complete the Cutout Activity as directed.

    3. Finally, complete the Practice Activity. parts A-D.

    Activity #2: You've Got Rights! Procedures:

    1. Begin by thinking about the rights you feel are most important for citizens to have. Complete the You've Got Rights! Anticipation Activity.

    2. Then, read some information about the Bill of Rights as well as the actual text of selected Amendments. Write the number of the rights described in the Pamphlet of Protections in the Anticipation Activity on the line next to the appropriate amendment. (Note: an amendment may match more than one protection from the anticipation activity.)

    3. Go on to complete the Matching and additional Practice Activity, parts A and B.

    Part 3: Apply What you Learned Respond to the Constructed Response Item that below on a separate sheet of paper.

    Read the list of freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. Freedom of religion Freedom of speech Freedom of the press The right to peaceably assemble The right to petition the government

    Citizens of a newly independent country are drafting a constitution. They have requested your help in selecting the two most important rights in the First Amendment to the United States Constitution to include in their constitution.

    Choose two First Amendment rights from the United States Constitution that you think should be included in the new country's constitution.

    Identify your choices and explain why you think they should be included. Include details and examples to support your answer.

  • Mark Up the Text

    1 Number Each Paragraph

    CD Circle key words or details you want to remember. Put a question mark over things

    you find confusing or have

    questions about.

    Put an exclamation mark over

    things you find interesting.

    E Use an E to note Evidence you find in the text. Draw an arrow next to parts you

    make connections to.

    Write important THOUGHTS in the margin.

  • Types of cGovernments

    Leaders

    Types of Governments Ek

    Leaders

    Who Rules?

    Name:

    Types of Governments. What kinds of governments exist? What kinds of leaders can be in charge of a country? Think about everything you've ever heard of or learned and add it to this mind map. Circle each idea you add and draw a line to connect it to the main phrase (or to another idea you added). Keep brainstorming until you run out of room or time.

    r'S Anticipation Activity Mind Map

    Who Rules?

    Name:

    Types of Governments. What kinds of governments exist? What kinds of leaders can be in charge of a country? Think about everything you've ever heard of or learned and add it to this mind map. Circle each idea you add and draw a line to connect it to the main phrase (or to another idea you added). Keep brainstorming until you run out of room or time.

    OV7CS

    Anticipation Activity Mind Map

  • King Harald V of Norway with his wife, Queen Sonja. Norway is a constitutional monarchy. The king is the head of state and has a mainly ceremonial role. The actual government is a democracy.

    Who Rules?

    Name:

    Someone's Got to Be In Charge

    If you compared all the governments in the world, you would find one thing in common: Someone is in charge. The question is, who? There are many different forms of government. Some have one leader who has all the control. Others give power to the people. Here are some forms of government that exist (or have existed) in the world:

    Me, Myself, and I

    An autocracy is a government in which one person has all the power. There are two main types of autocracy: a monarchy and a dictatorship.

    In a monarchy, a king or queen rules the country. The king or queen is known as a monarch. Monarchs usually come to power through their family line: The current king or queen's oldest child becomes the next king or queen. In some monarchies, especially those in historical times, the monarch held all the power and had the final say over the government. In modern times, monarchs usually share power with other parts of government. Often they are also subject to the country's constitution.

    A dictatorship is a form of government where one leader has absolute control over citizens' lives. If there is a constitution, the dictator has control over that, tooso it doesn't mean much. Although other parts of the government may exist, such as courts or a lawmaking body, these branches always do what the dictator wants them to do. They do not represent citizens.

    Power to the People!

    In a democracy, citizens hold the political power. There are two fundamental types of democracies:

    In a representative democracy, citizens elect leaders to represent their rights and interests in government. The elected leaders, or representatives, do the day-to-day work of governing the country: They consider the issues, work to find solutions, pass laws, and do all of the other things necessary to keep a country going. Citizens hold the ultimate power, though, because if they don't like what their representatives are doing, they can vote in new ones!

    In a direct democracy, there are no representatives. Citizens are directly involved in the day-to-day work of governing the country. Citizens might be required to participate in lawmaking or act as judges, for example. The best example of this was in the ancient Greek city-state called Athens. Most modern countries are too large for a direct democracy to work.

    IVF:r.L0,

    A man votes in Peru.

    The Peruvian legislature

    Reading p.1

  • Crown of the Holy Roman Empire, which was tied to the Catholic church and lasted from the 10th-19th centuty.

    From 1962 to 2011, Myanmar (also known as Burma) was ruled by a military junta that was condemned by the world for its human rights violations.

    Representative Democracy

    4 Where would you put theocracy on this chart?

    Who Rules

    1 NONE . ONE

    --, Anarchy

    Direct Democracy

    Dictatorship

    Who Rules?

    Name:

    We, Ourselves, and... urn... Us

    In an oligarchy (OH-Iih-gar-kee), a small group of people has all the power. Oligarchy is a Greek word that means "rule by a few." Sometimes this means that only a certain group has political rights, such as members of one political party, one social class, or one race. For example, in some societies, only noble families who owned land could participate in politics. An oligarchy can also mean that a few people control the country. For example, a junta is a small group of peopleusually military officerswho rule a country after taking it over by force. A junta often operates much like a dictatorship, excep

Welcome message from author
This document is posted to help you gain knowledge. Please leave a comment to let me know what you think about it! Share it to your friends and learn new things together.