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Daily Habits During Quarantine

Mar 29, 2022

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Lifestyle

jennifer

While hand washing may be on the rise, other small, daily habits have been, for the most part, cut off during quarantine. What's the point in shaving your beard if no one's around to see your freshly groomed face? Does deodorant matter if you're not leaving the house? Most people have decided that social distancing also means they can distance themselves from certain hygiene habits they used to follow before going to work and school. But now we did a thing. We made it through more than a year of quarantine. And while we may never get back to the “old normal,” this new normal has brought about some interesting habits and behaviors we may (or not) want to keep around. 

Slide 1Overview
While hand washing may be on the rise, other small, daily habits have been, for the
most part, cut off during quarantine. What's the point in shaving your beard if no
one's around to see your freshly groomed face? Does deodorant matter if you're not
leaving the house? Most people have decided that social distancing also means they
can distance themselves from certain hygiene habits they used to follow before going
to work and school. But now we did a thing. We made it through more than a year of
quarantine. And while we may never get back to the “old normal,” this new normal
has brought about some interesting habits and behaviors we may (or not) want to
keep around.
Washing hair
In fact, so many people have ditched this hygiene habit in quarantine that there's
even a challenge on Instagram called #NoShampoo, where people show off what
their hair looks like unwashed.
Daily Habits People Have Ditched During
Quarantine
Ditched
During
Quarantine
In a poll by Sided, nearly 17 percent of respondents reported only brushing their
teeth once per day, compared to the recommended twice a day, while more than 8
percent said they just don't brush their teeth anymore.
Putting on
deodorant
We are forgetting to wear deodorant most days right now, right? And another called
herself "fancy" for finally putting on deodorant one day. Wearing deodorant when
you're stuck inside doesn't seem to be high on everyone's priority lists right now.
Shaving
Men and women alike are putting down their razors right now, as not much shaving is
taking place during quarantine. In fact, for men. However, if you are looking to adopt
a "quarantine beard," consider these beard styles that the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC) says can fit under a face mask.
Changing
clothes
Odds are, if you're not changing out of the same pair of sweatpants you wore
yesterday, other people aren't either. Many people have stopped "getting dressed" in
the morning, whether it be because they are working from home or are newly
unemployed.
Wearing
makeup
That full face of foundation no longer seems that important anymore since everyone is
stuck indoors. Many makeup wearers report that they are embracing their fresh
faces during quarantine and holding off on using up expensive beauty products while
they're not going out in public. Even celebrities are embracing the no-makeup look
during lockdown.
Sleeping
regularly
With all this time indoors, you would think people are taking advantage of their ability
to catch some sleep every day. But, not really. In fact, without the need to wake up
earlier to commute to work or school, many people have let their sleep cycles go
during lockdown. However, people suffering from change in their regular sleep
schedules may not be entirely to blame.
New Behaviors We Picked Up During
Quarantine
Desperate times have called for desperate measures — and during quarantine folks
have both invented a host of new sports and revisited forgotten ones.
Sports fans have sat through reruns in lieu of live events, and some sports-starved fans
have even turned to watching late-night live curling competitions overseas.
Being a good
sweat pants
Deciding on outfits is low on our priority list — who cares if you wear the same
pair of sweat pants all week anyway? Aside from potentially being a tad unhygienic,
youre missing out on the added value that comes with routine.
Trying viral
trends
Thanks to YouTube, being satisfied through trends like Mukbang — a Korean video
phenomena where people film themselves eating while talking to the camera
(sometimes quite loudly) — has taken off to the likes of hundreds of millions of
subscribers. Psychologists believe that the eating sounds in these videos have a similar
effect on viewers as ASMR videos, eliciting psychological and physiological sensations
that can lessen stress.
Changing
exercise
routines
With gyms closed and no rushing to meetings, weve looked to other ways to get
our heart pumping — such as brisk neighborhood walks and the resurgence of
biking and rollerblading.
As more movement enhances all aspects of our well-being, its one to stick with.
Staying up
later
When morning commutes were canceled, many ditched sensible bedtimes to watch
more TV.
But while „revenge bedtime procrastination is a very real tactic to garner a sense of
control, a lack of sleep can lead to everything from low mood to increased cancer
risk.
Embracing DIY
From painting walls to making handmade gifts, weve all been a little more DIY.
And craftiness is worth getting onboard with. Creativity has the potential to improve
quality of life, enhance mental functioning, and lower anxiety.
Logging extra
hours at work
With little else to occupy us, plenty of people have been putting in extra hours at the
home office.
But its important to set a finish time and stick to it, as overworking may have negative
effects on your sleep, heart health, mental health, and so much more.
Baking
If social media is anything to go by, few people havent not baked during quarantine.
Theres more than just good taste involved: Baking is a mindful activity that can
encourage happiness and reduce symptoms of depression.
Popular faves (and „Pinterest fails!): fresh bread loaves and banana bread bricks.
Playing with
puzzles
Simple but fun, millions have tackled a jigsaw puzzle (or three). Activities like this are
great for mindfulness and encouraging a sense of accomplishment — especially when
you place that final tile.
Planning meals
Cooking breakfast, lunch, and dinner can be tiring, but many have discovered
that meal planning can reduce kitchen stress, avoid food waste, and make you a more
confident cook.
Creating space
for self-care
„Self-care has been a big pandemic buzzword. From taking things sloooooow, to
reflecting on the positives of the day, this writer reveals how to get started — and
why its so beneficial.
Skipping
schedules
Without appointments and social commitments, its been easy for routines to go
awry. Keep to a schedule if you can, as doing so helps instill feelings of certainty,
control, and pleasure.
hours
With the fridge a few steps away and no boss around, its been oh-so-easy to indulge a
bit more. In fact, according to one study, 60% of respondents reported drinking more
for reasons ranging from increased stress, availability, and boredom. This raised real
concerns from both an individual and public health perspective.
Binge watching
is the new norm
“Tiger King,” “Hamilton,” and everything in between — we streamed a lot during
the pandemic. So much so that we ran out of new things to watch and started
rewatching old shows, from start to finish.
Watching an entire series in one day is a popular way to pass the time, but consider
pressing pause next time you go to hit play.
Adopting
family
members
As we found ourselves apart from family and friends, the number of pet adoptions
increased.
Apart from being cute and a fun distraction, pet companionship is linked to
better social-emotional behaviors and reduced levels of anxiety and depression.
Conclusion
Theres plenty of good habits we do that influence our well-being, like brushing our
teeth, exercising, and journaling. Others we do because we can, its convenient, or it
feels good to us.
On the flip side, there are those that arent inherently “bad” but you might be more
hesitant to admit to (like picking your nose when nobodys watching), and others that
can have more harmful effects on our health, especially if theyre done in excess —
such as smoking or drinking.
Plus, what one person deems an acceptable and positive habit might be viewed
entirely different by someone else.
Sources
Welcome message from author
There‟s plenty of good habits we do that influence our well-being, like brushing our teeth, exercising, and journaling. Others we do because we can, it‟s convenient, or it feels good to us.