Top Banner

Click here to load reader

Learning Support Services. When conditions are “RIGHT” students educate one another and end up knowing more than they would have working alone. 7 Studies:

Dec 26, 2015

ReportDownload

Documents

  • Slide 1
  • Learning Support Services
  • Slide 2
  • Slide 3
  • When conditions are RIGHT students educate one another and end up knowing more than they would have working alone. 7 Studies: Law/TIMSS/House/Bowen/Gillies/Mueller & Fleming/Battistich, Solomon, & Delucchi Higher Levels of Academic Learning & Retention Self-Esteem, Social Skills
  • Slide 4
  • Lions share done by Worker Bees GophersHitchhikers Bickering, Arguing, off task, lack of communication, unproductive
  • Slide 5
  • Design and Guide Effective Groups SMART GROUPS
  • Slide 6
  • Cooperative Groups Will to Cooperate Cooperative Management Skills to Cooperate Four Basic Principles Cooperative Structures
  • Slide 7
  • What is a cooperative group? Strong, positive group identity Four members Endures over time Heterogeneous
  • Slide 8
  • How are groups formed? Variety of methods Friendships or interests Random groups Teacher assigns students to groups Heterogeneous - maximize the probability of peer tutoring and improving cross-race and cross-sex relations
  • Slide 9
  • What is the best way to form groups? Teacher assignment groups Can be held together for a long time Students form a strong group identity Groups learn to learn together
  • Slide 10
  • What are some problems with other methods? Random: The luck of the draw can put four low achievers in the same groups Friends Choose: Classroom management problems, leaving someone out
  • Slide 11
  • How big should groups be? Four members per group Allows pair work Groups of more than four do not lend themselves to enough participation and they are harder to manage
  • Slide 12
  • Three ways in which the will to cooperate is created and maintained: Teambuilding Classbuilding Use of cooperative task and reward structures, including recognition systems
  • Slide 13
  • Teambuilding and Classbuilding Activities for group and classbuilding provide unique learning experiences not afforded by traditional exclusive emphasis on academic content. Found in workplace - should be in classrooms too
  • Slide 14
  • Task and Reward Structures Cooperative Task Structures - A Group Product Grading problems? Improvement Scoring Group Scores as a recognition system, not a report card
  • Slide 15
  • Room Arrangement Quiet Signal Teacher and Student Modeling Manageable Noise Level Efficient Distribution of Materials Class Rules and Procedures
  • Slide 16
  • Developing Social Skills Modeling Defining Role-playing
  • Slide 17
  • Four Basic Principles to Cooperative Learning P ositive Interdependence I ndividual Accountability E qual Participation S imultaneous Interaction
  • Slide 18
  • Distribute Supplies: Materials Monitor from each group distributes materials to group members Discuss Topic: All students discuss views in pairs Form Teams: Students simultaneously look for names on tables Share Answers: All students engage in choral response Receive Help: Students ask a group member and receive immediate help
  • Slide 19
  • Positive Interdependence Weak Forms: The success of each group member is likely to contribute to success of others The success of groups is likely to be facilitated by success of individual members Intermediate Forms: The success of each group member contributes to success of all group members, but a group member could succeed on own The success of a group is facilitated by the success of each member, but cooperative group could succeed without success or contribution of every member
  • Slide 20
  • Positive Interdependence Strong Forms: The success of every group member is not possible without success/contributions of each The success of a group is not possible without success or contribution of each member
  • Slide 21
  • Individual Accountability Students can be made individually accountable by having each student receive a grade on his/her portion of the group project Each student responsible for a unique portion of a group learning product Whatever the form of individual accountability, the contribution of each individual is made known to the group
  • Slide 22
  • Focus Lesson Guided Instruction I Do It We Do It You Do It Together You Do It Alone Student Responsibility Teacher Responsibility Collaborative Learning Independent Tasks
  • Slide 23
  • Slide 24
  • Focus Lesson Guided Instruction Collaborative Learning Independent Tasks Assessment
  • Slide 25
  • Establish Purpose Model Question Provide Resources
  • Slide 26
  • Focus Lesson Guided Instruction I Do It We Do It You Do It Together You Do It Alone Student Responsibility Teacher Responsibility Collaborative Learning Independent Tasks
  • Slide 27
  • 1) Clarify goals 2) Organize cooperative groups and roles 3) Facilitate cooperative group activities 4) Coach and Assess 5) Recognize group & individual efforts
  • Slide 28
  • The 3 instructional goals of cooperative learning are: 1. Academic achievement, 2. Development of social skills 3. Tolerance and acceptance of diversity, and
  • Slide 29
  • Organize materials, learning experiences and small group activities by paying attention to 4 key features: 1. Form heterogeneous groups 2. How students will work together in small groups ( Student Teams, Jigsaw, Group Investigation, Think-Pair- Share) 3. How behavior and results will be recognized or rewarded 4. Realistic time estimate
  • Slide 30
  • Slide 31
  • Slide 32
  • Group recorder Materials collector Reporter Final copy scribe Illustrator Timekeeper Cheerleader/ Facilitator Monitor Messenger
  • Slide 33
  • Help with Transitions Teach Cooperation Task Interdependence Social Skills Sharing Skills Participation Skills Communication Skills Group Skills Team Building Teaching Social and Group Skills
  • Slide 34
  • Test Academic Learning Assess Cooperation Grade Cooperative Learning Recognize Cooperative Effort
  • Slide 35
  • Slide 36
  • Slide 37
  • Slide 38
  • Find ways to highlight group presentations by displaying results prominently in room. Maybe invite guests to hear final reports. Consider summarizing results through newsletters or other forums. Each individual makes some kind of unique contribution highlight those.
  • Slide 39
  • Teacher Tools to Construct Learning
  • Slide 40
  • 1 Focus Strategy: 2 Construction Strategy: 3 Assessment Strategy:
  • Slide 41
  • Agreement Circles Students stand in a large circle, then step to the center in proportion to their agreement with a statement by a student or teacher.
  • Slide 42
  • Blind Sequencing Students sequence all pieces without peeking at the pieces of group members.
  • Slide 43
  • Circle-the Sage Students who know, stand to become sages; group members each gather around a different sage to learn. Students return to groups to compare notes.
  • Slide 44
  • Corners Students pick a corner, write its number, go there, interact with others with same corner choice in a Rally Robin or Timed Pair Share.
  • Slide 45
  • Fan-N-Pick Played with higher-level thinking Q cards. #1 fans, #2 picks, #3 answers, #4 praises. Students then rotate roles.
  • Slide 46
  • Find My Rule The teacher places items in a frame (two boxes, Venn, on a line); students induce the role. Two Box Induction Whats My Line Crack My Venn
  • Slide 47
  • Find Someone Who Students circulate, finding others who can contribute to their worksheet. People Hunt: Students circulate, finding others who match their own characteristics. Fact Bingo: Find someone who played on bingo worksheet.
  • Slide 48
  • Find the Fib Group members try to determine which of three statements is a fib. Fact or Fiction: group members try to determine if a statement is true or false.
  • Slide 49
  • Flashcard Game Flashcards in pairs, with rounds progressing from many to no clues
  • Slide 50
  • Formations Students stand together as a class to form shapes.
  • Slide 51
  • Four S Brainstorming Sultan of Silly, Synergy Guru, Sergeant Support, and the Speed Captain play their roles as they quickly generate many ideas which are recorded by Synergy Guru. Think Pad Brainstorming: No roles. Students generate items on think pad slips, announcing them to teammates and placing them in the center of the table.
  • Slide 52
  • Idea Spinner Spin Captain Shares an Idea or Quizzes a Pal to Summarize, Evaluate, Explain, or Predict.
  • Slide 53
  • Inside/Outside Circle Students in concentric circles rotate to face a partner to answer the teachers questions or those of the partner.
  • Slide 54
  • Jigsaw Problem Solving Each cooperative group member has p