Top Banner

Click here to load reader

Canterbury history and interesting facts - · PDF file Canterbury history and interesting facts Roman Canterbury: Canterbury's long history started in 0 AD as a Celtic Iron Age settlement.

May 25, 2020

ReportDownload

Documents

others

  •      

    Canterbury history and interesting facts      Roman Canterbury:    Canterbury's long history started in 0 AD as a Celtic Iron Age settlement. In 43 AD the  Romans invaded Britain and took over the settlement for 400 years. They rebuilt it in a grid  pattern with a wall around it, a market place in the centre, and temples and public baths.    Saxon Canterbury:    After the Romans left Britain in 407 AD town life broke down and Canterbury was probably  abandoned. There may have been a few farmers living inside the walls and growing crops or  raising animals but Canterbury ceased to be a town.    In 597, Pope Gregory the Great sent Augustine to convert the king of Kent to Christianity,  and an abbey and cathedral were built in Canterbury. In 603 Canterbury was chosen to be  the seat of the first archbishop. Once it was chosen to be his seat the town began to revive.  It now had a new importance.    By the 9th century Canterbury had grown into a busy little town. However it suffered severely  when the Danes began raiding England. Because it was close to the eastern shore of  England, Canterbury was a natural target and was raided twice, in 842 and 851. Both times  many people were killed.    In 1011 the Danes returned and laid siege to Canterbury. They captured it after 20 days,  burned the cathedral and most of the houses, and killed the archbishop.       

  •   Canterbury in the Middle Ages:    When William, the Duke of Normandy, invaded England in 1066 Canterbury surrendered  without a fight. The cathedral was destroyed by fire in 1067 and rebuilt. In 1174 it again was  severely damaged by fire, requiring major reconstruction.    The Normans also built a wooden castle in Canterbury. In the 12th century it was replaced  by a stone castle.    In 1170, the Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered at the cathedral, and pilgrims from  all parts of Christendom came to visit his shrine. This pilgrimage provided the framework for  Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th­century collection of stories, The Canterbury Tales.      Canterbury from 16th to 19th century:    From the 16th century, Canterbury became a relatively quiet market town, which had the  effect of preserving much of its medieval heritage.      Canterbury in the 20h century:    By the 20th century, its importance had grown again, as improvements in transport  (including the channel tunnel) made it accessible to visitors from the UK and the continent.  Canterbury now receives almost 2 million tourists each year.     

         

  •  

      Canterbury Cathedral   Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England  and forms part of a World Heritage Site. It’s the cathedral of the Archbishop of Canterbury,  leader of the Church of England and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion.    A pivotal moment in the history of the cathedral was the murder of the archbishop Thomas  Becket in 1170 by knights of King Henry II. The king had frequent conflicts with the  strong­willed Becket and is said to have exclaimed in frustration, "Who will rid me of this  turbulent priest?" Four knights took it literally and murdered Becket in his own cathedral. The  posthumous veneration of Becket made the cathedral a place of pilgrimage. This brought the  need to expand the cathedral.    The income from pilgrims who visited Becket's shrine, which was regarded as a place of  healing, largely paid for the subsequent rebuilding of the cathedral and its associated  buildings. This revenue included the profits from the sale of pilgrim badges depicting Becket,  his martyrdom, or his shrine.    The shrine was placed directly above Becket's original tomb in the crypt. A marble plinth,  raised on columns, supported what one visitor described as "a coffin wonderfully wrought of  gold and silver, and marvellously adorned with precious gems". The shrine was removed in  1538. Henry VIII summoned the dead saint to court to face charges of treason. Having failed  to appear, he was found guilty in his absence and the treasures of his shrine were  confiscated.     

  •  

      The Westgate   The Westgate is a medieval gatehouse in Canterbury. This 60­foot (18 m) high western gate  of the city wall is the largest surviving city gate in England. Built of Kentish ragstone around  1379, it is the last survivor of Canterbury's seven medieval gates, still well­preserved and  one of the city's most distinctive landmarks. The road still passes between its drum towers.  This scheduled monument and Grade I listed building houses the West Gate Towers  Museum.       

  •  

      Westgate Gardens  This is one of the city’s showpiece gardens, admired and enjoyed by residents and visitors.  The river, with its ever­present ducks and summertime punts,  is just one of the features  which makes Westgate Gardens special.    It is situated alongside Westgate Towers, the city’s 600­year­old gatehouse, and has been a  public open space since the Middle Ages, making it one of England’s oldest parks. Part of  the gardens is an official ancient monument site because it covers the remains of the old  Roman wall and London road gate.    There’s a Norman archway which may have been brought here in Victorian times from the  ruins of St Augustine’s Abbey.    It has a 200­year­old Oriental plane tree – the one with the huge trunk – which is believed to  be the oldest specimen in the country.       

  •  

      City Wall  Canterbury was surrounded by a wall in Roman times. The walls are mentioned in several  Anglo­Saxon documents. In 1011 the Danes succeeded in breaking into the city,  slaughtering the inhabitants, and tossing them over the walls.    There were six gates in use in medieval times: Northgate, Burgate, Newingate, Ridingate,  Worthgate and Westgate. Later another came into existence, Wincheap Gate. The walls  were frequently rebuilt and reconstructed but never called upon to withstand any real siege  after 1011, though the city represented an important strongpoint in the system of national  defence.    Traces of the wall survive here and there. A fragment of the Roman Queningate can be seen  in the city wall opposite St. Augustine's Great Gate, and further up nearer Burgate the  Roman foundation of the wall is visible.       

  •  

      Dane John Gardens   The historic gardens, located within the city walls of Canterbury, date back to 1551. The  gardens contain a mound believed to date from the first century AD and later a Norman  motte and bailey castle after which the gardens are named.       

  •  

      Dane John mound  Sitting just inside the city walls in Dane John gardens, a conical mound, rising 80 feet, which  historical records date back to at least the 1st century AD.    Visitors can take a spiral path to the top where there is a monument, dated 1803, to  Alderman Simmons, who paid for much of the landscaping in the gardens.       

  •  

      Norman Canterbury Castle  The ruined Canterbury Norman Castle is amongst the most ancient in Britain, begun by  William the Conqueror around 1070. The stone castle replaced an earlier motte and bailey  fortification built at the nearby Dane John. The keep was largely constructed in the reign of  Henry I (1100 ­ 1135) as one of three Royal castles in Kent. By the late 1300's it had been  overshadowed by the bigger fortifications at Dover and became a prison ­ by the  seventeenth century it was already ruined.     Today the roofless shell of Canterbury Norman Castle is surrounded by a quiet garden ­  inside you can climb part way up one of the towers. The castle grounds and ground floor of  the keep are accessible, but there is a narrow gateway through the stone walls into the keep  itself. At the entrance on Gas Street there is a tactile 3­D model of the castle as it would  have been in 1200AD.       

  •  

      The Beaney House of Art & Knowledge + Tourist information centre  The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge is the central museum, library and art gallery. It is  housed in a Grade II listed building.    The Beaney's collections include a nationally important body of work by English cattle artist  Thomas Sidney Cooper; displays on Canterbury's explorers; archaeological collections from  ancient Egypt and Anglo­Saxon Kent; Greek and Roman antiquities