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Introduction Figure 1: Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972) In the late 30’s, Maurits Cornelis Escher astonished the artistic world by producing some puzzling drawings. In particular, the tesselations of the plane obtained by us- ing a single tile appear to be a major concern in his work, drawing attention from the mathematical com- munity. Since then, tesselations of the plane have been widely studied: see Gr¨ unbaum and Shephard (1987) for a general presentation. Among the many types Escher discovered, the simplest one concerns tilings obtained with trans- lated copies of a single tile: hexagonal (right) and square (below) tilings appeared in numerous of its drawings and prints. Immediately, two natural questions arise: 1. How can we recognize a tile? 2. How can we generate tiles? Figure 2: An hexagonal Tiling. Figure 3: A square Tiling. Of course, when dealing with boundaries described by continuous functions, it is necessary to represent them conveniently. As quoted on Doron’s website : Cauchy ruined mathematics. Let’s throw out all that epsilon-delta nonsense. —–Adriano Garsia, talk at the Journ´ ees Pierre Leroux, Montreal, Sept. 8, 2006. So that a good way to deal with tiles is to use polyomi- noes, whose boundary is conveniently encoded on the four letter alphabet Σ = {0, 1, 2, 3}. Figure 4: T ILINGS OF R 2 . The general problem of deciding whether a given region tile the Euclidean plane R 2 is of great interest when studying tilings and cristal networks problems. The region R illustrated above has a continuous boundary that may be factorized in four paths that are pairwise parallel, so that it tiles the plane by translation. Now by using tools from combinatorics on words, it is possible to tackle these problems. For this purpose, let us quote the following characterization: Theorem 1 (Beauquier-Nivat,1991). A polyomino P tiles the plane by translation if and only if there exist A, B, C Σ * such that W A · B · C · b A · b B · b C, where W is some boundary word of P and at most one of the variables A, B, C is empty. Recognition of tiles Efficient algorithms have been designed: Square tiles: a linear optimal algorithm (B. and Provenc ¸al, 2006). Hexagonal tiles: if the polyominoes do not have too long square factors then the algorithm is still linear (B. and P., 2008). A general O(n log 3 (n)) algorithm also appears in Provenc ¸al’s thesis (2008). Conjecture: a linear algorithm exists. Multiple tilings Figure 5: D ISTINCT TILINGS . For any positive integer n, there exist polyominoes yielding n distinct hexagonal tilings. Polyominoes may have both square and hexagonal factorizations. In Figure 5 (top), the 4 × 1 rectan- gle has three distinct hexagonal tilings. It also has one square tiling. More generally, the (n + 1) × 1 rectangle yields n hexagonal tilings. Moreover, a hexagonal tile may have at most 1 square tiling. Figure 5 (bottom) shows a tile admitting two distinct square tilings. And in fact all tiles admit at most two square tilings, that is either 0, 1 or 2 distinct ones: Theorem 2. The number of distinct BN-factorizations of a square is at most 2. Tiles having exactly two square factorizations define two sets of distinct translations and are called double squares. On the right, one of the two tesselations of a double square. The second one is obtained by taking the (vertical) mirror image. There are infinite families of such double squares, and in particular, two remarkable families of squares are linked to the Christoffel words and to the Fibonacci sequence. Christoffel tiles Consider the morphism λ : {0, 1, 2, 3} * →{0, 1, 2, 3} * by λ (0)= 0301 and λ (1)= 01, which can be seen as a “crenelation” of the steps east and north-east. (a) (0, 0) (5, 3) w = 00100101 (b) λ (w)ρ 2 (λ (w)) Figure 6: C HRISTOFFEL TILES . An infinite family of double squares are the so-called Christoffel tiles. They are crenellated versions of discrete segments. Indeed, Christoffel tiles are exactly given by λ (w w), where w is any Christoffel word, up to rotations and reflections on Z 2 . (a) The Christoffel word of parameters (5, 3). (b) Its associated Christoffel tile. Fibonacci tiles Figure 7: F IBONACCI TILES . Another remarkable family of double-squares are the Fibonacci tiles. Above are listed those of order n = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. Figure 8: F IBONACCI T ILING . Tilings of the Fibonacci Tile of order 2 illustrate that it is a double square tile. 169 P 3 = 5 P 4 = 12 P 6 = 169 = 5 2 + 12 2 Figure 9: A LINK WITH THE P ELL NUMBERS . Fibonacci tiles are related both to the Fibonacci sequence and the Pell numbers, i.e. they contain both the golden and silver ratios. More precisely, the area of the Fibonacci tiles is described by the subsequence of odd indexed Pell numbers 0, 1, 2, 5, 12, 29, 70, 169, 408, 985, 2378, 5741, 13860, 33461, 80782,..., defined by P 0 = 0, P 1 = 1, P n = 2P n-1 + P n-2 , for n > 1. They are known to satisfy the identity P 2 n + P 2 n+1 = P 2n+1 . Enumeration and generation of double squares SHRINK 1 SHRINK 0 SWAP 1 SHRINK 1 SHRINK 3 SWAP 0 SHRINK 0 SHRINK 2 SWAP 0 SHRINK 0 SHRINK 2 Figure 10: D OUBLE SQUARES . The problem of characterizing the double squares has been studied in Blondin Mass´ e et al. (2010), where it is shown that every double square reduces to a morphic pentamino cross by mean of three operators of reduction acting on possibly self-intersecting double squares. Combinatorial aspects of Escher tilings S. Brlek 1 , A. Blondin Mass´ e 12 and S. Labb´ e 13 . 1 Laboratoire de combinatoire et d’informatique math´ ematique, Universit´ e du Qu´ ebec ` a Montr´ eal, Montreal, Canada 2 Laboratoire de math´ ematiques, Universit´ e de Savoie, Le-Bourget-du-Lac, France 3 Laboratoire d’informatique, Universit´ e Montpellier II, Montpellier, France
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Combinatorial aspects of Escher tilingslinux.bucknell.edu/~pm040/Slides/Brlek.pdf · Figure 1: Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972) In the late 30’s, Maurits Cornelis Escher astonished

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Page 1: Combinatorial aspects of Escher tilingslinux.bucknell.edu/~pm040/Slides/Brlek.pdf · Figure 1: Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972) In the late 30’s, Maurits Cornelis Escher astonished

Introduction

Figure 1: Maurits Cornelis Escher (1898-1972)

In the late 30’s, Maurits Cornelis Escher astonished theartistic world by producing some puzzling drawings. Inparticular, the tesselations of the plane obtained by us-ing a single tile appear to be a major concern in hiswork, drawing attention from the mathematical com-munity. Since then, tesselations of the plane have beenwidely studied: see Grunbaum and Shephard (1987) fora general presentation.

Among the many types Escher discovered, thesimplest one concerns tilings obtained with trans-lated copies of a single tile: hexagonal (right) andsquare (below) tilings appeared in numerous ofits drawings and prints. Immediately, two naturalquestions arise:

1. How can we recognize a tile?

2. How can we generate tiles?

IntroductionThe tiling by translation problem

Generation of squares tilesDouble Squares

M.C. EscherEscher TilingsDiscrete figures

Figure: Hexagonal tiling

Ariane Garon Words2009:Palindromes and local periodicity

Figure 2: An hexagonal Tiling.

Figure 3: A square Tiling.

Of course, when dealing with boundaries described bycontinuous functions, it is necessary to represent themconveniently. As quoted on Doron’s website :

Cauchy ruined mathematics. Let’s throw out allthat epsilon-delta nonsense.

—–Adriano Garsia,

talk at the Journees Pierre Leroux, Montreal, Sept. 8, 2006.

So that a good way to deal with tiles is to use polyomi-noes, whose boundary is conveniently encoded on thefour letter alphabet Σ = {0,1,2,3}.

Figure 4: TILINGS OF R2. The general problem of deciding whether a given region tile the Euclidean plane R2 isof great interest when studying tilings and cristal networks problems. The region R illustrated above has a continuousboundary that may be factorized in four paths that are pairwise parallel, so that it tiles the plane by translation.

Now by using tools from combinatorics on words, it is possible to tackle these problems. For thispurpose, let us quote the following characterization:

Theorem 1 (Beauquier-Nivat,1991). A polyomino P tiles the plane by translation if and only if thereexist A,B,C ∈ Σ∗ such that

W ≡ A ·B ·C · A · B ·C,

where W is some boundary word of P and at most one of the variables A, B, C is empty.

Recognition of tiles Efficient algorithms have been designed:

Square tiles: a linear optimal algorithm (B. and Provencal, 2006).

Hexagonal tiles: if the polyominoes do not have too long square factors then the algorithm is stilllinear (B. and P., 2008). A general O(n log3(n)) algorithm also appears in Provencal’s thesis (2008).

Conjecture: a linear algorithm exists.

Multiple tilings

Figure 5: DISTINCT TILINGS. For any positive integer n, there exist polyominoes yielding n distinct hexagonal tilings.

Polyominoes may have both square and hexagonal factorizations. In Figure 5 (top), the 4×1 rectan-gle has three distinct hexagonal tilings. It also has one square tiling. More generally, the (n+1)×1rectangle yields n hexagonal tilings. Moreover, a hexagonal tile may have at most 1 square tiling.

Figure 5 (bottom) shows a tile admitting two distinct square tilings. And in fact all tiles admit atmost two square tilings, that is either 0, 1 or 2 distinct ones:

Theorem 2. The number of distinct BN-factorizations of a square is at most 2.

Tiles having exactly two square factorizations define two sets of distinct translations and are calleddouble squares.

On the right, one of the two tesselationsof a double square. The second one isobtained by taking the (vertical) mirrorimage.

There are infinite families of such double squares, and in particular, two remarkable families ofsquares are linked to the Christoffel words and to the Fibonacci sequence.

Christoffel tiles

Consider the morphism λ : {0,1,2,3}∗→{0,1,2,3}∗ by λ (0) = 0301 and λ (1) = 01, which can beseen as a “crenelation” of the steps east and north-east.

(a)

(0,0)

(5,3)

w = 00100101

(b) λ (w)ρ2(λ (w))

Figure 6: CHRISTOFFEL TILES. An infinite family of double squares are the so-called Christoffel tiles. They arecrenellated versions of discrete segments. Indeed, Christoffel tiles are exactly given by λ (ww), where w is any Christoffelword, up to rotations and reflections on Z2.(a) The Christoffel word of parameters (5,3). (b) Its associated Christoffel tile.

Fibonacci tiles

Figure 7: FIBONACCI TILES. Another remarkable family of double-squares are the Fibonacci tiles. Above are listedthose of order n = 0,1,2,3,4.

Figure 8: FIBONACCI TILING. Tilings of the Fibonacci Tile of order 2 illustrate that it is a double square tile.

169

P3 = 5

P4 = 12P6 = 169 = 52+122

Figure 9: A LINK WITH THE PELL NUMBERS. Fibonacci tiles are related both to the Fibonacci sequence and the Pellnumbers, i.e. they contain both the golden and silver ratios.

More precisely, the area of the Fibonacci tiles is described by the subsequence of odd indexed Pellnumbers 0,1,2,5,12,29,70,169,408,985,2378,5741,13860,33461,80782, . . ., defined by P0 = 0,P1 = 1, Pn = 2Pn−1+Pn−2, for n > 1. They are known to satisfy the identity P2

n +P2n+1 = P2n+1.

Enumeration and generation of double squares

SHRINK1 SHRINK0 SWAP1

SHRINK1

SHRINK3SWAP0SHRINK0

SHRINK2

SWAP0 SHRINK0 SHRINK2

Figure 10: DOUBLE SQUARES. The problem of characterizing the double squares has been studied in Blondin Masse etal. (2010), where it is shown that every double square reduces to a morphic pentamino cross by mean of three operatorsof reduction acting on possibly self-intersecting double squares.

Combinatorial aspects of Escher tilingsS. Brlek1, A. Blondin Masse12 and S. Labbe13.

1 Laboratoire de combinatoire et d’informatique mathematique, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, Canada2 Laboratoire de mathematiques, Universite de Savoie, Le-Bourget-du-Lac, France

3 Laboratoire d’informatique, Universite Montpellier II, Montpellier, France