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Computer Networks Foundation

Apr 16, 2017

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The Seeds Of LearningOxfordCambridge.OrgComputer Networks Foundation

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Trinity College, Cambridge)The Seeds Of Learning

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning5/4/20141OxfordCambridge Dot Org

The Seeds Of LearningOxfordCambridge.OrgThe Seats of Learning

knowledge can free the mindWelcome!

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Trinity College, Cambridge)The Seeds Of Learning

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning5/4/20142OxfordCambridge Dot Org

KeyPoints to develop in your own time!

What?

How?

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Trinity College, Cambridge)The Seeds Of Learning

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning5/4/20143OxfordCambridge.Org

Computer Networks Foundation Summary.A network consists of two or more computers connected together which share resources such as data, printers, and an Internet connection.The term "networking" refers to the sharing of resources on a network.Local area networks (LANs) are one of the most widely used types of networks.The Open System Interconnection (OSI) model was developed in 1984 by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to resolve the problem of incompatible networks.

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of LearningComputer Networks Foundation - Aim of publication.To introduce the reader or the learner to basic networking concepts, topologies, the OSI model, and the media used to physically connect a network.

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Trinity College, Cambridge)The Seeds Of Learning

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of LearningComputer Networks Foundation - Learning Objectives.After developing the KeyPoints outlined in this publication, you should mainly be able to:identify the primary components of a network and distinguish between the two main network architectures.distinguish between the main types of networksdistinguish between the OSI reference model and the TCP/IP stack.distinguish between common network categorizations and identify the characteristics of data encapsulation.identify the major components of a network PC and list the resources required to install a NIC.identify the functions, features, and operation of network devices used at different layers of the OSI model.distinguish between different network topologiesmatch network devices to their functions and distinguish between different network topologies.differentiate between types of network media.recognize the types of cable connectors used in modern networks.determine the most appropriate network tool to use in a given scenario.

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning *** About the Structure and Flow of our Presentations ***

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of LearningComputer Networks Foundation - Sections List.(Section 1) Networking basics.(Section 2) Networking devices and topologies.(Section 3) Physical media.

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Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning(Section 1) Networking basics HighPoints.Networking overview.Types of networksThe OSI modelUnderstanding basic networking concepts.

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Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning(Section 1) HighPoints: Networking overview.A network is made up of two or more computers linked together.Networking is the term used to refer to the sharing of resources on the network.Networks can vary in size from local area networks (LANs), which are contained in a building, to wide area networks (WANs), such as the Internet.The three primary components of a network are a server, a workstation, and a host.Two of the most common network types are client/server and peer-to-peer.Peer-to-peer networks have no centralized authority while client/server networks are managed from a centralized point.Client/server networks have several advantages over peer-to-peer networks such as ease of management and better security.

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning(Section 1) HighPoints: Types of networks.A local area network (LAN) is used to connect workstations, servers, and peripheral devices, such as printers, together.It is confined to a small area, usually within a building.A wide area network (WAN) covers a large geographic area.WANs can be public or private. WANs have slower connection speeds than LANs.WANs use routers, WAN switches, and modems.The Internet is an example of a global WAN.A metropolitan area network (MAN) extends across a city or a large suburban area.A MAN develops when two or more LANs are connected together.An intranet is a private network contained inside a company.It can contain many LANs linked together.It allows employees to share information and access company resources.An extranet is part of a company's intranet that can be accessed by anyone outside the company.

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning(Section 1) HighPoints: The OSI model.The Open System Interconnection (OSI) reference model was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to correct the problem of incompatible network communications.It is a reference model that describes how information is exchanged between points on a network.The OSI model is divided into seven layers - these are the application, presentation, session, transport, network, data-link, and physical layers.Some of the advantages of layering network functions include accelerating evolution, reducing complexity, and standardizing network component interfaces.Encapsulation refers to the process of packaging information before it is transmitted.Thus, encapsulation occurs in descending order from the application layer through to the physical layer.Headers and trailers are placed around the data as it passes through each layer.

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning(Section 1) HighPoints: The OSI model (continues).Data packets always travel from source to destination on a network.They can only travel on a network if each layer of the OSI model at the source communicates with its peer layer at the destination.This form of communication is known as peer-to-peer communication.Another open standard traditionally applied to the Internet is the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) stack.Like the OSI model, it uses layering and is comprised of the application, transport, Internet, and network access layers.The TCP/IP and OSI models are similar in a number of ways.Both models have application, network, and transport layers, and they both deal with packet-switched technology.

Contact Email Design Copyright 1994-2014 OxfordCambridge.OrgCurricula/Curriculum(This picture: Harcourt Hill, West Oxford)The Seeds Of Learning(Section 1) HighPoints: Understanding basic networking concepts.There are different categorizations of networks used to identify their size, structure, and purpose.A WAN is a network that covers a large geographic area and can be used to link together the worldwide locations of a corporation.A MAN covers a large city or suburban area and consists of several LANs connected together.A LAN is a high-speed, low error data network that is confined to a small area, usually within a building.Data encapsulation occurs when data is systematically and consistently packaged before it is sent over the network.In the encapsulation process, the application layer contains the L7 header, the presentation layer contains the L6 L7 headers, and the session layer contains the L5 L6 L7 headers.A data packet contains the L4 L5 L6 L7 header at the transport layer, the L3 L4 L5 L6 L7 header at the network layer, and the L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 L7 header at the data-link layer.Bits are associated with the physical layer, frames with the data-link layer, packets with the network layer, and segments with the transport layer.

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