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Cross-border Cooperation Austria - Hungary 2014-2020 Regional

Feb 01, 2017

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  • Cross-border Cooperation Austria - Hungary 2014-2020 Regional Analysis and SWOT

    DRAFT - 25.06.2013

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  • ETC Operational Programme Austria-Hungary 2014-2020 Regional Analysis/SWOT

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    Index 1. The Austrian-Hungarian Border Region .................................................................... 4

    1.1 Programme Area and Regional Structure ............................................................ 41.2 Regional Analysis ........................................................................................ 5

    1.2.1 Basic Description/Demography ................................................................. 51.2.2 Economy and Labour Market .................................................................... 71.2.3 Education, Research and Development ...................................................... 131.2.4 Environment and Energy ....................................................................... 181.2.5 Infrastructure and Mobility .................................................................... 211.2.6 Tourism and Leisure ............................................................................ 281.2.7 Social Services and Health Care .............................................................. 29

    1.3 SWOT Analysis ......................................................................................... 33

  • ETC Operational Programme Austria-Hungary 2014-2020 Regional Analysis/SWOT

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    1. THE AUSTRIAN-HUNGARIAN BORDER REGION

    1.1 PROGRAMME AREA AND REGIONAL STRUCTURE The Austrian - Hungarian border region fulfills an important bridge-building function between Western and Eastern Europe and stretches along a main corridor between the Baltic and Adriatic Seas. This excellent geographic location has contributed to an above average economic growth in recent years.

    Map 1 : General Map

    The programme area consists of eleven NUTS3 regions in Eastern and Southern Austria, as well as Western Hungary. It covers the Austrian NUTS 3 regions Nordburgenland, Mittelburgenland and Sdburgenland, Niedersterreich Sd, Wiener Umland/Sdteil, Wien, Graz and Oststeiermark and the Hungarian NUTS3 regions Gyr-Moson-Sopron, Vas and Zala, which, in combination, form the NUTS2 region Western Transdanubia. The region shows clearly visible regional disparities: north-south, west-east, urban agglomerations and structurally weak rural areas. For that it is difficult to make general statements. Thus finding a joint cooperation base like common interests or similar problems over the border might appear more challenging due to the different level of development by the individual regions.

  • ETC Operational Programme Austria-Hungary 2014-2020 Regional Analysis/SWOT

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    The core programme area remained in large part the same as in the period 2007 2013, with the addition of the metropolitan area of Graz being the only exception. Graz is an important transport hub and impulse centre in the southern part of the programme region.

    1.2 REGIONAL ANALYSIS

    1.2.1 BASIC DESCRIPTION/DEMOGRAPHY The region consists of approximately 4.2 Mio inhabitants within an area of 25.141 km. The Austrian regions represent 76,5% of the population on 55% of the area, and the Hungarian regions 23,5% of the population on 45,1% of the area.

    Table 1: Demographic main indicators of the region

    Source: Eurostat, Statistik Austria, Hungarian Statistical Office While Gyr-Moson-Sopron contributes the greatest area to the project region, the highest population is concentrated in Wien. Over the last 10 years population development shows two main trends facing the region; Peripheral areas have to deal with population stagnation and decrease, while urban areas and their surroundings like Wien and Graz encounter a strong population increase. The region also shows distinct north-south-divide. Wien and its surroundings grew over the last decade (overall due to migration from other parts of the programme region and from outside), the regions of Sdburgenland and Oststeiermark stagnated, and the Hungarian regions Vas and Zala lost over 4% of their population. Only Graz and its urban hinterland positively differ from this trend in the south. The population forecast for 2030 predicts a growing population for all Austrian regions, but with large regional disparities.

    Nuts area (km)population 2001 (census)

    population 2011 (as of january 1)

    population density 2011 (inhabitants/km)

    population development 2001-2011 in %

    percentage of regional population 2011

    population forecast 2030

    population forecast 2010-2030 %

    Mittelburgenland 700,8 38.096 37.522 54 -1,5% 0,9% 38.007 1,3%

    Nordburgenland 1.790,7 140.976 149.690 84 6,2% 3,5% 168.423 12,5%

    Sdburgenland 1.472,0 98.497 97.685 66 -0,8% 2,3% 99.546 1,9%

    Niedersterreich-Sd 3.374,1 246.144 253.055 75 2,8% 6,0% 276.667 9,3%

    Wiener Umland/Sdteil 1.475,8 293.335 319.066 216 8,8% 7,5% 381.188 19,5%

    Wien 414,7 1.550.123 1.714.142 4.134 10,6% 40,5% 1.901.723 10,9%

    Graz 1.230,4 357.548 404.093 328 13,0% 9,5% 454.837 12,6%

    Oststeiermark 3.354,0 268.054 267.010 80 -0,4% 6,3% 271.117 1,5%

    Gyr-Moson-Sopron 4.208,0 434.209 449.967 107 3,6% 10,6% n.a. n.a.

    Vas 3.337,0 269.149 257.688 77 -4,3% 6,1% n.a. n.a.

    Zala 3.784,0 300.496 287.043 76 -4,5% 6,8% n.a. n.a.

    whole region 25.141,4 3.996.627 4.236.961 169 6,0%

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    Map 2: Population development 2001-2011

    The region is characterized by a mix of ethnic groups on both sides of the border. The differences in population growth North-South have been historically less significant than EastWest differences and that remains the case today creating difficulties for efforts to strengthen regional economic cohesion.

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    Map 3: Urban System

    The region consists of a broad variety of urban agglomerations, small- and medium-sized towns and several rural communalities. Due to topography, the Austrian agglomerations are concentrated in a few core areas like Wien and Graz, while in Hungary the urban fabric is more evenly spread. The largest cities1 in the region are Wien (1,7 Mio. inhabitants), Graz (265.318), Gyr (131.267), Szombathely (79.590), Zalaegerszeg (61.970), Sopron (60.755), Nagykanizsa (49.850), Wiener Neustadt (41.537), Mosonmagyarvr (32.493) and Baden (25.142).

    1.2.1.1 Conclusions Urban areas are becoming continuously more attractive to inhabitants due to pull-factors such as working places, good infrastructure, better access to social services and health care as well as many educational opportunities. The demographic trends in the north have positive effects for the labour market and generate demand for higher level of services (eg. higher education, health and wellness, spas) and for quality products (eg. organic food products). At the same time, the southern region (aside from Graz) is faced with a decreasing population and emigration. The trend of an ever ageing population threatens to accelerate this phenomena.

    1.2.2 ECONOMY AND LABOUR MARKET Combined, the northern regions comprise one of the strongest economic regions of Europe. In comparison, the region of Mittelburgenland, as well as the Hungarian counties achieve less than 75% of the European average. Especially sharp differences can be observed between the Austrian regions Wien, Wiener Umland and Graz on one hand and the Hungarian counties of Zala and Vas on the other hand. Additionally, the negative impact of the economic crises was considerably larger on the Hungarian side of the border region than the Austrian side.

    Map 4: GDP per capita (PPS) and Gross value added at basic prices in Mio/per sector (2009)

    1 Source: Statistik Austria, 2012; Kzponti statisztikai hivatal, 2011.

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    Table 2: GDP per capita and GVA

    The general trend of the changing structure of the economy has been similar to all developed economies over the last decades: a decrease in the share of the primary sector (dominantly the

    2008 (Million EUR)

    2009 (Million EUR)

    2010 (Million EUR)

    2008/2010 (%)

    Mittelburgenland 73 679 676 664 -2,2%Nordburgenland 95 3267 3277 3434 5,1%Sdburgenland 79 1786 1769 1879 5,2%Niedersterreich-Sd 92 5590 5390 5654 1,1%Wiener Umland/Sdteil 152 11559 11281 11736 1,5%Wien 165 66814 65546 68288 2,2%Graz 143 13993 13577 13995 0,0%Oststeiermark 91 5530 5472 5871 6,2%Gyr-Moson-Sopron 77 4518 3701 4368 -3,3%Vas 56 2032 1649 1808 -11,0%Zala 54 2168 1838 1948 -10,1%Source: Eurostat

    GDP per capita (PPS) in % of EU-27

    average, 2010

    Gross value added at basic prices

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    agriculture in the border region), generally a decreasing employment trend in the secondary sector, and fast growth in the tertiary sector. However, the Austrian-Hungarian border region is not homogenous in this respect and shows obvious regional disparities. In the regions with highest per capita GDP

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