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FY 2021 | SANDAG Draft Program Budget · PDF file 2020. 5. 20. · DRAFT FY 2021 SANDAG Program Budget (Including the Overall Work Program) May 22, 2020 The Program Budget and Overall

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FY 2021 | SANDAG Draft Program BudgetFY 2021
(Including the Overall Work Program)
May 22, 2020
The Program Budget and Overall Work Program (OWP) are designed to meet the comprehensive planning requirements
of the U.S. Department of Transportation and the
California Department of Transportation.
Some of the research in the OWP is to assist others with data gathering and other information for their individual work
products and studies. Such efforts are supported with funding from other
public or private agencies. Findings and conclusions of those studies are those of the authors and
do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of SANDAG or its Board of Directors.
The Program Budget is available in its entirety at sandag.org/owp.
401 B Street, Suite 800 San Diego, CA 92101-4231 (619) 699-1900
sandag.org
Board of Directors
The 18 cities and county government are SANDAG serving as the forum for regional decision-making. SANDAG builds consensus; plans, engineers, and builds public transit; makes strategic plans; obtains and allocates resources; and provides information on a broad range of topics pertinent to the region’s quality of life.
Chair
Executive Director
Hasan Ikhrata
City of Carlsbad Hon. Cori Schumacher, Councilmember (A) Keith Blackburn, Mayor Pro Tem (A) Hon. Priya Bhat-Patel, Councilmember
City of Chula Vista Hon. Mary Salas, Mayor (A) Hon. Steve Padilla, Councilmember (A) Hon. John McCann, Councilmember
City of Coronado Hon. Richard Bailey, Mayor (A) Hon. Bill Sandke, Councilmember (A) Hon. Mike Donovan, Councilmember
City of Del Mar Hon. Ellie Haviland, Mayor (A) Hon. Dwight Worden, Councilmember (A) Hon. Dave Druker, Councilmember
City of El Cajon Hon. Bill Wells, Mayor (A) Hon. Steve Goble, Deputy Mayor
City of Encinitas Hon. Catherine Blakespear, Mayor (A) Hon. Joe Mosca, Councilmember (A) Hon. Kellie Hinze, Councilmember
City of Escondido Hon. Paul McNamara, Mayor (A) Hon. Olga Diaz, Councilmember (A) Hon. Mike Morasco, Councilmember
City of Imperial Beach Hon. Serge Dedina, Mayor (A) Hon. Mark West, Councilmember (A) Hon. Paloma Aguirre, Councilmember
City of La Mesa Hon. Bill Baber, Councilmember (A) Hon. Kristine Alessio, Councilmember (A) Hon. Akilah Weber, Councilmember
City of Lemon Grove Hon. Racquel Vasquez, Mayor (A) Hon. Jennifer Mendoza, Councilmember (A) Hon. Jerry Jones, Councilmember
City of National City Hon. Alejandra Sotelo-Solis, Mayor (A) Hon. Mona Rios, Councilmember (A) Hon. Ron Morrison, Vice Mayor
City of Oceanside Hon. Jack Feller, Deputy Mayor (A) Hon. Christopher Rodriguez, Councilmember (A) Hon. Ryan Keim, Councilmember
City of Poway Hon. Steve Vaus, Mayor (A) Hon. John Mullin, Councilmember (A) Hon. Caylin Frank, Councilmember
City of San Diego Hon. Kevin Faulconer, Mayor (A) Hon. Mark Kersey, Councilmember (A) Hon. Vivian Moreno, Councilmember Hon. Georgette Gomez, Council President (A) Hon. Monica Montgomery, Councilmember (A) Hon. Barbara Bry, Council President Pro Tem
City of San Marcos Hon. Rebecca Jones, Mayor (A) Hon. Sharon Jenkins, Mayor Pro Tem (A) Hon. Maria Nunez, Councilmember
City of Santee Hon. John Minto, Mayor (A) Hon. Ronn Hall, Councilmember (A) Hon. Rob McNelis, Councilmember
City of Solana Beach Hon. David A. Zito, Councilmember (A) Hon. Jewel Edson, Mayor (A) Hon. Kristi Becker, Councilmember
City of Vista Hon. Judy Ritter, Mayor (A) Hon. Amanda Rigby, Deputy Mayor (A) Hon. Joe Green, Councilmember
County of San Diego Hon. Jim Desmond, Vice Chair (A) Hon. Dianne Jacob, Supervisor Hon. Kristin Gaspar, Supervisor (A) Hon. Greg Cox, Chair (A) Hon. Nathan Fletcher, Supervisor
Advisory Members Imperial County Hon. Jesus Eduardo Escobar, Supervisor (A) Mark Baza, Imperial County Transportation Commission
California Department of Transportation Toks Omishakin, Executive Director (A) Gustavo Dallarda, Acting District 11 Director (A) Ann Fox, Deputy Director
Metropolitan Transit System Hon. Paloma Aguirre (A) Hon. Bill Sandke
North County Transit District Hon. Tony Kranz (A) Hon. Priya Bhat-Patel (A) Hon. Jewel Edson
U.S. Department of Defense Joe Stuyvesant, Navy Region Southwest Executive Director (A) Steve Chung, Navy Region Southwest
Port of San Diego Hon. Garry Bonelli, Commissioner (A) Hon. Dan Malcolm, Commissioner
San Diego County Water Authority Mel Katz, Director (A) Gary Croucher, Vice Chair (A) Vacant
San Diego County Regional Airport Authority April Boling, Chair (A) Paul Robinson
Southern California Tribal Chairmen’s Association Hon. Cody Martinez, Chairman, Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation Hon. Edwin “Thorpe” Romero, Chairman, Barona Band of Mission Indians
Mexico Hon. Carlos González Gutiérrez Cónsul General of Mexico (A) Hon. Mario Figueroa Deputy Cónsul General of Mexico (A) Hon. Natalia Figueroa, Vice Consul
II FY 2021 | SANDAG Program Budget
Abstract
Title:
Author:
Subject:
Date:
(including Overall Work Program)
SANDAG Program Budget and Overall Work Program
May 22, 2020
San Diego, CA 92101
The S ANDAG Program Budget a nd Overall Work Program contain a
description of the SANDAG work program on a project-by-project basis
for FY 2021, as well as other budget components.
This program is primarily financed with federal funds from the Federal
Transit Administration and Federal Highway Administration; state funds
from the California Department of Transportation; and transportation sales
tax and local funds from SANDAG member jurisdictions.
FY 2021 | SANDAG Program Budget III
Acknowledgments
The preparation of this document was accomplished with the collaboration of SANDAG management,
financial staff, project managers, budget coordinators, and administrative support personnel. We express
appreciation to all of the staff members who contributed to the budget process culminating in this
document. SANDAG Executive Staff as of May 22, 2020, includes:
Hasan Ikhrata, Executive Director
Ray Traynor, Chief Planning and Innovation Officer
Laura Coté, Chief Operations Officer
Ray Major, Chief Analytics Officer / Chief Economist
André Douzdjian, Chief Financial Officer
John Kirk, General Counsel
Julie Wiley, Director of Contracts and Grants
José Nuncio, TransNet Program Director
Pat Landrum, Acting Director of Data and Modeling
Coleen Clementson, Director of Regional Planning
Cindy Burke, Director of Research and Program Management
Antoinette Meier, Director of Mobility and Innovation
Elisa Arias, Director of Integrated Transportation Planning
John Haggerty, Director of Engineering and Construction
Ramon Ruelas, Mid-Coast Corridor Director
James Dreisbach-Towle, Director of Business Information and Technology Services
Melissa Coffelt, Director of Organization Effectiveness
Elaine Richardson, Director of Diversity and Equity
Irene McCormack, Director of Strategic Communications
IV FY 2021 | SANDAG Program Budget
Table of Contents
Economic and Funding Outlook ................................................................................................................. 1-10
Local, State, Tribal, and Federal Agency Coordination and Participation..................................................... 1-12
Public Involvement ..................................................................................................................................... 1-12
Chapter 2 Detailed Work Element Descriptions 2-1
2.1 – Modeling and Research ................................................................................................................... 2.1-1
2.2 – Regional Planning ............................................................................................................................ 2.2-1
2.3 – Project Implementation .................................................................................................................... 2.3-1
Chapter 3 OWP Revenue and Expense Summary 3-1
Program Revenues ....................................................................................................................................... 3-2
Program Expenses ....................................................................................................................................... 3-6
Contracted Services ..................................................................................................................................... 3-9
FY 2019-2021 Expenditure Comparison .................................................................................................... 3-16
Chapter 4 Regional Operations and Services 4-1
Detailed Work Element Descriptions ............................................................................................................ 4-2
Program Revenues ..................................................................................................................................... 4-38
Program Expenses ..................................................................................................................................... 4-39
Contracted Services ................................................................................................................................... 4-44
Chapter 5 Pending Discretionary Grants and Projects 5-1
Pending Discretionary Grants ....................................................................................................................... 5-2
Planning Factors .......................................................................................................................................... 6-1
Certifications and Assurances ...................................................................................................................... 6-2
Resolution for Adoption of FY 2021 Program Budget, including the OWP ................................................... 6-9
Chapter 7 Administration and Board Budgets 7-1
Administration Budget ................................................................................................................................. 7-2
Board of Directors Budget Detailed Descriptions .......................................................................................... 7-6
Chapter 8 TransNet Program 8-1
TransNet Extension Flow of Funds – FY 2009 to FY 2048 ............................................................................. 8-2
Program Budget .......................................................................................................................................... 8-3
Senior Services Transportation Grant Program ........................................................................................... 8-11
Active Transportation Grant Program ........................................................................................................ 8-12
Smart Growth Incentive Program ............................................................................................................... 8-13
Environmental Mitigation Program – Land Management Grant Program ................................................... 8-15
Environmental Mitigation Program – Regional Habitat Conservation Fund 12003 and 12013 .................... 8-17
New Major Corridor Transit Operations Program ....................................................................................... 8-19
Chapter 9 Capital Budget 9-1
Capital Budget Funding ............................................................................................................................... 9-4
Capital Program Expenditures ...................................................................................................................... 9-8
9.2 – TCIF/Goods Movement Program ...................................................................................................... 9.2-1
9.3 – Regional Bikeway Program .............................................................................................................. 9.3-1
9.4 – Major Capital Projects ...................................................................................................................... 9.4-1
9.5 – Minor Capital Projects ...................................................................................................................... 9.5-1
9.6 – Projects Pending Closeout ............................................................................................................... 9.6-1
9.7 – Projects Completed Through A Major Milestone .............................................................................. 9.7-1
9.8 – Future Projects ................................................................................................................................. 9.8-1
SANDAG and Criminal Justice Research Division – Member Agency Assessments ...................................... 10-2
ARJIS Member Assessments and Other Revenue Sources ........................................................................... 10-3
ARJIS Ex-Officio Member Assessments (JPA) .............................................................................................. 10-4
VI FY 2021 | SANDAG Program Budget
Chapter 11 Human Resources 11-1
SANDAG Agency Structure ........................................................................................................................ 11-2
Personnel Cost Summary ........................................................................................................................... 11-4
Overall Work Program Fund Reserve .......................................................................................................... 12-2
Motorist Aid Call Box Program Reserve ...................................................................................................... 12-2
SANDAG Administration Reserve ............................................................................................................... 12-2
Automated Regional Justice Information System Reserve ........................................................................... 12-3
I-15 Express Lanes Operations Program Reserve ......................................................................................... 12-3
Capital Program Contingency .................................................................................................................... 12-4
Appendices
Appendix A FY 2021 Overall Work Program – Policy Advisory Committee Involvement ......................... A-1
Appendix B FY 2021 Overall Work Program – Project Justification Table ............................................... B-1
Appendix C Milestones in SANDAG Regional Decision-Making ............................................................. C-1
Appendix D Capital Improvements in the Regional Plan Exceeding $400 Million ................................... D-1
Appendix E Overall Authority, Responsibilities, and Mandates .............................................................. E-1
Appendix F Glossary, Acronyms in the FY 2021 SANDAG Budget ........................................................ F-1
Index a
Chapter 1
Introduction
This budget document reflects FY 2021 priorities for the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG).
SANDAG provides local governments in the San Diego region with a forum to plan and execute projects that
promote economic growth, sustainable communities, and personal mobility. The public agency builds
consensus; makes strategic plans; obtains and allocates resources; plans, engineers, and builds public
transportation projects; and publishes information on a broad range of topics related to the region’s quality
of life. SANDAG is responsible for responding to most state and federal mandates that apply to regions, and
to most locally-generated mandates that must be handled regionally.
More than three million people live in the San Diego region, where a growing economy fueled by
technological innovation, a spectacular coastline and invaluable natural lands, world-class tourist destinations
and educational institutions, and a dynamic international border make it one of the most desirable places in
the country. The region’s residents live in 18 incorporated cities and other communities within the County of
San Diego, an expansive region where efficient mobility is vital to a high quality of life.
This FY 2021 budget reflects early steps of a bold new vision that completely rethinks how people get
around, so that mobility is quicker, more efficient, and more accessible for everyone. Mobility reimagined also
will make our region more environmentally sustainable and place us on a path to meet state mandates for
reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), creating a healthier environment for future generations.
Organizational Structure
The SANDAG Board of Directors, made up of elected officials from the region’s 18 city councils and the
County Board of Supervisors, is the governing body responsible for establishing the agency’s policies and
programs. Directors are elected officials—mayors, city councilmembers, or county supervisors—selected by
their peers from each of the region’s 18 incorporated cities and the County.
Representatives from Imperial County, Caltrans, the U.S. Department of Defense, Port of San Diego,
San Diego County Water Authority, San Diego Metropolitan Transit System, San Diego County Regional
Airport Authority, North County Transit District (NCTD), Southern California Tribal Chairmen’s Association,
and Mexico serve on the Board as non-voting advisory members.
Most matters are decided by a simple tally vote; however, under some circumstances, the Board may take a
weighted vote based on population that can supersede the tally vote. Each of the 19 local jurisdictions has
one tally vote. The weighted vote is proportional to each jurisdiction’s population as a percentage of
San Diego County as a whole. Pursuant to Public Utilities Code Section 132351.2, each agency must have at
least one vote, there are no fractional votes, and no agency may have more than 50 votes. The weighted vote
distribution must equal 100 votes in total and is calculated based on California Department of Finance
population figures each year. Below is the distribution of weighted votes as of July 1, 2019:
Carlsbad 3 Escondido 4 Poway 1
Chula Vista 8 Imperial Beach 1 San Diego 42
Coronado 1 La Mesa 2 San Marcos 3
County of San Diego 15 Lemon Grove 1 Santee 2
Del Mar 1 National City 2 Solana Beach 1
El Cajon 3 Oceanside 5 Vista 3
Encinitas 2
Committee Structure
Working Group
Social Services Transportation Advisory Council
Interagency Technical Working Group on Tribal Transportation
Issues
Board of Directors
San Diego Regional Military Working Group
Shoreline Preservation Working Group*
Regional Energy Working Group*
T em
Interagency Technical Working Group on Tribal Transportation
Issues
Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS) Business
Working Group
Board of Directors E
* Chaired by elected official
FY 2021 Strategic Initiatives and Priority Projects
The Strategic Initiatives outlined by SANDAG are long-term agencywide goals. The Priority Projects—designed to
support the Strategic Initiatives—are updated each year to highlight structural changes or particular areas of focus for
the coming year.
Implement organization effectiveness actions
SANDAG must think, work, and plan differently as the region changes. The strategic planning project that started in
2019 produced a set of recommendations tied to workplace culture, organization structure, and internal operations.
Together, these actions serve as a comprehensive roadmap for optimizing the agency’s overall capacity and ensuring
SANDAG successfully delivers on its regional responsibilities through improved levels of performance.
Modernize the agency’s supporting systems and technology
For SANDAG to become a world-class organization and deliver its vision for the region’s future, the best equipment,
technology, and training are necessary. The agency has embarked on an effort to modernize digital technology used
throughout the agency, to enable staff to collaborate better and to work more effectively and efficiently. Over the
next few years, the agency will update its capabilities in finance, human resources, payroll, telecommunications,
desktop, and mobile computing and in the use of cloud-based systems.
Become a data-driven organization
SANDAG is using real-time data to solve real world challenges. The agency is working to implement datasolutions
that areboth secure and innovative, with an objective to develop a data-driven culture within the agency that fosters
collaboration with public and private partners. SANDAG will deliver data servicesthat will help to better illuminate
issues and opportunities, and will enhance decision-making and policy development.
Priority Projects
Five main priorities will drive SANDAG’s work in FY 2021:
1. San Diego Forward: The 2021 Regional Plan
Two important milestones were reached in fall 2019 to help SANDAG continue to develop a bold new vision for
San Diego Forward: The 2021 Regional Plan (2021 Regional Plan). On October 8, 2019, California Governor
Gavin Newsom signed Assembly Bill 1730 (Gonzalez) into law, which in effect keeps the region in compliance with
state laws and ensures that important state funds continue to flow into the region while the 2021 Regional Plan is
developed. Second, on November 15, 2019, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit
Administration (FTA), in consultation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, approved the 2019 Federal
Regional Transportation Plan (2019 Federal RTP). The 2019 Federal RTP, developed by SANDAG throughout 2019, is
the region’s current long-range plan and maintains the region’s eligibility for state and federal transportation funding
while the agency continues to develop the 2021 Regional Plan.
The bold new transportation vision for the 2021 Regional Plan will focus on creating a balanced transportation system
through the implementation of five strategies SANDAG refers to as the “5 Big Moves” — Complete Corridors,
Transit Leap, Mobility Hubs, Flexible Fleets, and Next Operating System (Next OS).
These closely coordinated initiatives create a framework for a transformative vision for mobility in our region, and this
FY 2021 budget reflects the region’s early steps toward realizing that vision.
Complete Corridors focuses on improving how people travel by balancing the need for dedicated space for cars,
transit vehicles, shared mobility options, bike riders, pedestrians, commercial vehicles, and other fleets of vehicles that
promote individual mobility (Flexible Fleets) including small transit shuttles and rideshare services such as Uber and
Lyft. The anticipated benefits of developing Complete Corridors include: increased roadway capacity, reduced
congestion and air pollution, shorter travel times, increased transit ridership, improved safety, and the maximization of
existing infrastructure.
1-6 Chapter 1 | Overview
Transit Leap is an initiative to create a complete network of high-speed, high-capacity, and frequent transit services
that connect major residential areas with employment centers and local attractions. New high-speed transit services,
covering longer distances with limited stops, may be separated from vehicle traffic with bridges, tunnels, or dedicated
lanes. Service times will be expanded, transit will be more personalized with a greater variety of vehicles and types of
service, and new and existing transit service will transition to electric power or alternative fuels to decrease GHG.
Less congestion, faster transit travel times, reduced air pollution, decreased demand for parking, and lower household
transportation costs are among the anticipated benefits.
Mobility Hubs are places of connectivity where different types of travel options – walking, biking, transit, and shared
mobility – come together. They are uniquely designed around the needs of communities and better connect high-
frequency transit to an individual’s origin or destination. Mobility Hubs offer people safe walkways and bikeways;
shared mobility options such as transit, on-demand rideshare, and smaller vehicles such as scooters and bikes; support
services such as real-time travel information and charging stations for electric cars and bikes; and other features.
Higher transit ridership, less congestion, reduced air pollution, and increased mobility for seniors and people with
disabilities are among the anticipated benefits of Mobility Hubs.
Flexible Fleets will provide people with shared vehicles for all types of trips 24 hours a day and seven days a week – all
aimed at improving individual mobility. They will provide important connections between high-speed transit and key
destinations such as work and home, making it easier for people to choose public transit and can reduce the need to
own a car. Anticipated benefits include better access to transit, trip convenience, reduced air pollution, congestion
relief, and increased mobility for seniors and people who are physically disabled.
Next OS is the “brain” of the entire transportation system, and it will be the digital platform through which
technology and data can be used to connect and manage different modes of transportation – including passenger
vehicles, buses, ridesharing vehicles, delivery trucks, bikes, scooters, and more. The result will be roadways and transit
services that operate more smoothly and serve people better. Next OS will make the other four big moves discussed
above work in unison to give people a seamless travel experience across all modes of transportation.
On July 12, 2019, the Board directed staff to continue public outreach and develop a Regional Plan that conforms to
all applicable federal and state laws, including state GHG targets; provides realistic and transparent revenue
assumptions; utilizes the 5 Big Moves and complete corridor model, including highway and transit improvements; and
prioritizes corridors previously scheduled for investment such as State Routes 78, 52, 67, and 94/125.
2. Del Mar Bluffs Stabilization
In the City of Del Mar, construction began in FY 2020 on the fourth phase of stabilization efforts along the coastal
bluffs. These improvements include the installation of support columns that stabilize localized areas and sea walls,
construction of a drainage channel on the top of the bluffs, repair of concrete channels, and stabilization of storm
chute outfalls and an existing headwall.
SANDAG and NCTD are currently seeking $100 million to accelerate two more phases of stabilization projects,
Del Mar Bluffs Phase 5 and 6. Phase 5 is currently funded through design and will address additional seismic and
general stabilization needs, install additional support columns, and replace more aging drainage structures. Phase 6
will continue to provide long-term rehabilitation and stabilization work, including protecting the base of the bluffs
against additional bluff retreat and improved pedestrian access. Simultaneously, to ensure the long-term viability of
the corridor, SANDAG also is seeking $5 million to study potential long-term solutions, which could include tunneling
below Del Mar.
3. Mid-Coast Trolley Project
Under construction since late 2016, the Mid-Coast Trolley project will extend…
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