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Differentiating & Scaffolding Instruction ... Differentiating & Scaffolding Instruction Ryan Mathis, Mathematics Interventionist Specialist, TDOE Holly Pillow, Mathematics Coach...

Jun 19, 2020

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  • Differentiating & Scaffolding

    Instruction

    Ryan Mathis, Mathematics Interventionist Specialist, TDOE Holly Pillow, Mathematics Coach & Interventionist, Trenton Special School District

    Responding to the Needs of All Learners

  • Welcome

  • Goals and Objectives

    All means all.

    • To understand the guiding principals of differentiation and scaffolding and how it benefits all learners.

    • To gain a deeper understanding of the founding principals of differentiation: environment, content, process, and product

    • To develop research-based instructional strategies to best meet the needs of all learners within core instruction

    • To feel more prepared in developing differentiated and scaffolded lessons to best deliver rigorous Tennessee State Standards for diverse learners.

  • Purpose

    “There is no formula or recipe that works for all learners in all times. There is no set of lesson plans or units that can engage the range of learning styles, approaches, and intelligences that are likely to gather in one classroom.”

    William Ayres, To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher

  • http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http://writenow21st.blogspot.com/&ei=McRtVe-8FoG_sQW1poGYDQ&bvm=bv.94455598,d.cWc&psig=AFQjCNH4WCY6jvHNoEItUGdxmvFQyfsDsw&ust=1433343348381656

  • Tennessee Landscape for Student’s with a Disability (SWD)

  • How are we scheduling SWDs for Instruction & Intervention?

    In General Ed 80% or more of the day

    In General Ed 40%- 70% of the day

    In General Ed

  • Comparing SWDs achievement data to all students

  • Why Focus on Long Term Success? • A student who can't read on grade level by 3rd grade is 4x less likely to graduate by age 19 than a child who does read proficiently in 3rd grade. Add poverty to the mix, and a student is 13x less likely to graduate on time than his or her proficient, wealthier peers. - American Educational Research Association • 16 percent of students overall do not receive a diploma by age 19, but students who struggle with reading in the first few years of elementary school comprise 88 percent of those who do not receive a diploma. - Bureau of Labor Statistics National Longitudinal Study of Youth • http://www.readinghorizons.com/blog/post/2011/04/20/Poor-Reading-Skills-Are-Responsiblefor-More-

    Dropouts-Than-Poverty.aspx

  • Setting the Stage

  • The Challenge

    Currently, nearly 50% of all Americans reach their mid-20s without the skills or credentials essential for success in today’s

    increasingly demanding workforce.

    If we fail to expand the ways in which we educate and prepare our students for postsecondary education and the workforce, their future quality of life will suffer, our communities will lose out on unrealized contributions, and the impact on our various

    economies will be pronounced.

    In Tennessee, 55% of existing and predicted jobs will require at least a technical certification or a two-year degree and

    relevant workplace skills by 2025.

  • Continuum of Instructional Support

    •ALL students •Core Instruction •Differentiated to meet diverse needs

    Tier I Instruction

    •In addition to Tier I •Skills focused •Targeted to student deficits

    v Tier II

    Intervention

    •In addition to Tier I •Skills focused •Intensive to meet specific student needs

    Tier III Intervention

    •In addition to Tier I •Most Intensive support to meet individualized student needs •Highest frequency of monitoring

    Special Education

    Intervention

    Becomes more specific and intense

  • Instructionally Appropriate IEP Data Review: Turn & Talk • Identify grade level/band and assign case study (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12) • Divide into groups based on grade/content area • Review the student who has an IEP case study

    • Make notes and highlight information that you find important

    about this student

    • Discuss with your grade level/content groups on what core instruction needs to look like for this particular student within the LRE

    • Share out and discuss

  • Differentiating & Scaffolding Instruction: Turn & Talk • What does this mean to me as an educator?

    • Why is this important for the students in the classroom?

    • Collaborate with your table /share out.

  • Differentiation of Instruction

  • Understanding vs. Reality in Education Practice

    What We Know What We Often Do Students are more diverse today than at any time in our history. Diversity is normal and beneficial.

    Intelligence is fluid, not static. Virtually all students can learn what is necessary for school success if they work intelligently, diligently, and with strong classroom support. Classroom environments that are rooted in strong teacher-student relationships and that build communities of learners have a highly positive impact on student outcomes. Curriculum should help students understand how the disciplines are organized to make sense, be engaging, focus on student understanding and transfer of knowledge, be relevant to students’ lives, and cast them as thinkers and problem solvers.

  • Understanding vs. Reality in Education Practice

    What We Know What We Often Do Formative assessment that is used to provide quality feedback, to guide instructional planning, and to develop student autonomy has a powerful impact on student learning.

    Student differences matter in learning, and attending to those differences is necessary for sustaining learning. Instruction that is responsive to student readiness, interest, and approach to learning supports success for more learners. Classroom management facilitates growth best when it balances predictability and flexibility, fosters student self-direction, and is built on sound student- teacher relationships. Labeling and sorting students has not proven effective in raising student achievement and carries a significant price in terms of student perception of their own ability and that of others.

  • Understanding vs. Reality in Education Practice

    What We Know What We Often Do Students are more diverse today than at any time in our history. Diversity is normal and beneficial.

    We tend to see student variance as problematic.

    Intelligence is fluid, not static. Virtually all students can learn what is necessary for school success if they work intelligently, diligently, and with strong classroom support.

    Schools tend to have a preference for determining which students are smart and which are not in order to separate them for instructional convenience.

    Classroom environments that are rooted in strong teacher-student relationships and that build communities of learners have a highly positive impact on student outcomes.

    Teachers often feel they have too many students and too many demands to know students well. Classrooms are often collections of individuals rather than teams of learners.

    Curriculum should help students understand how the disciplines are organized to make sense, be engaging, focus on student understanding and transfer of knowledge, be relevant to students’ lives, and cast them as thinkers and problem solvers.

    Curriculum is often dictated by standards, pacing guides, and texts. It rarely connects with students’ lives or helps students make sense of the world around them. Emphasis on “right answers” discourages deep thinking and meaning making.

  • Understanding vs. Reality in Education Practice

    What We Know What We Often Do Formative assessment that is used to provide quality feedback, to guide instructional planning, and to develop student autonomy has a powerful impact on student learning.

    Formative assessment is often used to give grades and infrequently used to modify instruction in response to varied learner needs. Students infrequently use formative assessment feedback to plan for their own success.

    Student differences matter in learning, and attending to those differences is necessary for sustaining learning.

    We tend to teach as though all students of a given age are essentially alike.

    Instruction that is responsive to student readiness, interest, and approach to learning supports success for more learners.

    We tend to persist in one-size-fits all approaches to teaching, learning, materials, pacing, etc.

    Classroom management facilitates growth best when it balances predictability and flexibility, fosters student self-direction, and is built on sound student- teacher relationships.

    Classroom management tends to be compliance oriented – rigid, stressing “right answers” rather than the “messiness of thinking,” and rooted in distrusts of students.

    Labeling and sorting students has not proven effective in raising student achievement and carries a significant price in terms of student perception of their own ability and that of others.

    We tend to prefer la

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