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HUNGARY - Home | ITF HUNGARY Hungary recorded 633 road fatalities in 2018, representing an 8 fatality

Sep 04, 2020

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  • ROAD SAFETY ANNUAL REPORT 2019

    HUNGARY

  • ROAD SAFETY REPORT 2019 | HUNGARY

    © INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT FORUM/OECD 2019 2

    Country Profile

    Population in 2018: 9.8 million

    GDP per capita in 2018: 15 923 USD

    Cost of road crashes: 2.5% of GDP (2017)

    Road network in 2017: 213 300 kilometres

    (urban roads 31%; rural roads 68%; motorways 1%)

    Registered motor vehicles in 2018: 4.4 million (cars 82%; goods vehicles 11%; motorised two- wheelers 4%)

    Speed limits: 50 km/h on urban roads; 90 km/h on rural roads; 130 km/h on motorways (110

    km/h on motor roads)

    Limits on Blood Alcohol Content: 0.0 g/l

    HUNGARY

    Hungary recorded 633 road fatalities in 2018, representing an 8 fatality increase

    compared to 2017. The mortality rate is 6.4 traffic deaths per 100 000 population. Since

    2013, the number of road fatalities has stagnated. Between 2000 and 2013, road deaths

    fell by 51%. Since 2013 – the year with the lowest number of road fatalities on record -

    annual road deaths have increased by 7%. A new road safety action programme for the

    period beyond 2020 is under preparation.

    Trends

    Hungary registered an overall

    increase in the number of road

    deaths in 2018. According to latest

    available data, 633 persons lost their

    lives in traffic crashes in Hungary in

    2018. This represents an 8 person

    increase on 2017. In 2017, 625 road

    deaths were reported, a 3% increase

    on the 607 road deaths recorded in

    2016.

    The longer-term trend for road

    deaths in Hungary has shown

    significant progress. Between 2000 and 2018, the number of annual road fatalities fell by

    48%. However, nearly the entirely of this reduction was achieved between 2000 and

    2013 when recorded road deaths fell by 51%. Since 2013 – the year with the lowest

    number of road fatalities on record - annual road deaths have increased by 7%.

    The number of traffic deaths per 100 000 inhabitants in Hungary has fallen by 48%

    between 2000 and 2018. In 2018, 6.5 traffic deaths per 100 000 inhabitants were

    recorded, compared to 11.7 in 2000. By way of comparison, the average in the European

    Union is 4.9 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants in 2018.

    Hungary recorded 1.4 road fatalities per 10 000 registered vehicles in 2018. This

    represents a decrease of 68% compared to the year 2000, when the rate of deaths to

    registered vehicles stood at 4.4.

  • ROAD SAFETY REPORT 2019 | HUNGARY

    © INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT FORUM/OECD 2019 3

    Figure 1. Road safety, vehicle stock and GDP trends Index 2000 = 100

    Note: registered vehicles do not include mopeds.

    The picture for fatalities by road user groups shows that passenger car occupants

    continue to be the group the most affected by road crashes. In 2018, passenger car

    occupants accounted for the largest share of road deaths with 46% of the total. They

    were followed by pedestrians (26%), cyclists (11%) and motorcyclists (8%).

    The largest decrease in 2018 was registered among cyclists with 12 fewer deaths

    (-14.8%) compared to 2017. They were followed by pedestrians who suffered 7 fewer

    deaths (-4.1%). On the other hand, motorcyclists experienced 7 more road fatalities in

    2018 than in 2017 for an increase of 16.3% year-on-year. Passenger car occupants

    experienced 15 more road deaths (5.5%) in 2018.

    The long-term trend shows that traffic in Hungary has become safer for all road user

    groups. The strongest decline was registered among cyclists who accounted 62% fewer

    road deaths in 2018 than in 2000. Likewise, pedestrians and passenger car occupants

    saw strong reductions over this period of 53% and 42%, respectively.

    The user group that has benefitted least are motorcyclists, who saw the number of crash

    deaths fall by only 4% (2 fewer fatalities) since 2000. Between 2000 and 2017,

    motorcycle registrations in Hungary grew by 89% - nearly double the amount at the start

    of the century. While this growth is significant, it does not wholly explain the stagnation

    in road safety improvements for motorcyclists; more must be done to improve

    motorcycle safety on Hungarian roads. For comparison purposes, passenger car

    registrations increased by 53% over this time period.

  • ROAD SAFETY REPORT 2019 | HUNGARY

    © INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT FORUM/OECD 2019 4

    Figure 2. Road fatalities by road user group in percentage of total, 2018

    Road deaths by age group in 2018 showed some changes compared to 2017.

    Hungarian 15-17 year olds suffered 4 road fatalities in 2018 – half of the death toll for

    this age group in 2017. On the other hand, those between 65 and 74 years of age

    suffered 11 more road deaths (13.1%) in 2018 than the year prior.

    Looking at the longer-term trend, since 2000, the number of road deaths has decreased

    for all groups. The strongest reduction fatalities over this period accrued to the youngest

    Hungarians with each age category less than 25 years of age seeing the number of

    annual road deaths fall by 75% or more since the start of the century. Hungarian 21-24

    year olds also saw significant road safety improvements as road deaths fell by 68%

    between 2000 and 2018.

    Elderly people above 65 years of age recorded heightened road death totals in 2017 and

    2018. After having reached a record low in 2012 with 121, road fatalities among seniors

    have risen dramatically to 181 in 2017 and 186 in 2018. The figure from 2018 is a

    reduction of only 8.4% on the 203 elderly road fatalities in 2000.

    As a result, elderly people above 65 form the group at highest risk in Hungarian road

    traffic. Seniors above 65 suffer road fatalities at a rate of 11.0 per 100 000 persons. The

    mortality rate of young people, traditionally at disproportionately high risk in traffic, is

    below the national average (3.0 road deaths per 100 000 population for 15-17 year-olds

    and 4.0 for the 18-20 age group). The mortality rate is slightly higher than average for

    21-24-year-olds. The relatively low risk for the younger population could be explained by

    intensive road safety education targeted at this group.

  • ROAD SAFETY REPORT 2019 | HUNGARY

    © INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT FORUM/OECD 2019 5

    Figure 3. Road fatality rates by age group, 2000-2018 Deaths per 100 000 population in a given age group

    Figure 4. Road fatality rate by age and road user group, 2018 Fatalities per 100 000 population

    Analysis of fatalities by road type shows that the rural road network continues to claim

    the most victims. In 2018, 53% of deaths occurred on rural roads, 38% on urban roads

    and 7% on motorways. This repartition has remained relatively stable in recent years.

    In 2018, in comparison to 2017, road deaths fell by 5.4% on rural roads whereas the

    number of fatal injuries increased by 3.0% on urban roads and 35.3% on motorways.

    The relative strong increase on motorways could be explained by an increase in traffic.

    Also many injury crashes on the motorway network involved foreign vehicles.

    Since 2000, fatalities on rural roads decreased by 49.2%, in urban areas by 51.9% and

    only 6.1% on motorways.

  • ROAD SAFETY REPORT 2019 | HUNGARY

    © INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT FORUM/OECD 2019 6

    Figure 5. Road fatalities by road type

    Figure 6. Evolution of road deaths by user category, age group and road type,

    2010-2018

    Fatality data are essential to understand road safety issues, but hardly sufficient.

    Information on serious injuries from crashes is also critically important. Yet injury

    data are much more difficult to obtain, validate and - where available - compare. In

    Hungary, 5559 serious injuries were sustained in road traffic crashes in 2018. More

    broadly, 21 999 injuries were recorded as a result of road traffic crashes.

    Economic costs of road crashes

    Traffic crashes represent a significant cost for society. In 2013, it was estimated at

    around EUR 1.88 billion, or 1.8% of GDP. The original estimation was calculated using

    both a “willingness to pay” and a “human capital” approach (Holló et al., 2013). Later the

  • ROAD SAFETY REPORT 2019 | HUNGARY

    © INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT FORUM/OECD 2019 7

    estimation was based on a methodology by McMahon and Dahdah (2008) on calculating

    the statistical value of a road fatality and a person seriously injured. This estimation was

    updated in 2017 based on the methodology developed for the European Safety Cube

    project (Wijnen et al., 2017). Additionally a model has been elaborated for the estimation

    of the statistical value of a person slightly injured. According to this methodology, the

    total cost of road crashes is equivalent to 2.5% of GDP in 2017.

    Table 1. Costs of road crash injuries, 2017

    based on the SafetyCube methodology

    Unit cost [HUF] Total cost

    Fatalities 273.3 million

    Seriously injured persons 66.4 million

    Slightly injured persons 6.0

    Total as % of GDP 2.5%

    Behaviour

    The