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Humanities 1301: Introduction to the Humanities Professor: Linda Graham Office Phone Number: 713 522-3021 (if you call, please speak slowly and distinctly in leaving your message with a phone number that you also leave slowly and distinctly for me to return your call. Let me know what class you are in, as I teach History and Humanities. Thank you.) HUMA 1301 CRN: 72263 Learning Web: http://learning.hccs.edu/faculty/linda.graham Office Hours: Online Sun. 7:30-10 p.m., Mon. 9-11 p.m., Tues-Wed. 7:30-10 p.m., Thurs. 10- 11 p.m. and throughout the day. Please, feel free to contact me concerning any problems that you are experience in our course. Your performance in my class is very important to me. I am available to hear your concerns and to discuss course topics. Feel free to contact me during these hours. You do not need to wait until you receive a poor grade to contact me. CATALOG DESCRIPTION: HUMA 1301 Introduction to Humanities I Course Description: An introduction to the arts and humanities. The course investigates the relationship between individual human lives and works of imagination and thought. Core Curriculum Course Course Semester: Credit: 3 (3 lecture) Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 Must be placed into college-level reading (or take GUST 0342 as a co-requisite) and Be placed into college-level writing (or take ENGL 0310/0349 as a co-requisite). Humanities 1301 may be taken to fulfill the core curriculum requirement for 3 semester hours in Cross/Multicultural Studies. Given the rapid evolution of necessary knowledge and skills and the need to take into account global, national, state, and local cultures, the core curriculum must ensure that students will develop the essential knowledge and skills they need to be successful in college, in a career, in their communities, and in life. Through the Texas Core Curriculum, students will gain a foundation of knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, develop principles of personal and social responsibility for living in a diverse world, and advance intellectual and practical skills that are essential for all learning. Program Learning Outcomes: PSLO 1 Recognize a variety of works in the arts and humanities PSLO 2 Evaluate how those works express individual and human values within a historical and social context PSLO 3 Develop an informed subjective response to works in the arts and humanities PSLO 4 Critique works in the arts and humanities using systematic methods Course Student Learning Outcomes: 1. Describe representative themes and developments in the humanities
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  • Humanities 1301: Introduction to the Humanities Professor: Linda Graham Office Phone Number: 713 522-3021 (if you call, please speak slowly and distinctly in leaving your

    message with a phone number that you also leave slowly and distinctly for me to return your call. Let me

    know what class you are in, as I teach History and Humanities. Thank you.)

    HUMA 1301 CRN: 72263

    Learning Web: http://learning.hccs.edu/faculty/linda.graham Office Hours: Online Sun. 7:30-10 p.m., Mon. 9-11 p.m., Tues-Wed. 7:30-10 p.m., Thurs. 10-11 p.m. and throughout the day. Please, feel free to contact me concerning any problems that you are experience in our course. Your performance in my class is very important to me. I am available to hear your concerns and to discuss course topics. Feel free to contact me during these hours. You do not need to wait until you receive a poor grade to contact me. CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

    HUMA 1301 Introduction to Humanities I

    Course Description: An introduction to the arts and humanities. The course investigates the

    relationship between individual human lives and works of imagination and thought. Core

    Curriculum Course

    Course Semester: Credit: 3 (3 lecture)

    Prerequisites: ENGL 1301

    Must be placed into college-level reading (or take GUST 0342 as a co-requisite) and

    Be placed into college-level writing (or take ENGL 0310/0349 as a co-requisite).

    Humanities 1301 may be taken to fulfill the core curriculum requirement for 3 semester hours in

    Cross/Multicultural Studies.

    Given the rapid evolution of necessary knowledge and skills and the need to take into account

    global, national, state, and local cultures, the core curriculum must ensure that students will

    develop the essential knowledge and skills they need to be successful in college, in a career, in

    their communities, and in life. Through the Texas Core Curriculum, students will gain a

    foundation of knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, develop

    principles of personal and social responsibility for living in a diverse world, and advance

    intellectual and practical skills that are essential for all learning.

    Program Learning Outcomes: PSLO 1 Recognize a variety of works in the arts and humanities

    PSLO 2 Evaluate how those works express individual and human values within a historical and

    social context

    PSLO 3 Develop an informed subjective response to works in the arts and humanities

    PSLO 4 Critique works in the arts and humanities using systematic methods

    Course Student Learning Outcomes: 1. Describe representative themes and developments in the humanities

  • 2. Interpret representative terms, works, figures and artists in philosophy, literature and the visual

    and performing arts

    3. Compare and contrast representative terms, works, figures and artists in philosophy, literature

    and the visual and performing arts

    4. Evaluate cultural creations in the humanities

    Learning Objectives: Describe representative themes and developments in the humanities

    1. Complete and comprehend reading and viewing assignments Develop the ability to make

    aesthetic judgments Express clearly and support convincingly an interpretation or analysis of a literary,

    philosophical, or visual/performing artwork

    Interpret representative terms, works, figures and artists in philosophy, literature and the

    visual and performing arts 1. Participate in small group and/or class discussions in which assigned works are analyzed and

    interpreted. Explain and illustrate stylistic characteristics of artists and writers included in the course

    syllabus

    Compare and contrast representative terms, works, figures and artists in philosophy,

    literature and the visual and performing arts 1. Explore similarities and differences among artists and works studied.

    Evaluate cultural creations in the humanities 1. Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments Integrate knowledge and understanding of the

    interrelationship of the scholarly disciplines.

    From Core Curriculum Proposal: The four Core Objectives of critical thinking skills,

    communication skills, teamwork, and social responsibility, are addressed by this course in a

    variety of ways. For instance students have to analyze a variety of cultural artifacts and events in

    the context of a specific culture and artistic period. Through an Artifact Project related to the

    studied genres, they will be able to demonstrate competencies in the Core Components required.

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

    1. Demonstrate awareness of the scope and variety of works in the arts and humanities. 2. Articulate how these works express the values of the individual and society within an

    historical and social context.

    3. Articulate an informed personal response and critically analyze works in the arts and humanities.

    4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the influence of literature, philosophy, and the arts on cultural experiences.

    5. Demonstrate an awareness of the creative process and why humans create.

    Students focus on the connections between their own lives, ideas and values as expressed in works of

    human imagination and thought. Through inquiry into selected literature, philosophy, as well as the visual

    and performing arts, students will engage in critical thinking, form aesthetic judgments, and develop an

    appreciation of the arts and humanities while learning about their pivotal role in the health and survival of

    any society. Students will attend and respond to museum and gallery exhibitions and performances (live

    theater and film). They will be introduced to readings in several genres from a variety of cultures.

    Students will respond to the work they study in a variety of ways including: interaction with his peers

    through discussions and formal written assignments responses.

  • COURSE GOAL To develop student thinking, seeing, reading, writing, and listening skills and expand student knowledge

    of the human condition, as portrayed in works of the human imagination and intellect.

    TEXTBOOKS Sayre, Henry. The Humanities: Culture, Continuity and Change, Vol. 1, Pearson, Prentice Hall

    Students enrolled in this core curriculum course will complete assignments designed to cultivate

    the following core objectives:

    o Critical Thinking Skills (HUMA 1301 and HUMA 2319)to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information

    o Communication Skills (HUMA 1301 and HUMA 2319)to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual

    communication

    o Personal Responsibility (HUMA 2319)to include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making

    o Teamwork (HUMA 1301)to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal

    o Social Responsibility (HUMA 1301 and HUMA 2319)to include intercultural

    competency, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in

    regional, national, and global communities

    Humanities 1301 helps students attain the following:

    1. Establish broad and multiple perspectives on individuals in relationship to the larger society and world

    in which they live and understand the responsibilities of living in a culturally and ethnically diversified

    world;

    2. Stimulate a capacity to discuss and reflect upon individual, political, economic, and social aspects of

    life in order to understand ways in which to be a responsible member of society;

    3. Develop personal values for ethical behavior;

    4. Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments; and

    5. Integrate knowledge and understanding of the interrelationships of the scholarly disciplines.

    The Core Curriculum Statement:

    The objective of the humanities and visual and performing arts in a core curriculum is to expand

    students knowledge of the human condition and human cultures, especially in relation to behaviors,

    ideas, and values expressed in works of human imagination and thought. Through study in disciplines,

    such as literature and the visual and performing arts, students will engage in critical analysis, form

    aesthetic judgments, and develop an appreciation of the arts and humanities, as fundamental to the health

    and survival of any society. Students should have experiences in both the arts and humanities.

    The objective of the cross/multicultural component of the core curriculum is to introduce students to

    areas of study, which enlarges their knowledge and appreciation of the multicultural and multiracial world

    in which they live.

    HUMANITIES 1301 - WEEKLY CALENDAR

    Important Dates:

    Sept. 21: Classes begin

    Nov. 9: Last Day for students to withdrawal by 4 p.m. HCCS time

  • Nov. 26/27: Thanksgiving Holiday

    Dec. 7 : Final exams

    Dec 14: grades available to students after noon

    WEEK MATERIAL TO BE COVERED 1 Week of Sept. 21-26 Introduction to course: read Chapter 1 Rise of Culture: From Forest to Farm,

    Chapter 2, - Ancient and Near,& Chapter 3, Stability of Ancient Egypt: Flood and Sun,

    2 Week of Sept. 27- Oct. 3 Chapter 4 The Aegean World and the Rise of Greece: Trade War and

    Victory, Chapter 5 The Golden Age of Athens and the Hellenic World, Chapter 6: Rome: Urban Life and

    Imperial Majesty

    3 Week of Oct. 4-10 Chapter 7 Emerging Empires Chapter 11 Centers of Culture

    ***Ocr. 9/10 Essay as described in the syllabus Huma 1301 and at the end of Topic 2.

    4 - Week of Oct. 11-17 Chapter 8: The Flowering of Christianity and Byzantine World

  • *** Oct. 16/17 Exam chpts. 1-4, 7 and 11.

    5 Week of Oct. 18-24 Chapter 9: The Rise and Spread of Islam & Chapter 10 Fiefdom to Monastery

    and the Romanesque Age

    6- Week of Oct. 25-31 Chapter 12 The Gothic Style & Chapter 13 Siena and Florence in the

    Fourteenth Century

    ***Oct. 30/31 Exam chpts. 5-10

    ***Nov. 1/2 Essay as described in the syllabus Huma 1301 and at the end of the Topic 3.

    7 Week of Nov. 1-7 Chapters 14: Florence and the Early Renaissance & Chapter 15: The High

    Renaissance in Rome and Venice

    *** Nov. 6/7 Exam chpts. 10-13

    8 Week of Nov. 8-14 Chapters 16 The Renaissance in the North and Chapter 17 The Reformation

    9 Week of Nov. 15-21 Chapter 18 Encounter and Confrontation and Chapter 19 England in the Tudor

    Age

    10- Week of Nov. 22 -28 Chapter 20 The Early Counter-Reformation and Mannerism

    ***Nov. 22/23 Essay as described in the syllabus Huma 1301 and at the end of the Topic 4.

    11-Week of Nov. 29/30*** Exam chpts. 14-18

    12 Week of Dec. 6/7 Final Exam this is comprehensive, which includes through chapter 20.

    Instructional Methods:

    As an instructor, I want my students to be successful. My responsibility is to provide you with

    knowledge concerning the materials covered in our course, providing the learning opportunities for my

    students through the different course materials, grading your written Book Assignments and monitoring

    the Artists Collection Corner discussions. I will grade your papers and return them with comments on

    them. Through these assignments, you will see how the humanities influence your life throughout the

    world in this online course.

    As a student, your responsibility is to sign into the class on a regular basis, read the textbook, study for

    and take the tests, participate in the discussions and write the three written Assignments based upon your

    understanding of the materials that we cover and you assimilate from our course. To be successful, you

    should turn in assignments on time. You may turn in assignments early; however, late assignments are

    not accepted. You are to answer ALL of the questions or comments under the topic that you pick from

    each of the three written Assignments. I will have comments within your paper to guide you in each

    paper to help you further develop your writing skills as you go through our course. Please, read these

    comments in order to better for your other papers.

    Graded Work:

  • I. Exams: there are several exams that cover the chapters 1-4, 7 and 11, 5-9, 10-13, 14-18 and the comprehensive Final. Please note, you will have chpts. 19 & 20 on the final, which you are not

    tested on prior to taking the final. Multiple-choice tests will be provided in order to identify important

    terms, works, figures, and artists in philosophy, literature, and the visual and performing arts. All exams

    are worth 25% of your final grade. (SLO 1, 2)

    II. Assignments: Essays: What are Assignment Questions? Assignment topics are found within

    the assignment at the end of each unit, which requires the students to answer each and every

    question and comment on the materials within the topic that the student chooses while requiring

    the student to read and think about the material, sometimes in a different way from the text, and

    formulate an answer. Assignment question answers require critical thinking, which means that

    the student may not find the exact answer written in the text. Students should therefore digest the

    text information and formulate an answer supported by what they have read. Again, ALL of the

    questions and statements are to be answered under your topic.

    IMPORTANT: Students are not permitted to copy from any source; copying will result in a 0

    for a grade on the Assignment. HINT: Read the Assignment Questions before you read the text.

    This will help you key in on aspects of the chapters that will aid you in answering the questions.

    Where do I find the Assignment Questions? Click on the buttons at the end of the unit to find

    the assignment to find the questions. When are the assignments and tests due? Consult the

    Course Calendar for due dates. What do I write? Select on assignment question from the

    topics below, as well as at the end of the unit. Write a two to three page essay on the topic in

    MLA format, double spaced, size 11-12 font. Recommended fonts are Times New Roman. Cite

    all sources (from the book or notes) to avoid plagiarism. This is not a research paper. You do

    not need to go beyond the text or the course materials. How do I submit my answers? Submit

    your essays in the following file types (doc., docx., and rtf.) through the assignment function of

    Blackboard. Save your essay as "last name_ # of assignment". For instance, if your last name is

    "Jones" and this is the first assignment, then you'll save your file as "Jones_1". (Please note you

    do not need to save the file with quotation marks.) Will I receive feedback? Yes, and as we review each cultural group, for example from chapter 1 4, 7 and 11, think about a theme from the list

    that is important to that culture. Then, write an essay for each of the different topics/units examining

    the major characteristics of the different cultures that we have studied. You may choose the topics

    you will write about under the assignment pages, but you must answer all of the questions under that

    topic using 12 font, Times New Roman, 1 margins and cite in accordance with MLA or APA

    included a Works Cited page. Upload your essays in the EO classroom as Word files. You are

    required to use evidence from the assigned textbook and assigned lectures, not outside sources. I

    want you to synthesize the materials and discuss them in your writing. This is about your thoughts

    and not about your research. In order to receive a successful grade, students are to use your textbook

    and class materials for references in your paper. Those who do not use evidence from both sources

    will receive a grade less than C. Students who submit their work in any other format will receive a

    zero. Each written Assignment is worth 25% of your final grade, and The Artists Collection Corner can factor into your grade. (SLO1, 3, 4).

    Participation: Participation is required if you want to succeed (i.e., pass): Remember, you have

    something due each week, not everything is for a grade. Points can be added on to your grade

    for quality participation. Grades:

    90-100 A

    80-89 B

    70-79 C

  • 60-69 D

    Under 59 F

    To help you in your writing assignments, HCCS has a writing center to help you. These centers are

    here to help you succeed. Here is more information about the writing centers:

    The Houston Community College Writing Centers provide a student-centered environment where

    professional tutors support student success for all HCC students. The primary goal of the Writing

    Centers is to offer free, convenient, and personalized assistance to help students improve their

    writing at any stage of the writing process required in any courses at HCC. Tutors will also assist

    students with their job application letters, resumes, and scholarship/transfer essays.

    Each session lasts about thirty minutes. Students should bring their professor's assignment/writing

    prompt, any printed rough drafts, their textbooks, and (if necessary) a flash drive.

    Consult Find-A-Tutor at http://ctle3.hccs.edu/alltutoring/index.php?-link=stu for Writing Center

    locations and times.

    At HCC Writing Centers, each tutoring session becomes a learning experience.

    HCC Policy Statements:

    1. ADA: STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES - any student with a documented disability, (i.e. physical,

    learning, psychiatric, visual, hearing, etc.) who needs to arrange reasonable accommodations must contact

    the disability services office at the respective college at the beginning of each semester. Faculty is

    authorized to provide only the accommodations requested by the disability services office. The counselors

    are as follows:

    HCC COLEMAN - HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER Ms. Micah Bell, MA, LPC Tel: 713/ 718-7082; Fax: 713/ 718-7171 micah.bell@hccs.edu 1900 Pressler Street, Houston, TX 77030 HCC CENTRAL Ms. Jette (Yetta) E. Lott, EdS, MA, LPC, CRC, NCC Tel: 713/ 718-6164; Fax: 713/ 718-6179 jette.lott@hccs.edu 1300B Holman St., LHSB 106, Houston, TX 77004 Ms. Senta Eastern, MEd, LPC, NCC Tel: 713/ 718-2548; Fax: 713/ 718-6179 senta.eastern@hccs.edu 1300B Holman St., LHSB 106, Houston, TX 77004 HCC NORTHWEST (Katy Campus) Dr. LaRonda Y. Ashford, EdD, LPC-Intern Tel. 713/ 718-5408; Fax: 713/ 718-5222 laronda.ashford@hccs.edu Katy Campus - Rm 111, 1550 Foxlake Dr., Katy, TX 77084

    http://ctle3.hccs.edu/alltutoring/index.php?-link=stuhttps://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3amicah.bell%40hccs.eduhttps://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3ajette.lott%40hccs.eduhttps://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3asenta.eastern%40hccs.eduhttps://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3alaronda.ashford%40hccs.edu

  • (Spring Branch Campus) Ms. Lisa Parkinson, MEd, LPC, NCC Tel: 713/ 78-5422; Tel: 713/ 718-5667; Fax: 713/ 718-5430 lisa.parkinson@hccs.edu Spring Branch Campus - RC12, 1010 W. Sam Houston Parkway N., Houston, TX 77043 HCC NORTHEAST Ms. Cynthia De los Santos, MA, LMFT Tel: 713/ 718-8322; Fax: 713/ 718-8101 c.delossantosquinone@hccs.edu 555 Community College Dr., Learning Hub, Houston, TX 77013 HCC SOUTHEAST Dr. Estelle J. Sit, EdD, LPC-S Tel: 713/ 718-7144; Fax: 713/ 718-7223 estelle.sit@hccs.edu 6815 Rustic St., Learning Hub, Bldg D, Ste. 113, Houston, TX 77087 HCC SOUTHWEST Dr. Becky Hauri, PhD, Licensed Psychologist Tel: 713/ 718-7909; Fax: 713/ 718-7781 becky.hauri@hccs.edu 5601 West Loop South, Rm C-136, Houston, TX 77081

    2. Academic Dishonesty: includes, but is not limited to, cheating on a test, plagiarism, and collusion.

    Cheating on a test includes: copying from another students test paper; using materials not authorized by

    the person giving the test, collaborating with another student during a test without authorization;

    knowingly using, buying, selling, stealing, transporting, or soliciting in whole or part the content of a test

    that has not been administered; and/or bringing another person to obtain a test that is to be administered.

    Plagiarism means the appropriation of anothers work and the unacknowledged incorporation of that work

    in ones own written work offered for credit. In an essay, it means copying word by word what authors

    have written without giving credit (more than two words per sentence) or quoting.

    Collusion means the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing written work offered for

    credit.

    Possible punishments for academic dishonesty include a grade of O or F, failure in the course, and/or

    recommendation for probation or dismissal from the college system.

    3. Student Attendance: You are expected to attend all assigned lectures (and labs if applicable)

    regularly. You are responsible for materials covered during your absences. Notify your instructor by

    phone or email, but it is your responsibility to contact him/her. Class attendance is checked daily. If you

    are absent more than 6 hrs. without an acceptable excuse, you may be dropped by your instructor.

    Although it is your responsibility to drop the course for nonattendance, the instructor has the authority to

    drop you for excessive absences. If you do not drop, but stop attending, you may receive a grade of F at

    the end of the semester.

    4. HCC Course Withdrawal Policy -

    https://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3alisa.parkinson%40hccs.eduhttps://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3ac.delossantosquinone%40hccs.eduhttps://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3aestelle.sit%40hccs.eduhttps://webmail.hccs.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=vj-02zvcNUGicaLkBpubq3nYO8kWydIIr6Fe5VRe7Ln3ZVf5N823tY3Aefn8r7fDWOyKRDnIgZw.&URL=mailto%3abecky.hauri%40hccs.edu

  • Beginning fall 2007, the State of Texas imposes penalties on students who drop courses excessively.

    Students are limited to no more than SIX total course withdrawals throughout their educational career at a

    Texas public college or university.

    5. Incomplete Policy (example) A student who at the end of the semester has an emergency can obtain an incomplete only when he/she is

    missing only 1 assignment (which could be the final test). An acceptable excuse must be turned in to the

    instructor.

    DE Classes: To help you avoid having to drop/withdraw from any class, contact your DE professor

    regarding your academic performance. You may also want to contact your DE counselor to learn about

    helpful HCC resources (e.g. online tutoring, child care, financial aid, job placement, etc.). HCC has

    instituted an Early Alert process by which your professor may alert you and DE counselors that you

    might fail a class because of excessive absences and/or poor academic performance.

    Students should check HCCs Academic Calendar by Term for drop/withdrawal dates and deadlines.

    If a student decides to drop or withdraw from a class upon careful review of other options, the student can

    drop online prior to the deadline through their HCC Student Service Center:

    https://hccsaweb.hccs.edu:8080/psp/csprd/?cmd=login&languageCd=ENG

    Classes of other duration (mini-term, flex-entry, 8-weeks, etc.) may have different final withdrawal

    deadlines. Please contact the HCC Registrars Office at 713.718.8500 if you need more information.

    INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS: Receiving a W in a course may affect the status of your student Visa.

    Once a W is given for the course, it will not be changed to an F because of the visa consideration. Since

    January 1, 2003, International Students are restricted in the number of distance education courses that

    they may take during each semester. International students must have full-time enrollment status of 12 or

    more semester credit hours, and of these at least 9 semester credit hours must be face-to-face on-campus

    courses. Please contact the International Student Office at 713-718-8521 or email

    int_student_svcs@hccs.edu, if you have any questions about your visa status and other transfer issues.

    Student Course Reinstatement Policy: Students have a responsibility to arrange payment for their

    classes when they register, either through cash, credit card, financial aid, or the installment plan. Faculty

    members have a responsibility to check their class rolls regularly, especially during the early weeks of a

    term, and reconcile the official class roll to ensure that no one is attending class whose name does not

    appear on the rolls. Students who are dropped from their courses for non-payment of tuition and fees, who

    request reinstatement after the official date of record (OE date), can be reinstated by making payment in

    full and paying an additional $75 per course reinstatement fee. A student requesting reinstatement should

    present the registrar with a completed Enrollment Authorization Form with the signature of the instructor,

    the department chair, or the dean, who should verify that the student has been regularly attending class.

    Students who are reinstated are responsible for all course policies and procedures, including attendance

    requirements. A dean may waive the reinstatement fee upon determination that the student was dropped

    because of a college error. The dean should note the nature of the error in a memo to the registrar with the

    appropriate documentation.

    Other Policies: Please check the Student Handbook for other policies This syllabus is meant as a guide and is subject to change at the discretion of the instructor. If there are

    any changes made, the student will be notified in a timely manner.

    For the Culture Book Assignments, you are to pick one of the topics that are given within the assigned

    Book Assignment from the divisions within the course. You are to write about the topic that you choose,

    answering all of the questions under your topic into a paper. Add development into your paper. You are

    to think about your answers and write out your answers into your paper. You are not to be researching

    your answers. You are to think about your answers and write down what you think. These are some of

    the topics you will have during the semester.

    The Rise of Culture

  • 1. What is the significance of the Paleolithic cave paintings?

    2. What are the characteristics of Neolithic Myth? What is the significance of the Zuni

    emergence tale and the Japanese creation myth?

    Ancient and Near

    1.What is the significance of the Code of Hammurabi?

    2.What is the significance of the Epic of Gilgamesh? (Reading 2.3 a,b,c,d,e)

    3. What is the significance of the Hebrew Monotheism?

    Ancient Egypt

    1. How are the themes of balance and resolution of contradictions evidenced in Egyptian

    culture and religion? In your answer make reference to at least three of the following: The

    Hymn to Aten, the Story of Isis and Osiris, the Palette of Narmer pp 78-79, and Figure 3.25

    The Last Judgment of Hunefer).

    2. In what ways does Amenhotep IV transform traditional Egyptian religion and culture? How

    are the arts affected by these changes?

    3. Examine the Giza complex consisting of the three great pyramids and compare this

    arrangement to the temple constructs of Hathshepsut and the Great Temple of Amun and

    Karnak. Explain in detail the reasons behind the choices to place particular features in

    particular places.

    Emerging Empires

    1. What is the significance of Daoism and Confucianism? How do they differ?

    2. How does reading 7.3 from the Analects of Confucius demonstrate the principles of li, jen,

    and te?

    3. Compare and contrast Dao, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucianism.

    Aegean World & Rise of Greece

    1. What is the relationship between the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations?

    2. What role do the Homeric epics play in Greek culture and self identity?

    3. What is arte for the Greeks? Why is it important? How is it exemplified in Greek art and

    literature of the Aegean period?

    4. What were the Greek views on civilization?

    Rise of Greek City-States

    1. What effect does the uncertainty of Greek religion have on the intellectual culture of

    Greece?

    2. How did the polis arise in Greece? What is the significance of the polis?

  • 3. How does democracy develop in Athens?

    4. What is hubris? What does it show us about Greek culture?

    5. What can we learn about Greek culture from the excerpts from Hesiod (Readings 4.3 and

    4.4)?

    Golden Age Athens

    1. What is eudaimonia? What role does it play in the development of the polis during the

    Golden Age of Greece?

    2. What are the fundamental principles of democracy?

    3. Why wont Socrates leave Athens?

    4. What is the significance of Aeschylus Oresteia?

    5. How do the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle constitute a rebuttal of the relativism of

    Protagoras?

    6. What is the relationship between the Parthenon and the Erechtheion?

    Rome

    1. What are the mythological accounts of the founding of Rome?

    2. How does the Augustus of Primaport demonstrate Augustus purported semi-divine status?

    3. What was the role of women in Roman life and culture?

    4. What role did monumental architecture play in Imperial Rome? How was it made possible?

    5. How did Rome maintain the stability of its vast empire?

    6. Explore themes found in the poetry of Virgil and Horace.

    Flowering of Christianity

    1. Describe Roman decadence in the late empire.

    2. Discuss the messianic and apocalyptic character of Pre-Christian Judaism.

    3. Does Christianity constitute a radical break from Judaism (in your answer, reference

    Reading 8.3 from Matthew's gospel)?

    4. What does St. Augustine mean by the "City of God"? (In your answer reference Reading

    8.6a).

    Flowering of Christianity-Byzantium

    1.What is the motivation and significance of iconoclasm?

    2.What is at issue in the iconoclasm controversy?

    3. What is the significance of Procopius' views on Justinians buildings?

  • 4. How did the Byzantine Empire understand works of pagan art?

    Islam

    1. How does the invention and use of paper affect the development of Islamic civilization?

    2. What is the relationship between Judaism and Islam?

    3. Is Islam a tolerant or an intolerant religion? Reference the readings from the Qur'an and the Hadith.

    Fiefdom and Monastery

    1.Describe some of the prominent themes in Beowulf .

    2.What is the significance of the Song of Roland? How does it demonstrate the chivalric code?

    3.Discuss the significance of Hildegard of Bingen's Scivias.

    Fiefdom and Monastery-The Romanesque Tradition

    1. Think about Eleanor of Aquitaine and the prominent role she played in the world

    politically, as Queen of both England and France, and artistically, as the patron of the

    Courts of Love; Compare these roles to any other women, both historically and in the

    present, in terms of these diverse responsibilities.

    2. Why would maps of the period show the entire world circulating around Jerusalem?

    3. What might a pilgrim encounter on a trek and what were the expected rewards of such an

    undertaking?

    4. What are the contrasts in purpose and design between castles and churches?

    The Gothic Style

    1. Assess the influence of Thomas Aquinas on Christian theology and philosophy.

    2. In what ways are the standards of beauty of the era depicted in the Gothic cathedral?

    3. What does the stained glass Jesse Tree image refer to? In what way does this motif reflect

    the general purpose of window decoration in the Gothic cathedral?

    4. Comparing the use of stained class in the cathedrals and why pictures were important

    during this era. Discuss various windows and the images used.

    5. Examine the building and maintenance of a cathedral. What was the impact on the

    community in terms of labor, fundraising, and support for the Church. Discuss the variety of

    craftsmen needed to complete the design and construction.

    Siena and Florence

    1. Analyze the art of Duccio, Martini, Cimabue, and Giotto by focusing on the growth of

    naturalism in their figures and the move away from Byzantine images.

    2. Consider Bocaccio's Decameron and Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales and detail the

    circumstances of their individual creations. Also examine the similarities and differences.

  • 3. When examining Lorenzetti's fresco Allegory of Good Government in Siena's Palazzo

    Pubblico, what aspects of civil life can be identified?

    4. What is significant about Christine de Pizan's contribution to literature and society?

    5. What elements of Cimabue's Madonna Enthroned with Angels and Prophets show his

    Byzantine roots and which elements demonstrate more naturalism?

    6. How does Dante comment on his sense of morality in his Divine Comedy?

    Centers of Culture

    1. Introduce the Tang and Song dynasties of China by examining their central cities, Chang'an

    and Hangzhou.

    2. Examine the ascendance, regression, and merging of Buddhism and Shintoism in Japan.

    3. Describe the talking drums of the African Yoruba and their use in call and response music.

    Compare the drum voices to polyphonic or motet notation in Europe.

    4. By examining Map 11.1, discuss the spread of Buddhism throughout Asia. Consider how

    the religion moved from culture to culture and the way it took on the characteristics of the

    locale.

    5. Compare the grid system of city design in Teotihuacan in Mesoamerica and the Tang

    capital Chang'an in China.

    6. Discuss Mayan culture through an examination of the City of Palenque and the discovery of

    the tomb of Lord Pacal.

    Florence

    1. What does the term sprezzatura mean to Castiglione's Courtier? Can this be related to some

    example in contemporary society?

    2. Compare Leonardo da Vinci and Lorenzo the Magnificent in relation to the term

    "Renaissance Man."

    High Renaissance

    1. Discuss Machiavelli's The Prince in terms of the separation of church and state.

    2. Clarify the Biblical scheme chosen by Michelangelo for the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

    3. Assess Raphael's The School of Athens in terms of Renaissance ideals. Within the fresco,

    identify the elements that characterize the interests of the period.

    4. Citing specific paintings or works of architecture, discuss the way that Popes and Cardinals

    used the arts to emphasize their own power, wealth, and superiority.

    Venetian Renaissance

    1. Compare Lucretia Marinella's views in The Nobility and Excellence of Women to those of

    Laura Cereta.

  • 2 Examine the storyline of Ariosto's Orlando Furioso and identify the elements of chivalry and

    courtly love.

    3 What is mysterious about Giorgione's Tempest and Carpaccios Miracle at the Rialto?

    Renaissance in the North

    1. Discuss the tension between material well-being and spiritual narrative as seen in the

    paintings of Campin, van Eyck, and van der Weyden.

    2. As a conversation piece, identify the various themes and enigmas found in Bosch's Garden of

    Earthly Delights.

    3. What are some of the symbolic elements present in Jan van Eyck's painting Giovanni

    Arnolfini and His Wife Giovanna Cenami ?

    Reformation

    1. Focusing on the Ninety-Five Theses, examine the specific challenges to the Catholic Church

    made by Luther and the way the Church responded.

    2. Examine Montaigne's essay Of Cannibals and identify the aspects of the piece that are

    innovative and depart from more traditional forms of writing.

    3. What is iconoclasm and what impact did this movement have on Reform churches?

    4. Which artist was known for his cycle paintings and why were they popular in Northern

    homes?

    Counter-Reformation

    1. Discuss the notion of the "other" in regard to the conquest of the Aztec and Incan cultures.

    2. Introduce Mannerism by referencing Michelangelo's Last Judgment.

    3. Relate the sense of inventiveness declared by Vasari to the prominence of women artists.

    4. Evaluate the decisions made by the Council of Trent.

    5. How did El Greco combine his early training in icon painting with the Mannerist style?

    The Age of Encounter

    1. Relate the story of the Aztec legend of Huitzilopochtli vs Cortes conquering of the Aztecs.

    2. In terms of the missionary movement in West Africa, explain why the Kongolese were

    attracted to Christianity.

    3. Compare and contrast the northern and southern schools of painting in China.

    4. Examine the reasons why Japan sealed themselves off from foreign influence.

    5. Discuss the dance mask and explain why it represents the center of West African culture.

    6. Discuss Noh drama and its relationship to Zen Buddhist attitudes and beliefs.

    Tudor Age England

    1. Assess the detail work in portraits by Hans Holbein and relate these details to humanism.

    2. Explain the relationship between Henry VIII's desire for a male heir and the Dissolution Act.

    3. Discuss the character of Dr. Faustus from Marlowe's play and relate this character to

    Elizabethan drama in general.

    4. What sort of society is envisioned by Thomas More in Utopia?

  • 5. Analyze Hamlet as a tragedy and as a study of a complex character.

    6. How does Shakespeare use irony in his Sonnet 130?