Top Banner

Click here to load reader

BussinessMirror November 15, 2014

Apr 06, 2016

ReportDownload

Documents

 

  • By Catherine N. Pillas

    The european Union (eU) is encouraging the Philippines to seek an observer status in the World Trade Organizations (WTO) Government Procurement Agree-ment (GPA), noting that this will show to the international investment community the countrys commit-ment to promote competition here. Most of the investment stocks in the Philippines comes from the eU, but that is only a fraction of the almost 200 billion the eU is invest-ing around the world. The Philip-pines can get a much bigger share. By joining the GPA of the WTO as an observer, the government can show its engagement toward trans-parency, nondiscrimination and

    international competition, and benchmark its own policies against international ones, eU Ambassador to Manila Guy Ledoux said during the Philippine economic Societys 52nd Annual Meeting. The Philippines, as of 2012, only received 4 percent of the 208-bil-lion eU foreign direct investments (FDI) in the Asean region, according to data from the eU. Ledoux said estimates of FDI gain from eU cannot be definitely pegged. however, in the case of Tai-wan, which joined the GPA, the re-wards are evident. Ledoux championed a more trans-parent public-procurement process during his speech, underlining the move as essential to attracting more

    At a news conference on Friday, PAL President Jaime J. Bautista said the airline is working on a strategic plan that will shape the airlines fu-ture in hopes of becoming one of the best airlines in the world. Included in the medium-term plan is for PAL to seek a strategic investor in the next three years, Bautista said. There are names that we are looking at, but I am not at liberty

    to discuss, he said, adding that an airline serving more destinations is a good choice. It will be better if its an airline, or it can be a company with invest-ments in an airline. No preference of location of an airline operator but I would prefer an airline with more destinations so we can expand our presence, Bautista said.

    A broader look at todays businessBusinessMirrorthree-time rotary club of manila journalism awardee2006, 2010, 2012

    u.n. media award 2008

    www.businessmirror.com.ph n Saturday, November 15, 2014 Vol. 10 No. 37 P25.00 nationwide | 6 sections 28 pages | 7 dayS a week

    Peso exchange rates n us 44.8730 n jaPan 0.3877 n uK 70.5089 n hK 5.7866 n china 7.3265 n singaPore 34.7556 n australia 39.2144 n eu 55.9836 n saudi arabia 11.9598 Source: BSP (14 November 2014)

    Continued on A2

    WorldB3-1

    Obama, Suu Kyi call fOr mOre refOrmS in myanmar

    As a president, how do you think Barack Obama will go down in history?

    Outsta

    nding

    Above

    ave

    rage

    Aver

    age

    Below

    ave

    rage Po

    or

    Not s

    ure

    Outsta

    nding

    Above

    ave

    rage

    Aver

    age

    Below

    ave

    rage Po

    or

    Not s

    ure

    Source: yougov.comGraphic: Greg Good

    11%

    17%18%

    2010 2014

    16%

    28%

    10% 9%

    16%

    22%

    13%

    36%

    4%

    Obamas legacy

    2014 MCT

    PreSident barack Obama gave a blunt assessment of the need for further reform in myanmars move toward democracy, weighing into sensitive controversies over the treatment of religious minorities and a prohibition keeping opposition leader aung San Suu Kyi from running for president.

    U.S. President Barack Obama and Myanmars opposition leader aung San Suu kyi walk back to her home following the conclusion of their joint news conference in yangon, Myanmar, on Friday.

    AP/PAblo MArtiNez MoNsiVAis

    a perfect performance is a boring one

    TABLE DECORATIONS

    SET THEMOOD...

    D2Life Saturday, November 15, 2014 D1BusinessMirrorEditor: Gerard S. Ramos [email protected]

    B A S

    TO have achieved so much at such a young age, the award-winning pianist Christian Leotta is as much as a genius as he is modest.Considered as one of the few pianists in history who has successfully recorded all of Ludwig van Beethovens 32 piano sonatas, Leotta graced Manila last Tuesday night to make his debut performance in the country, titled An Evening with Christian Leotta: From Bach to the Romantic Piano of Schibert, Rossini and Beethoven, at the Tanghalang Aurelio Tolentino (Little Theater) of the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP).

    The Italian virtuosos program consisted of Johann Sebastian Bachs Capriccio sopra la lontananza del suo fratello dilettismo BWV 992 (Capriccio on the departure of his most beloved brother), Franz Schuberts Piano Sonata in A minor Opus posth. 143, 0784, Gioachino Rossinis Memento homo and Une caresse a ma femme, and Beethovens Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor Op. 57 Appassionata.

    Each city is different so Ill treat Manila in a way like no other, Leotta told the media the day before the big event. Born in Catania, Italy, Leotta, 34, is considered to be the youngest pianist since Daniel Barenboim to have performed and recorded all of Beethovens Piano Sonatas, a musical milestone that is no easy feat. He began performing the complete cycle of Beethovens 32 sonatas at the early age of 22, which he completed in a period of less than a month. Since then, he has successfully performed 15 cycles around the worlds international music capitals, such as Madrid, Mexico City, Vancouver, Venice and Rio de Janeiro.

    Every day I play, Leotta said. [To become a great pianist,] the first rule is practice. The second rule is practice. The third rule is practice.

    The masters [who were based in] ViennaMozart, Haydn, Beethoven and Schuberttheir pieces are the most difficult, the most profound, and they require the performer to know their style, otherwise there is no point in performing their pieces, he said.

    But for Leotta, Beethoven is the most universal of all composers, and he has been hailed by international press as one of the major Beethoven soloists of our time. The Canadian magazine WholeNote considers Leottas prodigious technique to be better expressive of the

    poetry of Beethovens music, while the US magazine Fanfare defined his complete recording of the maestros 32 piano sonatas as a major addition to other sets currently available.

    THE GREATEST PLEASUREA PERFECT performance is the most boring performance. When the feeling is right, mistakes cannot be heard.

    Every time Leotta performs onstage in front of a live audience, he said that the most difficult part about the performance is to make the public be with you.

    Music requires the highest level of concentration, knowledge...everything, he said. The greatest moment is when you hear that what you are playing [with your hands] is exactly what you are feeling [inside you]. Thats the greatest pleasure for a performersharing what is in your heart with the public, without any walls.

    He added that music, to him, is a language not unlike reading a poem because you do not need to imagine anything further, the meaning will be right in front of you. The beauty of music is that it does not need to describe anything. Pure music describes what your

    mind is able to reach.Leotta is grateful to his teachers, who explained to

    him the tradition and the importance of music.They really knew the meaning of the pieces. If

    anything was missing [in my performance], they would stop me and point it out, Leotta said. [Performers] are interpreters and have to do what is written on the score. Beethoven knew what he wanted and all we have to do is understand and perform what the music wants without adding anything. At the end of the day, however, Leotta said that he would prefer to rest his ears than listen to other music when he is not onstage performing.

    When I do not play, I am tired. I do not want to hear anything else because when I hear something, I end up analyzing it, he said. Music becomes work, and when it starts playing, [I cannot help but to] think about the structure, the harmony, the form.

    ITS ABOUT FEELINGASKED to comment about the pianists of this generation compared with before, Leotta said that piano schools of the previous generation started to lose what the music was all about.

    Its about feeling. Its about magic. Its about making the public dream, Leotta said. All the rest is not importantbut, unfortunately, that was became the focus. He lamented that piano schools forgot the important aspects of the music, and this is why the present generation rarely plays or even listens to Beethoven, Mozart and Schubert.

    [People] are intimidated by classical music because it is nowhere. Where do you listen to classical music today? They should start to put classical music in all the shops and all the restaurants, he said.

    However, Leotta added that the decline is not just the problem of pianists and piano schools, but of piano manufacturers, as well.

    Pianos from 50 years ago sound much better. Todays piano-makers have become more mechanical, producing pianos that are powerful but less sensitive, he said. For Leotta, the best pianos are those which yield the most beautiful, most sensitive sound, from the softest pianissimo to the loudest fortissimo.

    EXTRAORDINARY TALENTLEOTTA began lessons in piano at the age of 7 and furthered his studies at the Milan Conservatory under Mario Patuzzi, and is a former pupil of the acclaimed pianist Karl Ulrich Schnabel. Christian also studied at the Theo Lieven International Piano Foundation, and with Rosalyn Tureck at the Tureck Bach Research Foundation in Oxford, England.

    Leotta has collaborated with major orchestras, such as the Mnchner Philharmoniker, the Wiener Kammerorchester, the Italian RAI National Television Orchestra, and the Orchestra Sinfonica di MilanoGiuseppe Verdi(Symphony Orchest