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Great Expectations TG2 - · PDF filehis sister. He is an honest, good man who stays with his abusive wife because of his love for Pip. • Pip’s boyhood home: In Kent, Mrs. Joe...

Mar 06, 2019

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S E R I E S E D I T O R S :

W. GEIGER ELLIS, ED.D., UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, EMERITUSand

ARTHEA J. S. REED, PH.D., UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, RETIRED

A T E A C H E R S G U I D E T O T H E S I G N E T C L A S S I C S E D I T I O N O F

CHARLES DICKENSS

GREAT EXPECTATIONSBy LAURIE CALVERT

ISBN: 0-451-52993-6

Copyright 2004 by Penguin Group (USA)

For additional teachers manuals, catalogs, or descriptive brochures, please email [email protected] or write to:

PENGUIN GROUP (USA) INC.Academic Marketing Department375 Hudson StreetNew York, NY 10014-3657www.penguin.com/academic

In Canada, write to:PENGUIN GROUP CANADAAcademic Sales10 Alcorn Avenue, Suite 300Toronto, OntarioCanada M4V 3B2

Printed in the United States of America

A Teachers Guide to the Signet Classics Edition of Charles Dickenss Great Expectations 3

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................................................4II. PLOT AND CHARACTER SUMMARY ........................................................................................4II. STRATEGIES TO USE BEFORE READING ..............................................................................20

Building Background Knowledge................................................................................................20Conduct an Internet scavenger hunt to learn about the author ...................................................20

Play a research game / What the Dickens? ......................................................................20Teach the allusions and unfamiliar terms ....................................................................................21Prereading Journal and Discussion Topics ..................................................................................22Create an anticipation guide ......................................................................................................23Vocabulary: Three Strategies .......................................................................................................24

Use word pictures to teach specific words frequently found on the SAT ............................24Mark vocabulary to assist understanding the text ...............................................................25Enhance decoding skills by teaching students how to interpret dialect...............................25

III. STRATEGIES TO USE DURING READING ...........................................................................26Discussion questions ..................................................................................................................26Chapter review groups ...............................................................................................................34Beyond Journals - Documenting Experiences With the Novel ...................................................35

Use expectation records......................................................................................................35Keep a quotation journal....................................................................................................35Track readers questions......................................................................................................35Sketch complicated settings and scenes to figure them out.................................................36Write one-sentence summaries directly into the book ........................................................36

Teaching Literary Analysis ..........................................................................................................36Examine the effects of figurative language..........................................................................36Analyze Dickenss strange personalities...............................................................................37Evaluate the hooks .............................................................................................................38Get students in the mood ..................................................................................................39See and share the humor ....................................................................................................39Make inferences about theme.............................................................................................40

IV. STRATEGIES TO USE AFTER READING ...............................................................................41Analysis and Extension ...............................................................................................................41

Hold a Paideia seminar ......................................................................................................41Compare the protagonist and the author ...........................................................................41Connect the novel to other literature .................................................................................42Connect the novel to its historical context .........................................................................42Make a recommendation about prison conditions .............................................................42Watch a movie ...................................................................................................................42

Creative Application ..................................................................................................................43Produce an illustrated book review.....................................................................................43Write a new chapter ...........................................................................................................43Create a scrapbook.............................................................................................................43

V. BIBLIOGRAPHY ..........................................................................................................................43Works Cited or Consulted ..........................................................................................................43Useful Internet Sources ...............................................................................................................43

ABOUT THE AUTHOR AND EDITORS........................................................................................45SIGNETCLASSICS.COM ..................................................................................................................46FREE TEACHERS GUIDES .............................................................................................................47

A Teachers Guide to the Signet Classics Edition of Charles Dickenss Great Expectations4

INTRODUCTION

Written almost a century and a half-ago, Great Expectations stands as one of the most enduringnovels ever written. Even readers who have not turned a page of Dickens since senior English willfind themselves caught up in the story of young Pip, a poor blacksmiths apprentice whounexpectedly receives great wealth, education, and training to become a gentleman. When his secretbenefactor turns out to be a convict whom Pip helped as a child, he is forced to reexamine hisfeelings about society, criminality, and what it means to be a gentleman. Along the way, he struggleswith issues of guilt and shame and labors to win the affection of a lady who has no heart. AsDickens spins his timeless tale, even the most cynical readers will find themselves caught up in hismemorable characters, rich humor, intriguing plot twists, precipitous cliffhangers, and universalthemes such as the importance of honor, honesty, and empathy.

Not only is the novel a great read, it is a good tool, useful in honing students reading and analyticalskills and providing a venue for them to discuss and write about issues they care about.Conveniently, Dickens first published the novel serially, building in enough action, suspense, andhumor to keep readers enthralled and buying magazines for more than two years. And todays teensbuy it too. Students instinctively relate to Pipto his embarrassment about his common familyand humble background, to his strong drive to fit in and make something more of his life, and tohis longing for an unrequited, impossible love.

Designed to assist high school teachers to plan and teach the novel, this guide is organized into fiveparts. The first section provides a summary of the chapters and highlights new characters and placesas they are introduced. Section II describes practices teachers may use to build students backgroundknowledge and interest before reading. They include research options, prereading discussion andjournal questions, vocabulary methods, and tips for using an anticipation guide. The third sectiondetails methods to use while students read, including extensive discussion questions, alternatives totraditional journal entries that help students understand the text, and plans to teach literaryanalysis. Finally, strategies to use after reading and a list of resources are provided at the end of theguide. The plans are designed to make this worthwhile novel more accessible to readers and to helpteachers achieve their own great expectations for students.

I. PLOT AND CHARACTER SUMMARY

How to use the Plot and Character Summary. The novel has 59 chapters and is divided into threesections of about twenty chapters each. Besides reminding teachers about key events and characterswithout rereading the novel each year, teachers may copy and distribute the summary to studentsfor review or to help them understand the book as they read. The summary may be used to createquick quizzes or review assignment

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