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EARLY INTERVENTION

Feb 25, 2016

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EARLY INTERVENTION. ECED 2060. Handicapped Children’s Early Education Assistance Act (PL 90-538), 1968. Purpose was to improve early intervention services for children with disabilities or who were at risk for disabilities, and their families. Experimental centers – “First Chance Network” - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

EARLY INTERVENTION

EARLY INTERVENTIONECED 2060

Handicapped Childrens Early Education Assistance Act (PL 90-538), 1968Purpose was to improve early intervention services for children with disabilities or who were at risk for disabilities, and their families.Experimental centers First Chance NetworkBetter early educational practicesParent involvement activitiesProgram evaluation systemsFederal $ for centersRenamed Early Education Project for Children with Disabilities in 1992.

Head Start Open door policy ALL children who met the economic requirement, regardless of developmental status, were included in Head Start.1972 10% of enrollment reserved for children with developmental disabilities, even children with severely handicapped children.Since Head Start began in 1965, more than 23 million children have attended.Today, more than 12.5% of children who attend have an identified disability.

Education of the Handicapped Amendments (PL 99-457), 1986Part H discretionary legislation(now Part C) Children ages birth to 3 States may opt to provide services; not required by law to do so (1986 reauthorization)States are given grants (2004) to provide early intervention for children ages birth to 3.

Part B of IDEAPart B governs special education and related services for children with disabilities between the ages of 3 and 21.

Part C of IDEAInfants and Toddlers with DisabilitiesFor children under the age of 3, with some exceptions urgent and substantial need to recognize the significant brain development that occurs during a childs first 3 years of life urgent and substantial need to maximize the potential for individuals with disabilities to live independently in society

REQUIREMENTS for States who are providing an early intervention program (IDEA, 2004):Early intervention services based on scientific researchTimely, comprehensive, multidisciplinary evaluation of child and familyIndividualized Family Service PlanComprehensive Child Find systemPublic awareness program focusing on early identificationCentral directory that includes information on early intervention services, resources, and expertsComprehensive system of personnel development

More requirements Policies and procedures to ensure that personnel are adequately prepared and trainedA single line of responsibility in a lead agency A policy about contracting with service providersA procedure for securing timely reimbursements of fundsA system for compiling dataA State interagency coordinating councilPolicies and procedures to ensure that:To the maximum extent possible, services are provided in natural environments;If not, the setting is most appropriate, as determined by the parents and IFSP team

Early InterventionEarly intervening services new in IDEA 2004requires that schools use proven methods of teaching and learning based on replicable research.Provided in natural environments, including the home, and community settings to the maximum extent possible.

Congress finds that there is an urgent and substantial need 1. to enhance the development of infants and toddlers with disabilities, to minimize their potential for developmental delay, and to recognize the significant brain development that occurs during a childs first 3 years of life;2. to reduce the educational costs to our society, including our Nations schools, by minimizing the need for special education and related services after infants and toddlers with disabilities reach school age;3. to maximize the potential for individuals with disabilities to live independently in society;4. to enhance the capacity of families to meet the special needs of their infants and toddlers with disabilities; and5. to enhance the capacity of State and local agencies and service providers to identify, evaluate, and meet the needs of all children, particularly minority, low-income, inner city, and rural children, and infants and toddlers in foster care.9Early InterventionIt is the policy of the United States to provide financial assistance to States to develop and implement a statewide, comprehensive, coordinated, multidisciplinary, interagency system that provides early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families Prevention of secondary problems that may occur as a result of the primary disability.

It is the policy of the United States to provide financial assistance to states 1. to develop and implement a statewide, comprehensive, coordinated, multidisciplinary, interagency system that provides early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families;2. to facilitate the coordination of payment for early intervention services from Federal, State, local, and private sources (including public and private insurance coverage); 3. to enhance State capacity to provide quality early intervention services and expand and improve existing early intervention services being provided to infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families;4. to encourage States to expand opportunities for children under 3 years of age who would be at risk for having substantial developmental delay if they did not receive early intervention services.10Early InterventionDevelopmental services that are:Provided under public supervision;Are provided at no cost except where Federal or State law provides for a system of payments by families, including a schedule of sliding fees;Are designed to meet the developmental needs of an infant or toddler with a disability, as identified by the individualized family service plan team in any 1 or more of the following areas:Physical developmentCognitive developmentCommunication developmentSocial or emotional developmentAdaptive development

At Risk Infant or ToddlerAn individual under 3 years of age who would be at risk of experiencing a substantial developmental delay if early intervention services were not provided to the individual.

Infant or Toddler With a DisabilityAn individual under 3 years of age who needs early intervention services because the individual is experiencing developmental delays or has a diagnosed physical or mental condition that has a high probability of resulting in developmental delay.

Developmental DelayDefined by each individual state Basically, however:A delay in one or more of the following areas:Cognitive developmentPhysical developmentCommunication developmentSocial and emotional developmentAdaptive development

OR

Has a diagnosed mental or physical condition that has a high probability of resulting in developmental delay.

Developmental DelayThe term developmental delay is generally used for infants, toddlers, and sometimes preschoolers (up to age 5).However, it can extend to age 9.State discretion for much of this

Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP)Legal requirements similar to IEPs, but including a family-directed assessment of the familys resources, priorities, and concerns. New requirement that the IFSP must include measurable results or outcomes expected to be achieved including pre-literacy and language skillsUsually only used for infants and toddlers, but may be used for preschoolers and possibly older not commonly

Child FindChild Find requires school districts to identify, locate, and evaluate ALL children with disabilities, including children who are homeless, home schooled, wards of the state, and children who attend private schools.If the child has a disability and is eligible for special education services, the school does not have to give the child a label before providing services.

Early Intervention Services:Family training, counseling, and home visitsSpecial instruction

Early Intervention Services:Speech-language pathology and audiology services, and sign language and cued language servicesOccupational therapy

Early Intervention Services:Physical therapyPsychological services

Early Intervention Services:Service coordination servicesMedical services only for diagnostic or evaluation purposes

Early Intervention Services:Early identification, screening, and assessment servicesHealth services necessary to enable the infant or toddler to benefit from the other early intervention services

Early Intervention Services:Social work servicesVision services

Early Intervention Services:Assistive technology devices and assistive technology servicesTransportation and related costs that are necessary to enable an infant or toddler and their family to receive another service.

Early InterventionistsSpecial educatorsSpeech/language pathologistsAudiologistsOccupational therapistsPhysical therapistsPsychologistsSocial workersNursesRegistered dieticiansFamily therapistsVision specialists, including optometrists and ophthalmologistsOrientation and mobility specialistsPediatricians and other physicians

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