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ARTS FACULTY COUNCIL Agenda Friday, March 2, 2012 1:00 – 4:00 Room B140 1) ADOPTION OF AGENDA PAGE Adopt the Arts Faculty Council Agenda for March 2, 2012 1 2) APPROVAL OF MINUTES Approve Arts Faculty Council Minutes of February 3, 2011 3 3) BUSINESS ARISING 4) GUESTS Indigenizing the Academy 5) DEANS REPORT 6) SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS 6.1 Senate Governance 6.2 Senate Budget 6.3 UEC 6.4 APPC 10 6.5 GSC 7) FOR DISCUSSION 7.1 Terms of Reference for Faculty and College Councils 11 7.2 College of Arts Council Terms of Reference 16 1
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ARTS FACULTY COUNCIL

Agenda

Friday, March 2, 2012

1:00 – 4:00 Room B140

1) ADOPTION OF AGENDA PAGE Adopt the Arts Faculty Council Agenda for March 2, 2012 1

2) APPROVAL OF MINUTES Approve Arts Faculty Council Minutes of February 3, 2011 3

3) BUSINESS ARISING 4) GUESTS

Indigenizing the Academy 5) DEANS REPORT 6) SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS

6.1 Senate Governance 6.2 Senate Budget 6.3 UEC 6.4 APPC 10 6.5 GSC

7) FOR DISCUSSION

7.1 Terms of Reference for Faculty and College Councils 11 7.2 College of Arts Council Terms of Reference 16

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7.3 Program and Course Approval Policy – Sylvie Murray 19 7.4 BC Aboriginal Post Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework 20

8) FOR DECISION 9) FOR INFORMATION

The following items were approved at Arts Faculty Curriculum Committee (AFCC) February 17, 2012

a) Course Revisions: 27 ANTH 210 GD 101 GD 154 GD 157 GD 161 GD 203 GD 204 GD 216 GD 231 GD 317 GD 369 GD 374

b) Course Revisions & Re-numbering: 64 GD 158 GD 358

c) New Courses: 72 GD 202 GD 361

d) New Course & Crosslist: 79 SOC 337/MACS 337

e) Pre-requisite changes: 84 ENGL 208

f) Revisions to the International Concentration (Geography) 87 g) KPE Minor for Arts and General Studies 88

Next Meeting: Friday, March 30, 2012

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DRAFT

Arts Faculty Council

DRAFT Minutes

Friday, February 3, 2012

1:00 – 4:00 PM Room B140 Present: Jacqueline Nolte (chair) Dana Landry John Pitcher Stephen Piper

Anne Franklin David Thomson Lesley Jessiman Steven Marsh Anna Wauthy Deborah Greenfield Linda Pardy Susan Fisher Annette Vogt Douglas Hudson Madeleine Hardin Sven Vande Wetering Benjamin Lorimer Edward Akuffo Marcella LaFever Sylvie Murray

Betty-Joan Traverse Elaine Newman Mary-Anne MacDougall Teresa Piper Brenda Fredrick Gayle Ramsden Michelle Rhodes Teresa Piper Bruce Kirkley Ghizlane Laghzaoui Michelle Riedlinger Tetsuomi Anzai

Chantelle Marlor Hamish Telford Rachael Letkeman (recorder) Cherish Forster Heather McAlpine Robin Anderson Trevor Carolan

Cheryl Dahl Irwin Cohen Robin Endelman Zoe Dennison Christine Elsey Jill Bain Samantha Pattridge Wayne Podrouzek Sean Parkinson Guests: Sydney Lamirand

Regrets: Prabhjot Parmar _______________________

1) ADOPTION OF AGENDA Z. Dennison / J. Bain

CARRIED The agenda for February 3, 2012 was adopted as presented 2) APPROVAL OF MINUTES R. Anderson / D. Thomson

CARRIED The Arts Faculty Council Minutes of November 25, 2011 were approved with the following amendment:

Item 7(d) Math requirement to be listed as MATH 141 or MATH 112 as opposed to MATH 141 or MATH 111

3) BUSINESS ARISING

J. Nolte welcomed new faculty member Leslie Jessiman to the Arts Faculty Council

a) Student Representatives – Election Results

Benjamin Lorimer and Anne Franklin were elected to the position for the remainder of the 2011/12 academic year

4) GUESTS

a) Curriculum Mapping – M. Rhodes

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DRAFT

Curriculum mapping was defined as a multi-stage process of identifying pathways within a program to meet a desired set of outcomes

Geography’s experience with curriculum mapping: o Began the process in 2008 (identified learning outcomes in 2008 and again in 2011) o Mapped first two years for both ‘sides’ of the department linking courses to outcomes and

identifying assignments. o Listed how each course met each learning outcome (or identified visible gaps) o Process in 2011-12: Re-examination of learning outcomes. This result focused less on

single skills and more on the big picture skillsets and abilities. Currently in the process of identifying how each 100-200 level course meets outcomes with ongoing plan to map 300-400 level courses in the summer.

Results of 2011-12 mapping: o Earlier skill concept and development needed in the program o Assumption of 1st year student abilities help explain some difficulties in 100-level courses o Identified a need to deliver 100-level courses differently – especially through problem

based learning o Preliminary discussion of curriculum changes (eg: greater quantitative requirements) o Able to identify learning outcomes that reflect desired departmental outcomes for their

own teaching, research and scholarship. Goals of this process were: identifying learning outcomes for the program, identifying gaps in

developing skills, finding areas of over-emphasis, sharing information on successful pedagogical and evaluation strategies and identifying areas where information is needed in course delivery

Advice and lessons learned: o Leave a lot of time to complete the process, plan on repeating, and prepare for not

everyone to “buy into it” o Make your list of learning outcomes a manageable size o Learning outcomes should influence pedagogy as well as content o Anticipate difficulties mapping outcomes for a whole program when many courses are

optional o Follow through on commitments to improve courses and curriculum – make the process

fit your departments goals

5) DEANS REPORT

A report was recently circulated in regards to a conference (Centre for Higher Education Research and Development) attended by several UFV administrators. A commitment from seven teaching intensive universities from BC and Alberta was agreed upon to continue meeting on a regular basis and finding ways to communicate what is being done well and what the importance of teaching focused institutions are.

A few of the presenters have been invited to the University of the Fraser Valley to present with a greater emphasis on community engaged research.

A commitment was made to working together on a faculty and student conference on community engaged research

6) SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS

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DRAFT

a) 6.1 Senate Governance

Revisions to the terms of reference to allow the College of Arts to function as one body (as opposed to two faculties) for the purpose of council meetings should be submitted to Senate for approval at the February 17, 2012 meeting.

Revisions to Senate Standing Committees’ Terms of Reference and membership will be

presented to Senate on February 17 – including: o Academic Planning and Priorities Committee: addition of three seats for faculty (non-

Senators), one staff position, one dean (or associate dean) o Addition of two faculty seats on the Graduate Studies Committee (from 5 to 7) o Addition of one faculty seat on the Senate Budget Committee (from 6 to 7) o Addition of one faculty seat on the Senate Governance Committee (from 3 to 4) o Addition of one faculty seat on UEC (from 8 to 9) o Allow the Librarian to name a designate on APPC and UEC; addition of the University

Librarian (or designated Librarian) as a voting member on the Graduate Studies Committee; and as an ex-officio non-voting member on the Research Committee

The definition of faculty and staff will be on the February 17, 2012 Senate agenda with the following request from Senate Governance:

o “That Senate direct the Senate Governance Committee to explore the issues raised by

the Academic Support Faculty in relation to their role in Senate Governance”

b) 6.2 Senate Budget A budget principles document was presented to Arts Faculty Council highlighting items such as

zero growth funding and a summary of budget changes for the fiscal year April 1, 2012-March 31, 2013

No additional funding will be issued with the exception of revenue generated by UFV. Currently UFV has a funding shortfall for the coming year of approximately $740,000.

Finance has projected that needs of the university can be met while operating at 105% of the ministry FTE target

c) 6.3 UEC

The new Practical Nursing diploma as well as several new courses were approved at Februarys UEC meeting

Option A special admission requests will now be handled through Admissions & Records Special transfer credit requests will come to UEC – for example: transfer credit from non-

recognized institutions Honours Framework: UEC has agreed that an honours degree does not need to be more than

120 credits – different options for setting this up will be sent out d) 6.4 APPC

Discussed the honours policy and provided feedback to UEC Recently completed the APPC evaluation grid Discussed policy framework related the process by which new undergraduate and graduate

programs will be developed.

e) 6.5 GSC Currently revising general regulations for graduate studies GSC also had some discussion around the APPC grid (see agenda item 7b for further detail)

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DRAFT

7) FOR DISCUSSION

a) Learning Outcomes A roundtable discussion recently took place to determine what the most flexible and

comprehensive science requirements would be. Two documents were circulated – one that has been adopted by DQAB and the other is a

document that was used by a private educational foundation. The roundtable group discussed the two frameworks and based on consensus have decided to work with the Canadian Council of Education document and supplement this with the Lumina report.

A refined document will be posted on the web shortly, in an abbreviated format Timeframe for developing learning outcomes will be a lengthy process. There is no specific time

line but the goal is to create a document that the College of Arts has complete faith in. The College of Arts must have a set of accountability measures, or risk having measures

imposed ACTION: J. Nolte has asked for re-wording suggestions for item (8a) on the learning outcomes document

b) Program Prioritization Criteria The APPC standing committee for Senate has been putting together a grid to rank new programs

(not certificates or diplomas – new majors and new major programs only) in terms of which programs they recommend to senate should be implemented first, second third, etc. The ranking is of programs that have already been developed and that have received full approval from UEC or GEC. The grid displayed at the Arts Faculty Council meeting is to be used as a way of determining how to rank the programs

APPC members acknowledged the grid was a work in progress. After a period of time, the grid will be re-evaluated in terms of the weighting of the criteria and whether some criteria need to be added/changed/deleted. An update will definitely be required after the Institutional Learning Objectives have been determined. APPC is currently in the process of discussing how prioritization will happen e.g.: once a year, twice a year etc.

APPC will rank the programs using the grid in conjunction with the Budget committee’s report on estimated costs of the program.

AFC members raised questions about whether a number system (i.e. points) or non-number system should be used to evaluate stronger programs vs. weaker ones. In response to this, Cheryl Dahl reported that the grid was tested with four strong, fully-developed new degree programs and all received similar scores. What became clear from this test was which areas a program exceeded expectations and where it was a little thin; each program had different strengths and weaknesses, even though they received the same general score. This suggests that the scoring system should not create too big of a problem for programs that do not meet all criteria listed in the grid and yet are strong programs.

AFC members suggested changes be made to the title of the grid and to the opening paragraph on the grid so as to clarify the use of the grid. ACTION:

o C. Dahl to bring the grid back to APPC for revisions to the title and introductory paragraph

o S. Piper has asked that AFC members with specific suggestions to e-mail Sylvie Murray, Chantelle Marlor or Cheryl Dahl

c) Honours Degree Framework

Honours Degree Framework has gone to the Academic Planning and Priorities Committee and was brought back to UEC for further discussion at the February 3, 2012 meeting

Most UEC members were dissatisfied that an honours degree required additional credits based on other programs stating otherwise

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DRAFT

UEC has agreed and moved that an honours can consist of either additional credits up to twelve or a specified concentration of upper level credits. This amendment will be brought forward to Senate

This framework is a general framework for the entire institution and is meant to set out minimum requirements. UEC felt that it was important not to limit the framework to 120 credits.

Each proposal for an honours degree will need to be approved through UEC and each area of study will have the opportunity to propose their programs in a manner that allows them to remain competitive.

8) FOR INFORMATION

Revisions to the Extended Minor in Anthropology were approved via e-mail vote during the month of December

The following items were approved at Arts Faculty Curriculum Committee (AFCC) December 9, 2011 and

January 20, 2012):

a) New Courses: CRIM 216 CRIM 440 CRIM 441 CRIM 442 GEOG 314 GEOG 491 HIST 316 POSC 305 POSC 365 POSC 410 THEA 290 THEA 295

b) Six Year Course Reviews: CMNS 180 CMNS 312 CMNS 385/ENGL 385 CMNS 335 CMNS 532 CRIM 310 CRIM 311 CRIM 320 CRIM 330 CRIM 335 CRIM 410 CRIM 411 CRIM 412 CRIM 415 CRIM 416 CRIM 417 CRIM 421 CRIM 450 CRIM 480 CSM 104

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DRAFT

CSM 108 GEOG 445 VA 372 VA 471 VA 472

c) Course revision and crosslist: MACS 369/JRNL 369

d) Course Revisions a. CMNS 115 b. CMNS 375 FD 382 FD 384 GD 156 GD 203 GD 204 GD 231 HIST 101 HIST 105 HIST 115 HIST 235 HIST 236 HIST 300 HIST 324 HIST 330 HIST 370 HIST 385 HIST 420 HIST 457 HIST 458 HIST 460 POSC 100 POSC 110 POSC 120 POSC 310 THEA 199 THEA 299 THEA 399 THEA 499

* POSC course outlines with revisions will be added at a later date.

e) Prerequisite Changes: a. CMNS 125 b. CMNS 155 c. CMNS 175 d. CMNS 380 e. CMNS 353 f. CMNS 420 g. CMNS 430 h. CRIM 281

f) Numbering Changes: HIST 317 VA 251

g) Revisions to the Visual Arts Certificate in Extended Studies h) Revisions to the Communications Minor

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DRAFT

i) Revisions to the Journalism Certificate j) Revisions to the Professional Communication Essentials Certificate k) History calendar changes l) Political Science calendar changes m) Changes to the Fashion Design entrance requirements and application process n) Theatre Calendar Changes o) Changes to English Honours application procedure p) Changes to pre-requisites for upper-level creative writing courses q) Revisions to the Geography major and major concentrations (BA); Geography Honours (BA) r) Revisions to the Graphic & Digital Design Diploma

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 APPC report to AFC by Sylvie Murray, February 23, 2012  Program Prioritization and Ranking:   The following revisions to the Program Evaluation Grid (made by Cheryl Dahl, Chantelle Marlor, Sylvie Murray, and Jacqueline Nolte) were accepted at the Feb 22 meeting, following AFC’s recommendations.   1. Change the name of the grid from 'Program Evaluation Grid' to ‘Program Ranking Grid’ to clarify that 

it is used for ranking of completed proposals for possible implementation and not used for approval of programs for conceptual development.  

2. Under ‘Quality of the proposal’, change the first sentence to read ’proposals must be recommended for approval to Senate by either UEC or GSC’.  

3.  Change the introductory paragraph to read as follow:  The Academic Planning and Priorities Committee uses this grid as a guide for assessing potential new programs in terms of how well they exhibit UFV‐established priorities, including those set out in the Strategic Plan. Given that programs must have already been recommended for approval by UEC or GSC before reaching this point, it is assumed that all the proposed programs at this stage are meritorious, that is, that they have met both UFV Learning Outcomes and the standards set out in the proposal template. The goal at this stage is for APPC members to evaluate which of these meritorious program proposals should be ranked higher when considered for implementation. This grid is meant as a guide for discussion, to ensure that all important issues are considered. The budget analysis prepared by the Budget Committee should be considered in conjunction with this grid.  The Program Ranking Grid can be viewed on the APPC’s website: http://www.ufv.ca/senate/Senate_Standing_Committees/APPC.htm  

 

Criteria/process for program reduction: 

APPC also clarified that the Program Ranking Grid will be used to rank new programs only; a distinct 

process will have to be determined in the case of program reduction. APPC has asked Academic 

Administrators to suggest criteria to assist in program reduction decisions.    

 

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UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY

TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF

FACULTIES AND COLLEGE COUNCILS

1. PREAMBLE

In accordance with the University Act of British Columbia, c. 468 RSBC (1996) faculties of

universities are required to make rules for the governance, direction and management of their

affairs and to ensure that such affairs are conducted with representation from their

membership.

1.1. ESTABLISHMENT OF FACULTY COUNCILS

In accordance with the University Act and with the amended University Act, 2008,

faculty councils are hereby established as the senior academic governance bodies of the

faculties at the University of the Fraser Valley, and each council shall be responsible for

its faculty’s respective governance and management of academic affairs.

1.2. ESTABLISHMENT OF COLLEGE COUNCILS

Two or more faculties within the same college may resolve to meet jointly on an ongoing

basis, thereby establishing a college council. Faculties that meet jointly as a college

council shall comply with the rules and procedures set out in Section 3 (Structure and

Function of College Councils).

Rules and procedures set out in Section 2 (Structure and Function of Faculty Councils)

shall not apply to those faculties comprising the college council.

2. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF FACULTY COUNCILS

2.1. MANDATE

Faculty Councils shall:

a) serve as the forum for sharing information and the discussion of academic matters;

b) receive recommendations related to academic programs, including but not limited

to the development of new programs, program changes, new courses, and

discontinuation of courses;

c) vote on recommendations as related to the above;

d) transmit recommendations to Senate;

e) pass policies related to the functioning of the faculty council; and

f) deal with matters assigned by the Board or Senate.

2.2. MEMBERSHIP

2.2.1. Voting Membership

Voting membership of the faculty council shall be comprised of the following

from each faculty:

a) faculty members;

b) student representatives elected by students in the faculty - number to be

determined by the dean, in consultation with the faculty council, normally

for one year;

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c) academic advisors (if any) employed within the faculty;

d) two support staff representatives employed within the faculty, elected by

support staff, for a two-year term;

e) a maximum of two sessional instructor representatives, elected by sessional

instructors, for a one-year term;

f) Dean of the faculty;

g) President;

h) Departments which offer a major(s) that may be taken as part of a degree

program in another faculty will have two designated representatives in that

faculty council, with full voting rights in the faculty council, except that

they may not stand for election to Senate, or vote to elect a senator as

member of that faculty council.

2.2.2. Ex-Officio and Non-voting Members

Non-voting membership:

a) Secretary to the Faculty Council;

b) Provost and Vice-President Academic;

c) University Secretary/Registrar;

d) one member of Senate;

e) one representative each from other Faculty Councils;

f) those invited by the Dean in consultation with the Faculty Council;

g) University Librarian or designate.

2.3. FACULTY BUSINESS

Faculty business will normally be carried out at regularly scheduled council meetings

where there is a quorum. The faculty council has the right to delegate business to

standing committees and ad hoc committees, which may make recommendations to the

council for consideration. The dean of the faculty or designate will assume the role of

chair on these committees, until such time as a chair may be elected by the committee.

a) Standing Committees – will report to the faculty council. Standing committees will

consist of faculty council members elected by the council and members appointed

by the dean to a maximum of 50% of the committee members. Members appointed

by the dean need not be members of the faculty council. The dean is a non-voting

ex-officio member of all standing committees.

b) Ad Hoc Committees – may be struck by the faculty council for specific purposes

and dissolved upon completion of task.

2.4. QUORUM

A quorum will consist of at least twenty percent (20%) of the voting members of

council.

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2.5. CHAIR AND VICE-CHAIR

The dean of the faculty shall serve as chair of its faculty. . A chair and vice-chair of

council meetings may be elected by the council using the faculty’s nomination and

election procedure. The chair and vice-chair will be elected for a two-year term.

2.6. AGENDA AND MINUTES

a) Council’s agenda will be set by the dean and chair or vice-chair of council

meetings, in consultation with the University Secretary/Registrar and the members

of the faculty council;

b) Minutes will be kept by a secretary appointed by the dean;

c) Agenda, minutes, and written reports will be circulated to council members at least

twenty-four hours prior to meetings, though normally council members will be

given at least seven days’ advance notice on voting matters.

2.7. MEETING TIMES

Meetings will be held at least three times per year. Notwithstanding, the dean, in

consultation with the chair or vice-chair, has the right to call a council meeting at any

time if there is urgent business that requires the attention of the council.

2.8. REVIEW OF TERMS OF REFERENCE

The terms of reference shall be reviewed at least every two years.

3. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF COLLEGE COUNCILS

3.1. MANDATE

College Councils shall:

a) serve as the forum for sharing information and the discussion of academic matters;

b) receive recommendations related to academic programs, including but not limited

to: development of new programs, program changes, new courses, and

discontinuation of courses;

c) vote on recommendations as related to the above;

d) transmit recommendations to Senate;

e) pass policies related to the functioning of the college council, and

f) deal with matters assigned by the Board or Senate.

3.2. MEMBERSHIP

3.2.1. Voting Membership

Voting membership of the college council shall be comprised of the following

from the college:

a) faculty members in the college;

b) student representatives elected by students in the faculties of the college,

number to be determined by the dean, in consultation with the college

council, normally for one year;

c) academic advisors (if any) employed within the college;

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d) four support staff representatives employed within the college, elected by

support staff for a two-year term;

e) a maximum of two sessional instructor representatives, elected by sessional

instructors for a one-year term;

f) Dean of the college;

g) Associate deans of the college;

h) President;

i) Departments which offer a major(s) that may be taken as part of a degree

program in another faculty will have two designated representatives in that

college council, with full voting rights in the college council, except that

they may not stand for election to Senate or vote to elect a senator as

member of that college council.

3.2.2. Ex-Officio and Non-voting Members

Non-voting membership:

a) Secretary to the College Council;

b) Provost and Vice-President, Academic;

c) University Secretary/Registrar;

d) one member of Senate;

e) one representative each from other faculty and college councils;

f) those invited by the dean, in consultation with the college council;

g) University Librarian or designate.

3.3. COLLEGE BUSINESS

College business will normally be carried out at regularly scheduled council meetings

where there is a quorum. The college council has the right to delegate business to

standing committees and ad hoc committees, which may make recommendations to the

council for consideration. The dean of the college or designate will assume the role of

chair on these committees, until such time as a chair may be elected by the committee.

a) Standing Committees – will report to the college council. Standing committees

will consist of college council members elected by the council and members

appointed by the dean to a maximum of 50% of the committee members. Members

appointed by the dean need not be members of the college council. The dean is a

non-voting ex-officio member of all standing committees.

b) Ad Hoc Committees – may be struck by the college council for specific purposes

and dissolved upon completion of task.

3.4. QUORUM

A quorum will consist of at least twenty percent (20%) of the voting members of

Council.

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3.5. CHAIR AND VICE-CHAIR

The dean of the college shall serve as chair of its college. A chair and vice-chair of the

council meetings may be elected by the council, using the college’s nomination and

election procedure. The chair and vice chair will be elected for a two-year term.

3.6. AGENDA AND MINUTES

a) Council’s agenda will be set by the dean and chair or vice-chair of council

meetings, in consultation with the University Secretary/Registrar and the members

of the council;

b) Minutes will be kept by a secretary appointed by the dean;

c) Agenda, minutes, and written reports will be circulated to council members at least

twenty-four hours prior to meetings, though normally council members will be

given at least seven days’ advance notice on voting matters.

3.7. MEETING TIMES

Meetings will be held at least three times per year. Notwithstanding, the dean, in

consultation with the chair or vice-chair, has the right to call a council meeting at any

time if there is urgent business that requires the attention of the council.

3.8. REVIEW OF TERMS OF REFERENCE

The terms of reference shall be reviewed at least every two years.

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UNIVERSITY OF THE FRASER VALLEY

TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE

COLLEGE OF ARTS COUNCIL

1. Preamble

In accordance with the University Act of British Columbia, c. 468 RSBC (1996) faculties of

universities are required to make rules for the governance, direction and management of their affairs

and to ensure that such affairs are conducted with representation from their membership. In

accordance with the Act and with the University of the Fraser Valley Terms of References for the

Structure and Function of Faculties and College Councils, the College of Arts shall have a College

council referred to as the College of Arts Council (CAC).

2. Establishment of College Councils

In accordance with the University Act and with the University Amendment Act, 2008, the College of

Arts Council is hereby established as the senior academic governance body of the College of Arts at

the University of the Fraser Valley. The CAC shall be responsible for the governance and

management of academic affairs of the College of Arts. The College of Arts comprises the Faculty of

Humanities and the Faculty of Social Sciences, which resolve to meet jointly on an ongoing basis,

thereby establishing the College of Arts Council.

3. Mandate

The CAC shall:

(a) serve as the forum for sharing information and the discussion of academic matters;

(b) receive recommendations related to academic programs, including but not limited to:

development of new programs, program changes, new courses, course changes, and

discontinuation of courses;

(c) vote on recommendations as related to the above;

(d) transmit recommendations to senate;

(e) pass policies related to the functioning of the CAC;

(f) deal with matters assigned by the Board or Senate.

4. Membership

4.1 Voting Membership

(a) all Type B Faculty in the College of Arts;

(b) two student representatives elected by students in the College of Arts;

(c) academic advisors employed within the college;

(d) four support staff representatives employed within the College of Arts, elected by

support staff for a two-year term;

(e) two College of Arts sessional instructor representatives, elected by College of Arts

sessional instructors for a one-year term;

(f) Senior Advisor on Indigenous Affairs;

(g) Director of the Centre for IndoCanadian Studies;

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(h) The Dean of the College of Arts;

(i) The Associate Deans of the College of Arts;

(j) The President of the university;

(k) Departments which offer a major(s) that may be taken as part of a degree program in

the College of Arts will have two designated representatives in the College of Arts

Council, with full voting rights in the college council, except that they may not

stand for election to Senate or vote to elect senators as members of the College

Council;

(l) A maximum of 10 individuals granted full College Council membership for a period

of one year by a majority vote of the College Council. Such members shall have

full voting rights in the College Council, except that they may not stand for

election to Senate or vote to elect senators as members of the College Council.

4.2 Ex-Officio and Non-voting Members

(a) the Secretary to the AFC;

(b) the Vice-President Academic and Provost;

(c) the University Secretary/Registrar;

(d) one representative each from other faculty and college councils;

(e) one representative from the Writing Centre;

(f) University Librarian or designate;

(g) those invited by the Dean in consultation with the College Council.

5. College Business

College business will normally be carried out at regularly scheduled Council meetings where there is

a quorum. The CAC has the right to delegate business to standing committees and ad hoc

committees, which may make recommendations to the Council for consideration. The Dean of the

College or designate will assume the role of chair on these committees, until such time as a chair may

be elected by the committee.

5.1 Standing Committees – Standing committees will report to the College Council.

Standing committees will consist of CAC members elected by the Council and members

appointed by the Dean to a maximum of 50% minus one of the committee members.

Members appointed by the Dean need not be members of the CAC. The Dean or delegate is a

non-voting ex-officio member of all standing committees.

5.2 Ad Hoc Committees – may be struck by the CAC for specific purposes and dissolved

upon completion of task.

6. Quorum

A quorum will consist of at least twenty five voting members of Council.

7. Chair and Vice-Chair

The Dean of the College shall serve as Chair of the College. A Chair and Vice-Chair of College

Council meetings may be elected by the Council using the College’s nomination and election

procedures. The Chair and Vice-Chair will be elected for a two-year term.

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8. Agenda and Minutes

(a) Council’s agenda will be set by the Dean and Chair or Vice-Chair in consultation

with the University Secretary/Registrar and the members of the Council.

(b) Minutes will be kept by a secretary appointed by the Dean.

(c) Agenda, minutes and written reports will be circulated to Council members at least

twenty-four hours prior to meetings, though normally Council members will be

given at least seven days advance notice on voting matters.

9. Meeting Times

The CAC will determine the frequency of its meetings. However, meetings will be held at least three

times per year. Notwithstanding, the Dean, in consultation with the chair or vice-chair, has the right

to call a Council meeting at any time if there is urgent business that requires the attention of the

Council.

10. Review of Terms of Reference

These Terms of Reference shall be reviewed at least every two years.

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Course and Program Approval Policies (Graduate and Undergraduate) 

At its December 14, 2011 meeting, APPC reviewed the Undergraduate Program and Course Approval 

Policy forwarded by the Undergraduate Education Committee (UEC) and raised a number of questions 

for further examination. A subcommittee made of representatives of UEC, GSC (Graduate Studies 

Committee), APPC, the program development coordinator, and the original policy group was formed to 

review these policies (members are Samantha Pattridge, Cheryl Dahl, Maria Bos‐chan, Sue Brigden, 

Sylvie Murray and Noham Weinberg). APPC also expressed its wish that graduate and undergraduate 

program and course approval policies be parallel. GSC has since then completed revisions to the policy 

for graduate courses and programs; the subcommittee is now looking at the two policies with the view 

of reconciling differences between the two.  

The most substantial revision to the program approval process for both graduate and undergraduate 

courses that the subcommittee will be recommending to APPC and Senate (hopefully at the March and 

May meetings, respectively) relates to the role of the Deans and democratic bodies (Faculty Councils 

and Senate). The recommendation will be that, at two key stages in the process of program 

development (the presentation of a concept paper and of the full proposal), authority to approve or 

stop a proposal will be given to the democratic bodies, not the Dean. The Dean will have the 

responsibility to “review and recommend” a concept paper and full proposal to Faculty Council; it is 

understood that a recommendation could be positive and negative. This would represent a change in 

our current practice. We welcome AFC’s thoughts on the implications of this proposed change.  

APPC has also mandated the subcommittee “to consider a stream‐lined approval process for certificates 

and diploma programs to permit greater flexibility in responding to emerging needs in our communities” 

(APPC approved minutes, 2012 01 25).  

 

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B R I T I S H C O L U M B I A ’ S A B O R I G I N A L P O S T - S E C O N D A R Y E D U C A T I O N A N D T R A I N I N G P O L I C Y F R A M E W O R K 2 0 2 0 V I S I O N F O R T H E F U T U R E VISION The framework vision is:

Aboriginal learners succeed in an integrated, relevant, and effective British Columbia post-secondary education system that enhances their participation in the social, cultural and economic life of their communities, the province, and global society. CONTINUING COMMITMENTS The framework recognizes the commitments previously made by the Government of British Columbia, First Nations, and the Métis Nation BC, including:

• A New Relationship between the provincial government and First Nations that is government-to-government and is based on respect, recognition and accommodation of Aboriginal title and rights. • The Transformative Change Accord signed in November 2005 by the Government of British Columbia, British Columbia First Nations and the Government of Canada, “to achieve the goals of closing the social and economic gap between First Nations and other British Columbians over the next 10 years ... and of establishing a new relationship based upon mutual respect and recognition.” • The Métis Nation Relationship Accord signed in May 2006 by the Government of British Columbia and the Métis Nation of British Columbia, to work towards closing the gap on the quality of life between Métis people and other British Columbians. • The British Columbia Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Partners Group’s

Memorandum of Understanding on Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training, which reflects the Partners’ intention to collectively build on successes to date, identify needs, and implement strategies to improve the success of Aboriginal post-secondary learners in British Columbia 20

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PRINCIPLES The framework will be guided by the following principles: 1. Recognition and support for the right of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples to self-determination and the role of post-secondary education in facilitating and supporting self-determination. 2. An acknowledgement of and respect for the diverse histories, languages, cultures, values, ways of knowing, and knowledge systems of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, and recognition that the post-secondary system has a role in sharing this understanding with all British Columbians. 3. An affirmation that First Nations, Métis and Inuit languages and cultures are critical components of quality educational programming and are essential to support the success of Aboriginal learners. 4. Recognition that First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples are in the best position to inform the development of and decision-making around post-secondary education programs, policies and services for First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, working collaboratively within existing governance structures. 5. A commitment to informed leadership, shared responsibility, effective practices, and meaningful accountability for measurable outcomes in relation to Aboriginal learner success and systemic change within public post-secondary institutions. 6. Recognition of the unique, vital and complementary roles of Aboriginal-controlled post-secondary institutes and public post-secondary institutions in serving the needs of Aboriginal learners. 7. Support for successful transitions for Aboriginal learners throughout the lifelong learning continuum, and between public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal-controlled post-secondary institutes. 8. Support for innovative and flexible approaches to meet the needs of the diversity of Aboriginal learners in British Columbia’s post-secondary education system. 9. Recognition that the work needed to achieve systemic change is significant and will take time, thus long term investments are required to ensure programs, policies and services that meet the needs of Aboriginal learners are systemic, strategic and sustainable.

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Last Updated

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GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES Goal 1: Systemic change means that the public post-secondary education system is relevant, responsive, respectful and receptive to Aboriginal learners and communities and relationships between public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal communities are based on mutual respect. Objective 1.1: Aboriginal voice is an integral part of the public post-secondary education system.

Strategies 1. Work with public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal communities and organizations to increase Aboriginal voice in institutional governance and leadership, including but not limited to institutional boards of governors. 2. Support public post-secondary institutions to partner with Aboriginal communities to explore opportunities to encourage more Aboriginal learners to enter graduate studies. 3. Continue to support the Aboriginal Post-Secondary Coordinators to meet to share leading practices regarding supports for Aboriginal learners. Objective 1.2 Public post-secondary institutions work in partnership and collaboration with Aboriginal communities, organizations and institutes to create the systemic change needed for public post-secondary institutions to support First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples’ success.

Strategies 1. Phase in the implementation of Aboriginal Service Plans in all public post-secondary institutions, ensuring that the Aboriginal Service Plans are developed, maintained and monitored on an ongoing basis in partnership and collaboration with Aboriginal communities, organizations and institutes in order to support initiatives that: a. increase access and success, including programming delivered in Aboriginal communities; b. increase the receptivity and relevance of post-secondary programming and services; and c. strengthen partnerships and collaboration. 2. Ensure that capital projects at public post-secondary institution campuses incorporate culturally welcoming places for Aboriginal learners and communities, and that Aboriginal learners and communities are involved in the design and use of these places.. 3. Support student housing projects at public post-secondary institutions in rural and smaller urban areas, with an emphasis on serving Aboriginal learners and their families.

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Goal 2: Community-based delivery of programs is supported through partnerships between public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal institutes and communities. Objective 2.1: British Columbia public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal institutes and communities partner in the delivery of community-based programs for Aboriginal learners.

Strategies 1. Provide funding for partnerships between public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal institutes and communities to deliver programs in Aboriginal communities that meet community needs and position Aboriginal communities to take advantage of economic opportunities. 2. Support Aboriginal learners to access distance and online education opportunities in their communities. 3. Promote reciprocal1 partnerships between public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal institutes and communities by sharing the Post-Secondary Education Partnership Agreement Toolkit developed by the Indigenous Adult and Higher Learning Association, the University of Victoria, and the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology with both public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal institutes. Objective 2.2: Aboriginal institutes have a unique and critical role in British Columbia's post-secondary system to increase Aboriginal learner participation and completion in post-secondary education.

Strategies 1. Exempt on-reserve First Nations institutes from the Private Career Training Institutions Act. 2. Work with Aboriginal institutes and public post-secondary institutions to support effective models that ensure the recognition of program quality and transfer and articulation of courses and programs. 3. Work with the Federal Government to explore mechanisms to mutually support Aboriginal institutes. Objective 2.3: Aboriginal adult education programs enable Aboriginal learners to transition to post-secondary education and employment.

Strategies 1. Undertake a needs and gap analysis of Aboriginal adult education programs, policies and services. 2. Work with partners to support Aboriginal adult education program development and leading practices in assessment and benchmarking. 1 Reciprocal partnerships are respectful and mutually beneficial to both parties.

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Goal 3: Financial barriers to accessing and completing post-secondary education and training are reduced for Aboriginal learners. Objective 3.1: Financial supports to access and complete post-secondary education and training are available to Aboriginal learners who need them. (Links to principles 2, 8 and 9)

Strategies 1. Establish an Aboriginal Emergency Assistance Fund, to provide emergency relief funds to Aboriginal learners attending British Columbia post-secondary institutions. 2. Continue to build and support the British Columbia Aboriginal Student Award, which was established as an endowment by the Ministry and is administered by the Irving K. Barber British Columbia Scholarship Society, and develop strategies to encourage additional investment by industry. 3. Promote and raise awareness of financial support programs for Aboriginal post-secondary learners. 4. Continue to advocate that the federal government improve post-secondary education funding for Aboriginal learners. Goal 4: Aboriginal learners transition seamlessly from K-12 to post-secondary education. Objective 4.1: Teachers support Aboriginal learner success in the K-12 system.

Strategies 1. Increase the number of Aboriginal teachers for the elementary and secondary system through financial support to Aboriginal learners enrolled in teacher education programs, including First Nations language teacher programs. 2. Work with First Nation and post-secondary partners to increase the number of First Nation language teachers. 3. Work with Aboriginal K-12 Partners and the Association of BC Deans of Education to support initiatives that better equip all teachers to meet the needs of Aboriginal learners in the K-12 system. Objective 4.2: Aboriginal learners and their families have information and are better supported to make choices for their transition from K-12 to post-secondary and the labour market.

Strategies 1. Work with the Ministry of Education and Aboriginal K-12 and post-secondary partners, Band Education and School Education Counsellors to provide K-12 students and their families in public and First Nation schools with career and educational planning tools and resources to enable them to make informed choices that will support their transition to post-secondary education and the labour market. 25

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2. Promote existing best practices in supporting K-12 to post-secondary transitions, such as dual credit programs. Goal 5: Continuous improvement is based on research, data-tracking and sharing of leading practices. Objective 5.1: Sharing of leading practices creates an environment of informed leadership, effective practices and results in Aboriginal post-secondary education.

Strategies 1. Work with Aboriginal post-secondary education partners to facilitate the sharing of leading practices, research, information, and events to support Aboriginal learner success via the AVED website, social media, Aboriginal and post-secondary communication networks, and by hosting an annual forum.

Objective 5.2: Governments, Aboriginal institutes and public post-secondary institutions make evidence-based decisions with respect to Aboriginal post-secondary education.

Strategies 1. Develop data collection processes and data sharing agreements in collaboration with Aboriginal institutes and public post-secondary institutions in order to report regularly on progress and outcomes. 2. Expand the use of Personal Education Numbers to identify learners enrolled in programs delivered in partnership with Aboriginal institutes in order to better understand and respond to learner pathways. 3. Undertake research – in partnership with public post-secondary institutions and Aboriginal communities and institutes – to test best practices in Aboriginal post-secondary education, beginning with K-12 to post-secondary, and post-secondary to labour market transition points.

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To AFCC, This is a course review for approval at the next AFCC meeting on January 20: ANTH 210: Gender and Sexuality across Cultures. This course was approved on December 15, 2011 by the SCMS Department (of which Anthropology is a part) and is currently going through the pre-UEC consultation process.

Updates were made to the Course Descriptive Title, Calendar Description; Learning Outcomes, and Course Content sections. Attached is the Official Course Outline.Thank you for your time.Janice

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

ANTH 210 SCMS 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Gender and Kinship Gender and Sexuality across Cultures COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

The most fundamental distinction in all societies is that of gender. There are many similarities and differences in the way that this relationship is organized across cultures. In this course, we explore the nature of social relationships between/among genders, their reliance on particular ideas about femininity and masculinity, their importance to sexuality, the body, and group identity, and the cultural frameworks, stereotypes, inequalities, and misunderstandings that often accompany them. Taking an ethnographic and feminist approach, and emphasizing the everyday, we examine the connections between gender, family, kinship, economy, politics, religion, ethnicity, race, and class.This course introduces the major forms of kinship and descent across cultures and considers both the central place of women and the theorization of gender in the contemporary study of the family. Taking an ethnographic and feminist approach, the relationships between kinship, gender, economy, politics, religion, ethnicity, race, and class are examined, and notions of femininity and masculinity, honour and shame, and sexuality and the body are deconstructed. Students will be encouraged to make linkages between theory, literature, and personal experience. Disciplinary focus: ANTH/SOC.

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 102 or SOC 101. COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 45 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 30 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 15 Hrs Laboratory: Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 36 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: every other year Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2001 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: May 2018 (six years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Nicola Mooney

Department Head: Stephen Piper Date approved: December 15, 201

Supporting area consultation (Pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 3, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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ANTH 210 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand and explain a number of cross-cultural kinship and gender formations, and their relationships to

social roles, labour, property, ritual, ethnicity, race, and class explain the importance of feminist anthropology to the reformulation of kinship studies in late twentieth century

anthropology explain gender variance and its relationships to sexuality, the body, and social norms recognize the gendered dimensions of ‘other’ aspects of culture (e.g. state, media, history, power) and assess

their meanings appreciate contemporary debates concerning gender equality/difference express and use an effective vocabulary of anthropological concepts used in the study of gender, sexuality,

and kinship apply the theoretical and ethnographic literatures of the course to personal experience demonstrate an understanding of gender, sexuality, and related concepts through reading, writing, discussion,

presentation, review/analysis, and the completion of a research assignment or project METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures, discussion, film/multimedia, and student presentations. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify): Methods will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective. Caroline Brettel and Carolyn Sargent, eds. (Pearson, 2009, 5E). Kinship and Gender: An Introduction. Linda Stone (Westview Press, 2009, 4E). Women and Men: Cultural Constructs of Gender. Nancy Bonvillain (Pearson, 2007, 4E) SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

Quizzes and tests 30% Kinship chart and auto-ethnography 15% Presentation 5% Essay outline 10% Essay 25% Participation/discussion 15% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

1. Issues and Approaches (Sex vs. Gender, Sociobiology, Marxism/Materialism, Feminism, and Ethnographic Relativism) [Two weeks]

2. Gender Dichotomies (Man the Hunter/Woman the Gatherer, Nature/Culture, Domestic/Public) 3. The Family (Forms, Functions, Meanings, Classifications) 4. Kinship and Descent (Matrilineality, Patrilineality, Bilaterality) 5. The Sex/Gender of Work (Household, Sexual Division of Labour, Kin/Gender Roles in relation to Economics and Politics) 6. Rituals and Representations of Gender 7. Bodies and Sexualities (Reproduction, Honour and Shame, Double Standards) 8. The Construction of Gender (Masculinities, Femininities, and Gender Variance) 9. Gender and Difference (Ethnicity, Race, Class)

10. Gender and State (Colonialism, Nationalism, Modernity) 11. Gender Transformations, Transgressions, and Resistances

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Graphic and Digital Design Course Rationale

Revisions of Graphic Design courses have been undertaken in order to accommodate the re-launch of the Graphic and Digital Design diploma on the Mission campus this September. A consultant was hired to review both the structure of the program and the efficacy of individual courses. Attached revisions reflect both the input of the consultant and the work of the Visual Arts Program Committee (which oversees Graphic and Digital Design).

The main structural/content shift in the program (and thus in the courses as well) was to implement enhanced digital content. Changes to course titles, descriptions, and learning outcomes form the backbone of this shift. In some cases, numbering was also changed to improve flow. Two new courses were added and one 200-level course was advanced to the 300-level.

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 101 College of Arts – Visual Arts 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Introduction to the Graphic Design EnvironmentFundamentals of Design COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course begins with an introduction to the practice of graphic and digital design, progressingand then moves into the fundamentals of design. Students will explore critical thinking, elements and principles of design, and the basics of typography. This course is an overview of the graphics industry and how the designer fits within it. Students will explore the capabilities of the leading graphic design software in relation to the industry for which they are creating their design. Basic understanding of the Mac and PC platforms will be learned as well as processes and materials used in the field.

PREREQUISITES: Admission to the Graphic Design Program, or permission of instructorNone COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 4560 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 2930 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: Hrs Laboratory: 615 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: 1015 Hrs Maximum enrolment: 3024 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Once per year Other (specify): Critique Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: January 2000 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Graphic Design Faculty

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 101 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Comprehend the graphic design industry--current and historical. Compare and analyse graphic design software. Recite industry terminology. Breakdown and explain industry workflow. Identify and explain materials and processes. Setup a computer.Define graphic design as a discipline Identify notable design movements from the 19th and 20th century Describe how economic, political and social contexts contribute to design Analyze the principles, elements and formal structures in design Demonstrate composition, principles and elements of design in applied projects

METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Demonstrations Presentations Field trips Lecture Demonstration using Proxima projection. Field Trips. Guest Speakers. Audiovisual Material. Library Research. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Lupton, E. & Cole Phillips, J. Graphic Design The New Basics. Princeton Architectural Press, NY. 2008.

Hollis, R. Graphic Design, A Concise History, 2nd Ed. New York: Thames & Hudson, 2005.

Ambrose, Gavin; and Harris, Paul. The fundamentals of graphic design 2nd Ed. AVA Academia, 200911.

Landa, Robin. Graphic Design Solutions, 4th Ed. Clark Baxter, 2011.

Pocket Pal by International Paper Staff ISBN 0614255236 SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Computer and Software.Adobe CS 5.5 Master Collectioncurrent edition Computer Flash drive STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

15% Project 1: Principles and elements, Pattern and ornament 35% Project 2: Principles and elements, Analysis of isms 25% Project 3: Social responsibility, Great ideas 25% Project 4: Design of Dissent Small Assignments 20% Journals/Short Essays 20%

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Short Review Quizzes 20% Mid-term Exam 20% Final Exam 20% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

Introduction to the discipline of graphic design. and historicalHistorical overview of the graphic design industrynotable graphic design movements. Emphasis on the Graphic Designer’s role. Focus on industry workflow and standards. Computer software and hardware capabilities. Reinforcement that computers are “tools” in the creative process. The designer’s contribution to society. Elements and principles of design: Pattern, ornament, –isms, Bauhaus and beyond. Composition and structure: Movements and trends Visits to industry settings.

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 154 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Typography I COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course explores the history and foundation of typography beginning in the 19th century to present day. Students will gain an understanding of typographic best practices, and an appreciation for the expressive qualities of type through lectures, projects and presentations. Students will study the history and foundation of typography. A series of projects will develop understanding of the formation of letterforms, the particular characteristics and aesthetic values of typefaces, proper layout, and the setting of type. Students will work in a traditional context of hand-rendering type.

PREREQUISITES: None COREQUISITES: GD 1586 PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 4560 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 25 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 10 Hrs Laboratory: 2015 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: 10 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Once per year Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 1995 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Graphic Design Faculty

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPEC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UEC) approval Date of meeting:

34

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GD 154 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Describe the Comprehend the historical development of typography 2. UnderstandUse industry standard typesetting termstypographic terminology

3. Classify typefaces into categoriesIdentify systems for type classification, type families, and letterforms 4. RecognizeDefine the anatomy of type Demonstrate an understanding of font formats, usage and licensing Calculate units of measurement Use best practices in the application of typography Use grids for page structure in the application of typography Create custom typographic solutions using hand lettering and digital tools Use type as image

5. Recognize and apply typesetting marks 6. Calculate units of measurement

7. Evaluate the readability of text in print and digital media 8. Assess and articulate the successful application of typography

METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Demonstrations Workshops Presentations Self-directed skill development Lecture Audiovisual Material Practise Library research Critiques METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Lupton, Ellen. Thinking with type: A critical guide for designers, writers, editors and students. 2nd Ed. Princeton Architectural Press, 2010. Bringhurst, Robert. The Elements of Typographic Style, 2nd Ed. Vancouver: Hartley & Marks, 1996. Saltz, Ina. Typography Essentials: 100 Design Principles for Working With Type. Beverly, MA: Rockport, 2009 Subscription to Lynda.com Jim Felici: The Complete Manual of Typography, Adobe press, 2003 James Craig, William Bevington and Susan E Meyer: Designing with Type: A Basic Course in Typography, 1999 4th edition, Watson Guptill, NY Friedrich Friedl:Typography: An Encyclopedic Survey of Type Design and Techniques Throughout History, 1998, Black Dog and Leventhal, NY SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Universal Type Client Adobe Type Library Adobe CS 5.5 Master collectioncurrent edition Macintosh computer iPad

35

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Exacto knife; steel ruler; spray glue; matte board; felt pen set; marker paper; French curves; tracing paper; coloured paperSTUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

15% Exercises: 5% each 10% Project 1: Type as image 20% Project 2: 16 Business Cards 20% Project 3: Typographic poster 25% Project 4: Event promotion 5% Group presentations 5% Quiz Projects 50% Short assignments 20% Mid-term 15% Final 15% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

Weeks 1-3An introduction to typography. Historical review and presentation assignments. Systems used in typography: Type classification, type families, and letterforms The anatomy of the letterform. Typographic terminology and measures. Using type as image. An exploration of the expressive qualities of typography. Creating original typographic solutions using hand lettering. Creating logotypes using custom letterforms. Typeface versus font. Understanding font formats, use and licensing.

and introduction of studio projects Weeks 4-5 Industry terminology: historical and contemporary; Continuation of projects including drawing of rough production layouts requiring solutions to typographic problems; Overview of various kinds of type and their characteristics Weeks 6-7 Contextual explorations pertaining to hand lettering with an emphasis on the history of craft and its critical reception Weeks 8-10 Further development of student projects solving typographic design problems Weeks 11-12 Group Critiques

Using best practices in the application of numerals, punctuation, ligatures, kerning, tracking, line spacing, alignment, paragraphs, and hierarchy.

Layout autopsy: “How do you see?” Information hierarchy An introduction to grids Typography for print versus screen Analysis of digital typographic content

36

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 157 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Primary Digital GraphicsDigital Design Media I COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces digital design applications for image making in both vector and raster formats. Content driven projects combined with workshops will focus on creating images for different types of media and using the right tool for the right task. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of graphic composition & digital graphics. Content-driven projects will be combined with workshops on vector-based illustrations and the effective utilization and manipulations of this digital drawing tool.

PREREQUISITES: None COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 2725 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 6 Hrs Laboratory: 2725 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: 10 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Once per year Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: January 2004 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: May 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Graphic Design Faculty

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee (UEC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 157 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • describe the capabilities of digital image software and continue investigation through self-directed learning; • use software and industry specific terminology, menus, and navigation; • discern which tool to use for which task and which media; • set up preferences and create new documents; • apply essential keyboard and navigation shortcuts; • apply software automation features to do more in less time; • implement best workflow techniques for font management, importing, enhancing, and printing images from scanners and digital cameras; • create raster format images and vector-based digital graphics; • attain proficiency using digital imaging software; and • execute the requirements for print and difital design projects, utilizing skills to formulate content. • Comprehend capabilities of computer software such as Adobe Illustrator • Set up documents & create and modify paths • Create and edit objects • Apply colour and gradients & filters • Create format and edit type • Import & export files and prepare files for print & the web • Comment critically on design projects (layout, typography, and image/text juxtaposition) and their reception METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Demonstration using Proxima projection Laboratory instruction TutorialsLectures Demonstrations Workshops Tutorials Self-directed skill development METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Lourekas, P. & Weinmann, E. Visual Quickstart Guide, Photoshop CS5. Berkeley, California: Peachpit Press, 2010. Adobe Illustrator CS5. Classroom in a Book. California: Adobe Press, 2010. Subscription to Lynda.com Software manual Adobe Illustrator curriculum Adobe Illustrator Classroom in a Book ISBN 0201756242 SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Universal Type Client Adobe Type Library Adobe CS 5.5 Master collectioncurrent edition Macintosh computer iPad Zip disks Software Computer STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

38

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35% Exercises: 5% each 20% Project 1: Composite Image 20% Project 2: Pictogram Series 15% Project 3: Extreme Makeover 10% Quiz Quizzes 20% Assignments 60% Final Project 20% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

An introduction to digital imaging, and Adobe CS including Illustrator, Photoshop, Bridge, Acrobat and Distiller. Using Adobe Photoshop:

Preferences, menus, toolbox, option bar, layers and palettes Working with files; viewing images; grids and guides; customizing the work area; recovery and undo; managing the work

space and floating palettes; image and canvas size; and using the file menu Using Adobe Bridge to manage and select digital images

• Types of images, sizes, resolutions and formatsUnits: 1. Graphic production applications, their capabilities & limitations 2. Software navigation & terminology 3. Series of projects outlined on a chapter by chapter basis 4. Software as a tool in the creative process 5. Emphasis on professional design 6. Critiques of digital layouts

Colour modes; colour management; display proofs; channels and bit depth; converting between colour modes and choosing the correct mode

Colour and tonal adjustments; viewing histograms and pixel value; adjusting images with levels; curves and exposure; hue/saturation colour balance corrections; improving highlight and shadow detail, matching, replacing and mixing colours

Making selections; adjusting pixel selections; using masks; layer basics; grouping and linking layers, opacity and blending options

Channels and spot colours; layer effects and styles; painting tools, filters, type layers Interactive design components and save for web feature Applying content-aware fill, stamp tool and healing brush tool to retouch with accuracy; creating complex layer masks

and perform color-correction tasks; using sharpening and blurring techniques; combining multiple versions of an image to simulate greater dynamic range; applying expert masking techniques for seamless photo composition; and using the best techniques for converting color images to black and white

Using Adobe Illustrator:

Preferences, new document set-up, guides, elements, tools, palettes, units of measure, display, navigation, and view size Tools and palettes. Placing images, drawing with the pen tool. Creating more complex shapes, live trace. More pen tool, advanced type functions, pathfinder and filters Creating more complex objects and advanced type functions Reviewing tools palette, guides, stacking orders and using layers. Illustrator file format compatibility Graphing tools and printing. Web design components

Using Adobe Acrobat:

Acrobat navigation, setup, features and presentation elements Creating links and interactive functions for online and on-screen

39

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 161 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Graphic Design IGraphic and Digital Design I COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces visual communication and how we perceive images and words.  Students gain an understanding of the fundamentals of perception and design thinking. Exercises and projects emphasize conceptual development, composition, and the visual solution.  Students will learn the fundamental principles of design through the creative use of space. The students will learn the architecture behind good design and develop problem solving skills and an 'eye' for good design while working with words and images. Visual communication skills will be enhanced through the process of individual and group brainstorming sessions.

PREREQUISITES: None COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 3330 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 1021 Hrs Laboratory: 20 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: 6 Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Annually Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2003 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Graphic Design Faculty

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: Feb. 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: Feb. 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: Feb. 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee (UEC) approval Date of meeting:

40

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GD 161 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Define the communications objectives for a design project

Apply principles of design to elements of design. Master graphic design terminology. Sketch 'thumbnails' and develop 'comprehensive roughs'. Solve visual communication problems. Practice craftsmanship.

Judge visual aesthetics Generate concepts for a design solution Implement a process for the development of a design solution Develop content for a design solution Apply typography, image and colour in a layout Create design solutions that meet communications objectives Articulate the rationale for a design solution

METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Demonstrations Presentations Lecture. Review and Practice. Demonstration. Textbook. Library Research. Brainstorming. Problem Solving. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Ambrose, Gavin; and Harris, Paul. The fundamentals of creative design, 2nd Ed. AVA Academia, 2011. Lupton, Ellen ed. Graphic design thinking: Beyond brainstorming. Princeton Architectural Press, 2011. Stone, Terry Lee. Managing the Design Process: Concept Development. Rockport Publishers 2010 Graphic Design Basics by Amy E. Arntson ISBN 0155046462 Using Design Basics to Get Creative Designs by Bryan L. Peterson ISBN 0891346511 The Non-Designer's Design Book by Robin Williams ISBN 1566091594 SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Spray Glue *Matte Board *Felt Pen Set *Marker Paper *French Curves *X-acto Knife *Steel Ruler Colored PaperAdobe CS current edition Macintosh computer Portable media storage STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

5% Project 1: Creative brief 10% Project 2: Design thinking – research and concept development

41

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25% Project 3: Exercises in graphic design basics (5 x 5% each) 20% Project 4: Zine 20% Project 5: Poster 20% Project 6: Identity Projects 50% Assignments 20% Journal 20% Tests 20% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

An introduction to the design process: From problem to the solution. Defining the challenge. Understanding communications objectives and the creative brief. Research methods for design projects. Generating ideas and concept development: Mind mapping, 20 x 20 thumbnails and mood boards. An introduction to the graphic design basics: Formats, layout and grids, typography, image, colour, and print finishing Developing the design solution. Creating mock-ups for presentation. Presenting design solutions. How to write a rationale. Projects solving visual communication problems. Principles and elements of design and their terminology. Craftsmanship through thumbnails and conceptual roughs. Critiquing and brainstorming skills.

42

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 203 College of Arts – Visual Arts 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Interactive Motion DesignDynamic Media I: Motion Graphics COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

In this course students study and produce interactive graphics. Students learn to design and to critique graphic time changes for the web and for video. Design is studied in relation to techniques for editing and composing time lapses, sound, typography, and media integration.

In this course, students are introduced to the production of motion graphics. Students learn to design and to critique graphic time changes for the web and video. Design is studiesd in relation to techniques for editing and composing time lapses, sound, typography, and media integration.

PREREQUISITES: One of GD 101, CIS 104, or GD 157. GD 161 recommended.GD 157

COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 18 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 7 Hrs Laboratory: 35 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 2324 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: annually Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2007 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: May 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): J. Nolte & A. Babiarz

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

43

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GD 203 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • articulate a language of motion kinetic action through study of techniques representing time lapse, juxtaposition, velocity, and illusion • recognize the benefits of time-based software such as Flash and identifiedand identify its interfacerespective interfaces • utilize scenes and create and edit masked and guided layers • execute simple timeline-based animation • edit animation with action script • modify animation actions with present controls • select desired quality settings for publishing • add sound to a movie • create and edit a button • move graphics along a path • create, format, and edit text • create and modified modify movie clip symbols • produce individual assignments integrating time-based media METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Demos using proxima projection, lab instruction, tutorials, examination of source files, projects and independent work, audio visual materials, guest speaker. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Software manual Krasner, Jon. Motion Graphic Design and Fine Art Animation: Principles and Practice by Jon Krasner,, Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 2004. Greene, David. How Did They Do That? Motion Graphics by David Greene. Rockport Publishers, Jan 1, 2003. Meyer, Trish & Meyer, Chris. Creating Motion Graphics with After Effects, Essential and Advanced Techniques.5 by Trish Meyer and Chris Meyer Elsevier Science & Technology Books, 2010. Adobe Creative Team. Adobe Flash Professional CS5 Classroom in a Book. 2010. Adobe Creative Team. Adobe After Effects CS5 Classroom in a Book. 2010. Subscription to Lynda.com SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Zip disks,Portable media storage Adobe CS current edition Macintosh computer STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

Final project 20% Short assignments 60% Short tests 20% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

Introduction to the psychology and physical factors informing our perception of motion Software: capabilities and limitations; terminology and navigation Experimental animation and title design Creating compositions and interactive design Animation techniques: series of projects on an outlined chapter by chapter basis Working with layers

44

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Navigating in space Displaying time Spatial key frames and paths Output and delivery Reinforcement of software as a tool in the creative process Group critiques of individual projects

45

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 204 College of Arts – Visual Arts 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Interactive Page Design II COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

In this course students will be introduced to designing interactive pages for the Web. Emphasis will be placed on how to apply software tools with regard to originality, user interactivity, variables of the Internet, differing technologies, adaptation of HTML code by hand, and site organization. Diverse applications will be encouraged, from educational to commercial on the role of the designer in the creation of websites using a professional web-authoring tool.

PREREQUISITES: GD 201 and oOne of the following: GD 101, CIS 104 or above202

COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISIT

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 305 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: Hrs Laboratory: 205 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 244 Student directed learning: 10 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: annually Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2004 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Graphic Design Faculty

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: November 25, 2011Febru

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012Decem2011

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 204 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • Apply the principles and processes of interactive design • Use professional site authoring tools • Utilize software tools for the design of pages on the web • Identify the interface of the software being used (e.g. Dreamweaver) and understand its advantages in relation to HTML • Integrate forms within an HTML grammarand other interactive documents • Identify and use cascading style sheets • Recognize design challenges in relation to typography on the web • Utilize text tools • Create and modify tables in a layout • Create and modify frames • Create and manage an information-rich website METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Demonstration using proxima projection Laboratory instruction Lecture Tutorials Examination of source files Project and independent study Audiovisual materials METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Mulaczyk, Marek. Build websites that work with Adobe Dreamweaver CS5, Sai Training, 2011. Subscription to Lynda.com Tapley, Rebecca Who’s Afraid of Web Design? By Rebecca Tapley, Academioc Press, 1999 Watrall, Ethan Dreamweaver Mx: Design and Technology (with CD Rom) by Ethan Watrall, Sybex, 20222002 Meadhra, Michael How to Do Everything with Dreamweaver ® MX by Michael Meadhra, McGrawHill ,2002 SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Zip disksPortable media storage. Access to home computer and

related softwareAdobe CS current edition5.5 Master Collection Portable media storage, Macintosh computer STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

Final project 20% Short assignments 60% Short tests 20% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

1. Introduction to course content: , , introduction to design, composition, and construction of interactive page design. I. and introduction to projects 2. Introduction to software capabilities and limitations 3. Software navigation and terminology. Introduction to HTML concepts and integration of forms within HTML page

47

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4. and 5. Continuation of project work according to graduated outlines in preceding works; composition of simple images and consideration of sound components; implementation of site control; importing 3rd party files; building links within the page 6. Creating and modifying tools in layout. 7. and 8. Creating and modifying frames and utilizing parascript 9. and 10. Design challenges of typography on the web; utilizing text tools 11. and 12. Continuation of projects and ongoing individual critiques of work based on visual and sensory literacy 13. Presentations and group critique

48

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 216 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Drawing & Illustration II COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course is a continuation of VA 113 (Introduction to Drawing) and further explores perceptual and expressive drawing, traditional mediums and perspective drawing. It introduces illustration for graphic and digital designIt introduces illustration for graphic and digital design (2D and 3D), the process of illustration, and professional practice as well as diagrammatic and mapping functions. Students Ideas are developed fromcreate illustrations from concept through to final working drawingscompositions while exploring style, voice, storytelling and emotional context for reproduction..

PREREQUISITES: VA 113 COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 4560 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 25 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 5 Hrs Laboratory: 2030 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Once per year Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: January 2005 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Graphic Design Faculty

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UEC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee (UEC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 216 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • apply and build on skills learned in VA 113 – Introduction to Drawing • describe how illustration is used in graphic and digital design • describe the process for an illustration project and the role of the art director and client • define style, voice and emotional context in illustration • research and generate reference material for illustration projects • use drawings as a method for exploration, conceptual development, storyboarding, planning, and communication • understand and applydemonstrate skills in one-point, two-point, and three-point perspective perspective to 3D space and structure • demonstrate a more sophisticated understanding and practice of the functionsimplement effective use of of line, shape, tone, texture, volume, proportion, shadow, space, composition, and scale in , and mark-makingillustration • develop techniques for applying traditional mediums • recognize voice and emotional context in illustration • apply create illustrations to for graphic and digital design projects • critique and evaluate the effectiveness of an illustration publications, packaging, and • have the discipline and attitudes necessary to manage their time, attendance, and participation for deadlines and portfolio submissionsdemonstrate professionalism for the incremental and timely completion of project tasks METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures; assignments; research; individual problem solving in relation to applied projects; individual and group critiques. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Heller, S., Chwast, S. Illustration, A Visual History. Harry N Abrams, 2008. Michael Fleishman, Michael. Exploring Illustration, Thompson Publishers, 2004. Stephen Hiller Heller, S., and Marshall Arisman, Marshall. The Education of an Illustrator, Allsworth Press, NY, 2000. John Montague, John. Basic Perspective Drawing: A Visual Approach, 3rd 5th edition. John Wiley and Sons, 19902009. SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Watercolour paints, paints, gouache paints, acrylic paint, oil paintAssorted paints, palette, water container, brushes, pencils, ruler, T-Square, compass, technical pens, utility knife, artists’ quality pencil crayons, graphite, charcoal, conté, pencils (2H to 6B) illustration board, scratch board, cover stock, bond paper, tracing paper, masking tape, extra fine point black marker (pilot fineliner), 18” x 24” sketchbook. Other materials as required. Adobe CS 5.5 Master Collectioncurrent edition STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

60% individual weekly projects 20% mid-term assignment 20% final portfolio presentation COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

Weeks 1-2 An introduction to illustration: The profession and how it has evolved since its beginnings in the golden age of illustration. How illustration is used in graphic and digital design today. Introduction of interpretive projects for semester, in-class projects and homework assignments.Style, voice and emotional context in illustration. Technical drawing skills, mediums and techniques: Pencil and charcoal tonal illustration and perspective exercise – i) planes, elevations, and projections; ii) sloping planes and surfaces.

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OWeeks 3-4 Continuation of drawing 3D space and structuresne-point, two-point and three-point perspective. The figure in perspective. Integration of colour and space. Mapping functions. Using line, shape, tone, texture, volume, proportion, shadow, composition, and scale in illustration. Pen and ink renderings – perspective views and geometric tools. Weeks 5-6 Gouache An exploration of traditional mediums: Gouache, acrylic, oil, watercolour, pastel, scratchboard, pen and ink, charcoal, graphite, and pencil crayon. and use of symbolism in illustration; pastel techniques and scratchboard. Shadows and reflections. Weeks 7-8 Acrylic painting and oil painting projects. The figure in perspective. Historical and contemporary examples. Weeks 9-10 Integration of colour and space and mapping functions. Weeks 11-12The process of illustration: The client brief and working with an art director. The role of the client. Researching and generating reference material for illustration projects. Using drawings as a method for exploration, composition, conceptual development, storyboarding, and communication. Working with content and layout.

Conceptual illustration— using symbolism, metaphors, puns, analogies. Narrative illustration and storytelling. Technical illustration and infographics. Figures, portraits, situations, environments. Decoration and ornament

Developing style and voice. Preparing illustration for reproduction. Scanning, retouching, resolution and file types. Critiquing illustration — objectives, solution, composition, mediums, aesthetic and technical qualities. Professionalism and the incremental and timely completion of project tasks. Types of illustration projects:

Editorial and conceptual illustration Illustration for information design Illustration for dynamic media Book illustration Graphic novels Illustration for 3D packaging Illustration for advertising Illustration for environmental design Murals and supergraphics

Applying diagrammatic conceptions to 3D products. Group critiques of completed student projects.

51

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 231 College of Arts – Visual Arts 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Dynamic Media II: Animation and Character Modeling and Animation COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces students to computer animation and modeling as forms of artistic expression, including character design, rigging, texturing, lighting, and compositing. Design will be explored within the context of a history of 3D graphics and computer animation.

PREREQUISITES: One of GD 101, CIS 104 or higher, or GD 157. GD 161 recommendedGD 203

COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 10 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: Hrs Laboratory: 45 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: 5 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: annually Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2007 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: May 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Arthur Babiarz and Jacqueline Nolte

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: Februay 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

52

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GD 231 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • ArticulateDeveloped a rationale for creating a character • Develop their analysis of the skin/clothing design • Produce profile line drawings • Utilize extruded joints in terms of the character’s bones • Texture individual parts and the whole • Fine tune mapping of coordinates METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures, demonstrations, lab time, individual research and production, presentations METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Ratner, Peter Mastering 3D Animation – Ratner, Peter, Allworth Press, 2004 SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Portable media storage Computer and related softwareAdobe CS current edition Macintosh computer STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

• 6 session projects 40% • Final project 40% • Test 12% • Attendance, participation 8% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

Section 1: Introduction of course objectives and projects; discussion and beginning of project to rationalize a character Section 2: Historical contextualization; preparation of model for skeletal structure; wireframe modeling Section 3: Polyglon vs. splines and nurbs; animation without a skeleton Section 4: Basic 3D shapes and rotations; surface and subdivision modeling Section 5: From profile line drawings to extruding and skinning Sections 6-8: 2D and 3D tools plus digitizers and scanners Sections 9: From seamless models to spline methods Section 10: Lighting Section 11: Poses and reviewing head, torso, arms, and legs Section 12: Facial expression Section 13: Presentation and critiques

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 317 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Advanced Publication DesignGraphic and Digital Design II COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course presents the field of communication design, the process of problem solving, and how to design effective visual communications solutions. Students focus on strategy, research, and target audience analysis in the development of comprehensive visual communications projects.In this course students will develop advanced designs for publication (books, magazines, newspapers, etc.) from concept to a printed portfolio piece. Industry production processes and materials will also be studied. In addition, the students will enhance their computer skills and creativity. Through a series of projects students will also learn to critique and meet deadlines.

PREREQUISITES: GD 154, GD 156, and GD 157 COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 25 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 5 Hrs Laboratory: 3025 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: 5 Hrs Maximum enrolment: 2324 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Once per year Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2007 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): J. Nolte & A. Babiarz

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UEC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee (UEC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 317 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify different types of visual communications projects and their purpose Define a graphic design problem and Ggather information, materials and research to solve a graphic design problem Analyze the information, materials and research gathered and strategize a project direction Develop a design brief, mood boards and plan a visual communications project Create design concepts and develop comprehensive design solutions Develop proficiency in the application of typography, layout and image making Describe the production process for different types of media for the implementation of visual communications projects

• attained a brief historical overview of publication design • explored and practiced print publication design theories • recognized and explained the anatomy of a multiple page document • composed successful publication layouts of different kinds (e.g. magazine, newspaper, book) • planned publication criteria • compared benefits and limitations of industry materials and processes METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Demonstrations Presentations In-class project development Studio Tour Lectures, demos, group and individual problem solving, lab work, field trip, audio visual materials. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

38th Annual Publication Design Annual by the Society of Publication Designers Magazine Design that Works: Secrets for Successful Magazine Design (That Works Series) by Stacey King, 2001 Breaking the Rules in Publication Design by Inc. Supon Design Group, Supon Phornirunlit, and Supon Design Group, 2001 The Chicago Manual of Style – 14th editionLanda, Robin. Graphic Design Solutions, 4th Ed. Clark Baxter, 2011. Visocky O’Grady, The Information Design Handbook. F+W Publications, 2008. Barry, Pete. The Advertising Concept Book, Think Now, Design Later: A complete guide to creative ideas, strategies and campaigns.Thames and Hudson, 2010. SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Macintosh computer Adobe CS current edition Portable media storageXacto-type utility knife Spray glue Felt pen set French curves Tracing paper Steel ruler Matte board and marker paper STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

25% Project 1: Publication design 25% Project 2: Advertising

55

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25% Project 3: Information design 25% Project 4: Corporate communication Projects 60% Short assignments 20% Mid-term 10% Final 10% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

An overview of different types of visual communications projects and their purpose: Book Design: Covers, interiors and designing for a series. Analyzing books and magazines published in print and digital media. Types of publications – editorial, fiction, non-fiction, informational, etc. Advertising: Integrated campaigns and flexible strategies across multiple media platforms. Ideas, headlines and visuals. Information Design: Data visualization. Cognitive principles, communication principles and aesthetic principles. Exhibition design, signage and wayfinding. Corporate Communication: Conceptualizing corporate vision, themes and positioning. Types of corporate communications projects – brochures, catalogues, direct mail, annual report, social responsibility report. Types of corporate communication clients – Public, private, government and non-profit organizations. The role of social responsibility in a corporation. The five phases of the graphic design process: Introducing Robin Landa’s “Orientation > Analysis > Concepts > Design > Implemention” phases

1. Orientation: Defining the graphic design problem and understanding the client’s culture, values, and history. Determining needs, requirements, audience, and competition. Using information gathering tools and initiating market research.

2. Analysis: Strategizing a project direction. Examining each part of the problem and defining each part. Organizing and analyzing the information, materials and research gathered. Developing a design brief, mood boards and planning a visual communications project. Managing strategy in different types of contexts (design studio, advertising agency, publisher). Using mood boards to establish direction for colour, style and strategy. Involving the client in the discovery process.

3. Concepts: Creating design concepts by articulating rationales for design elements and creative direction of the communications solution. Applying reflective thinking, interpretation, and reasoning to concept development. Establishing the theme, tone and direction of the content. Creating the content.

4. Design: Developing the design solution. Creating thumbnail sketches, roughs and comprehensives. Using typography, images, and layout effectively. Techniques for client presentations.

5. Implementation: Implementing design solutions. An introduction to the production process for different types of media. Estimating, project management, production and client liaison.

Designing visual communication using the five phases of the graphic design process. Historical overview and design theories Overview of software used: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop Identifying projects Publication planning Developing appropriate formats Terminology Design considerations and criteria Page layout, typography, and graphics Make-up of a multiple page document Identifying use of digital photography Prepress planning and costing Presentations and group critiques of projects

56

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 369 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Business Essentials for Graphic DesignersProfessional Practices I COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces basic business practices, ethics, studio management, and marketing for self-promotion, providing essential knowledge for working in the freelance environment. Students will create a résumé, self-promotion collateral and necessary business documents to prepare them for career opportunities. This course is focused on business practices for those beginning a professional Graphic Design career. The complexities of the relationship between one’s business practice and the external expectations of institutions, employers, and clients will be explored. Students will investigate a broad and expanding range of information and transferable skills necessary for the graphic designer to move into the professional field. Note: Students may only take one of either GD 269 or GD 369 for credit.

PREREQUISITES: 45 university-level credits, including 15 GD credits COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: GD 269 (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: GD 269 for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 4560 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 2530 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 5 Hrs Laboratory: Hrs OTHER: Field experience: 5 Hrs Maximum enrolment: 2524 Student directed learning: 1520 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Once per year Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2011 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September

2018January 2017

(four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Graphic Design Faculty (reviewed by Arthur Babiarz)

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

57

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GD 369 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • Assess benefits and limitations of employment and self-employment • Set up a graphic design studio • Develop and implementPrepare a strategic simple business and marketing planaccording to various regulating bodies. • Organize and manage project timelines, finances, and record-keeping within the business setting • Demonstrate networking skills • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the moral, legal, and professional framework of a business practice • Apply research, organizational, and creative skills to promoting a business practice • Evaluate personal creative strengths and career focus • Identify different kinds of career opportunities in the creative industry • Develop self promotion strategies and personal marketing materials METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lecture, guest speaker, field trip, storytelling, textbook, project/independent study. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

The Graphic Designer’s Guide to Pricing, Estimating, and Budgeting ISBN-10: 1581157134 Foote, Cameron. The Creative Business Guide to Running a Graphic Design Business. WW Norton, 2009. ISBN-10: 0393732991 Slaunwhite, Steve and Huggins, Michael. Start & Run a Graphic Design Business. International Self-Counsel Press, 2009. ISBN-10: 1551808501 Perkins, Shel. Talent is not enough: Business secrets for designers. Pearson, 2006. Stone, Terry Lee. 2010. Managing the Design Process: Implementing Design. An essential manual for the working designer. Rockport: USA. Russell, Edward. The Fundamentals of Marketing. Ava Publishing (UK) Ltd. 2009.SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Adobe CS current edition Macintosh computer Portable media storage STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

Written assignments (estimate, time sheet, invoice, blog entry, linked-in profile) 4030% Mid-term exam 2520% Group project 30% Self promotion collateral 35% Résumé 15% Attendance and participation 5% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

1. Introduction to the business of graphic design. Types of businesses, establishing and registering your company.

2. Creating a business plan. 3. Introduction to running a design studio.

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Studio management, roles and responsibilities Operational and profitability issues. Estimates, quotations and proposals. Record keeping, time tracking, invoicing and project management.

4. Business ethics and professional design practices. 5. Business “now.” Design thinking and crowd-sourcing. 6. Career opportunities: an overview of working in the design industry.

Introduction to studio positions/specialties, career paths and industry partners. 7. Freelance versus employment: Marketing creative services and self promotion. 8. The business focused portfolio presentation versus the employer focused portfolio presentation. 9. Defining your brand essence. Personal SWOT analysis, comparative matrix, and promoting your strengths. 10. On-line presence and the value of a digital profile: E-mail, LinkedIn, blogging, social media, online

contributions; business etiquette; ethics 11. Creating self promotional collateral 12. Writing and designing a résumé

Week 1 Introduction — the Market and Opportunities. Commerce (print and electronic publishing - TV, Internet), packaging, media, environmental graphics • Creative Director, Art Director, Project Manager, Production Manager, Sales • Employment, Freelancing, Contracting, Small Business Week 2 Career Promotional Tools • Cover Letter, Resume, CV - hard copy, online • Flyer, Business Card, Alternative • Portfolio—hard copy, on-line; Video—self intro/promotion Week 3 Initial Business Tools—Forms. • Letter of Intent, Job Estimate, Contract, Invoice, Timelines • Website—Online Forms, Survey Page • Business Plan, Accounting Software–review Week 4 Graphic Design Industry Overview • Print Media, Digital Media, Multimedia • Tendencies and Trends Week 5 Making Business Legal • Naming Business, Registration, Office Renting/Leasing • Copy Right Issues, Tax, Business Bank Account Week 6 Business Office Equipping, Office Practices • Computer Hardware, Software, Digital Camera, Furnishing • Telecommunication—Telephone, Answering Machine, Internet Week 7 Marketing of Skills and Services • Marketing Plan, Description of Services • Networking—Societies, Chamber of Commerce, Tradeshows, Internet, Special Events, Contractors • Website—About, Services, Portfolio, Survey/Feedback pages • Writing Articles, Consulting, Case Study Week 8 Financing and Pricing Work • Business Expenses, Financing Options • Project Estimate—Expenses, Materials, Labour Week 9 Field Trip • A visit to a Renowned Design Agency & a Small Design Studio Week 10 Industry and Market Research • Industry Analysis, Competition • Competitive Advantage, SWOT, Self-Employment Feasibility Week 11 Organizing Business Computer Files and Folders • Client List, Contracts, Marketing, Finances, Bookkeeping • Forms, Photos, Cliparts, Fonts, Logos Week 12 Final Presentation Week 13 Extended Education Opportunities • Environmental Graphics, Product and Services Branding, Illustrating, Social Media, Project Management

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 374 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Concepts and Systems in Communication DesignBrand Identity COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course introduces students to the field of brand identity and covers the entire process of brand development and best practices. Students develop a comprehensive re-branding project that involves research, strategy, logo design and presentation, and the design of collateral to support the brand. This course introduces students to the development and analysis of concepts and systems in Communication Design. Students will produce designs for systems that entail specific client objectives, audience profiles, budgets, and production plans. Communication Design will take the form of a range of projects in various media for a grouping of clients including commercial, educational, and institutional.

Note: Students with credit for GD 164 cannot take GD 374 for further credit

PREREQUISITES: GD317GD 154, GD 156, and either GD 203 or GD 204 COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: GD 164 (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: GD 164 for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 4560 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 2530 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 10 Hrs Laboratory: 20 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: January 2000 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): J. Nolte

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UEC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee (UEC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 374 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: - Assess and apply clients’ needs - Solve visual problems - Formulate usage style sheet - Integrate reproduction issues with various media - Create communication design strategies to support marketing plans - Analyze and interpret communication strategies designed for specific target audiences - Synthesize conceptual, visual, and technical skills - Design items such as product and service flyers and brochures, in house promotions, and web promotions.Identify

different types of branding. Define branding and brand identity. Use industry terms and tools for the development of brand identity. Implement a process and methodology for the design of brand identity. Determine appropriate marketing materials to support a brand. Identify the role of brand identity in relation to product design and packaging. Create a comprehensive brand identity. Prepare presentations and materials for a comprehensive brand identity project.

METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Research Information briefs Independent production Group CritiquesLectures Demonstrations In-class project development Critiques and peer review METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Wheeler, Alina. Designing Brand Identity: An essential guide for the whole branding team, 3rd Ed. Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2009. Lupton, Ellen ed. Graphic design thinking: Beyond brainstorming. Princeton Architectural Press, 2011. Graphically Speaking: A Visual lexicon for Achieving Better Designers – Client Communication by Lisa Buchanan, How Design Books, 2003 Letterhead and Logo Design 8 by Top Design Studios, Rockport Publishers, 2003 Systems Analysis, Design, and Development Concepts. Principles and Practices by Charles S Wassan, Wiley-Interscience, 2005

SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Adobe CS current edition5.5 Master Collection Portable Media Storage Macintosh computer Marker paper; matte board; felt pens; tracing paper; zip disks; USB removable storage units; software; technical pens; PC computer STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

15% Project 1: Projects: 60%

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Short assignments 30% Short tests 10%Brand strategy 20% Project 2: Visual identity 30% Project 3: Touchpoints 20% Project 4: Brand book 15% Project 5: Brand standards and guidelines COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

An introduction to brand identity Types of branding:

New company and new product Name change Revitalizing a brand – repositioning a company Revitalizing a brand identity – visual and experiential accessibility Developing an integrated system – essence, consistency, style, visual cohesiveness Digital branding Personal branding Cause branding Event branding

Brand basics: Strategy, positioning, customer experience, architecture, messaging, and cultural insight. Brand identity terms and tools. The process for designing brand identity: 1. Research

Market research Stakeholders Customer experience Brand matrix Competitive analysis Ethnography

2. Strategy The brand blueprint as a tool. Creating a moodboard to reflect the brand blueprint. Presenting brand identity strategy.

3. Visual Identity The logo Application

4. Touchpoints Trademark process Stationery Website Product design, packaging, advertising, collateral, environments, signage, vehicles etc.

5. Assets Brand book Brand standards and guidelines Launching a brand and building brand champions

Introduction to packaging Preparing presentations and materials for a comprehensive brand identity project 1. Historical overview 2. Introduction of complex communication challenges 3. Explanation of design solutions in accordance with specific needs (seminar based) 4. Projects requiring visual solutions 5. Analysis of how to incorporate client needs 6. Conceptual Development in relation to the above 7. Standards for reproduction of graphic and communication forms devised for client 8. Product and service flyers and brochures 9. Direct mail packages

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10. In house promotions 11. Web based promotions 12-13. Synthesis of conceptual, visual, and practical skills in final presentations; group critiques of communication strategies

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 1586 College of Arts – Visual Arts 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Digital Publication Design Media II COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

In this course, students will learn how to produce documentation from design concept through to output. Manual skills of custom prints are combined with knowledge of desktop publishing and offset printing. Practical design projects range from creating single-sided literature to longer publications incorporating text and graphic elements.This course introduces professional layout applications for print and digital publishing. Students will produce comprehensive communication projects while gaining a working knowledge of layout software including font and file management, colour systems, a digital glossary, and file formats.

Note: Students who have credit for GD 156 cannot take GD 158 for further credit.

PREREQUISITES: GD 101or CIS 104. GD 157 or 161 recommended

COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: GD 156 (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: GD 156 for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 15 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 10 Hrs Laboratory: 35 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 243 Student directed learning: 10 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: annual Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: January 2007 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: May 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): J. Nolte/A. Babiarz

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 158 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • describe the capabilities of layout applications for print and digital publishing and continue investigation through self-directed learning; • use software and industry specific terminology, menus, and navigation; • discern which tool(s) to use for which task(s) and which media; • set up preferences and create new documents; • apply essential keyboard and navigation shortcuts; • apply software automation features to do more in less time; • implement best workflow techniques for font and file management; • create layouts and publications for print and digital media including touch screens; • attain proficiency in print and digital publishing using layout applications; and • support the skill and layout related requirements for print and digital design projects. * demonstrate understood understanding of the capabilities of the software being used, for example, Adobe InDesign * demonstrate understood understanding of the basic principles of the design process * been introduced to an overviewrecognize a variety of publishing formats * created a document using the software package * created, formatted, and edited text * managed multiple-page documents * created and edited objects * learned to input and edit images * learned to create and modify paths * successfully selected, applyied, and edited colours * effectively combined manual skills of doing custom prints with desktop publishing and offset printing knowledge * developed utilize critical skills in relation to assessing publication design and learned to articulate these observations METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Demonstrations Workshops Tutorials Self-directed skill development Demonstration using proxima projection, lab instruction, tutorials, lab work. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Cohen, S. Visual Quickstart Guide, InDesign CS5. Berkeley, California: Peachpit Press, 2010. Adobe creative team. Adobe InDesign CS5 classroom in a book, Adobe Press, 2010. Tondreau, Beth. Layout essentials: 100 design principles for using grids. Rockport, 2009. Subscription to Lynda.com Software manual. Adobe InDesign relevant edition Lentz Devall, Sandra Desktop Publishing Style Guide by Sandra Lentz Devall, Delmar Publications Samara, Timothy Publication Designing Workbook: A Real-World Guide to Designing Magazines, Newspapers and Newsletters by Timothy Samara, 2005 SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Universal Type Client Adobe Type Library Adobe CS 5.5 Master collectioncurrent edition Macintosh computer iPad

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Zip discs,Portable media storage system, software, computerSTUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

30% Exercises: 5% each 10% Project 1: Flyer 10% Project 2: Print and online advertisement 20% Project 3: 16 Page Book 20% Project 4: iPad Publication 10% Quiz Final project 20% Short assignments 60% Quizzes 20% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

An introduction to layout and Adobe CS including InDesign, Bridge, Folio Builder, Acrobat and Distiller. Creating graphic communication and publication documents in a typographical and page formatting computer program. Using Adobe InDesign:

Review of default/preference settings, guide elements, new document set-up, layout, tools, palettes, saving and glossary.

More tools, palettes, units of measurement, guides. Best practices: Font management and the Adobe Type library. Keyboard shortcuts. Getting around: display, navigation, view size. Picture box usage, layers, colours. Printing set-up. Typography tools. Style sheets. Manipulating type, spell check. Type styles. Master pages. Linking text boxes. Text wrap. Large document setup and printing. Document layout setup. Advanced colour setup, correct image importing. Blending mode, transparency. Production: Printing specifications, dieline, colours and folding dummy. Style sheets, “Line up everything,” proofing layouts, mechanical requirements and specifications. File format compatibility issues. Tables and other InDesign features.

Introduction to Adobe Digital Publishing Suite (DPS):

Using inDesign for iPad publishing. The touch screen environment, screen orientation and formats. DPS tools, installation and publishing.

Using Adobe Acrobat for publishing:

Acrobat Distiller setup. Create pdf proofs and print ready pdfs from InDesign. Acrobat navigation, setup, features and presentation.

Create links and interactive functions for online and on-screen. Print and digital file preparation, pdf for e-mail, and a press-ready pdf.

Week one: Intro to course content, software capabilities and limitations Week two: Software navigation and terminology; explanation of assignments culminating in creating documents based on software capabilities and unique design Weeks three to twelve: Projects outlined on a chapter-by-chapter basis Software as a tool in the creative process Designing with industry standards for input in mind Capabilities of the software being used, for example, Adobe InDesign Basic principles of the design process Overview of publishing formats Formatting and editing text Managing multiple-page documents Creating and editing objects

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Input and editing of images Creating and modifying paths Selecting, applying, and editing colours Overall comprehension and assessment of combining manual skills of doing custom prints with desktop publishing and offset printing knowledge Developing and articulating critical skills to assess one’s own publication design and that of others

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 3258 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Graphic Design for the WebInteractive Design for Portfolio COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course supports students with the design and development of an interactive portfolio for digital screens. Students will be introduced to current trends in web visual and experience design; front- and back-end development, and; open-source content management systems (CMS). Note: Students with credit for GD 258 cannot take GD 358 for further credit. Students will develop their own online portfolio as they learn advanced skills in today's leading web-based programs. Animation techniques, storyboard development and the development of sequenced art will be learned as well as file management, site mapping, layout, and navigation. Emphasis will be on portfolio development for both online and on CD.

PREREQUISITES: One of: VA 180, GD 157, GD 161, any CIS course numbered 100 or higher, or COMP 150GD 204COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: GD 258 (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: GD 258 for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 2730 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 6 Hrs Laboratory: 2715 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: 15 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Annually Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2006 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Arthur Babiarz

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UEC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Education Advisory Committee (UEC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 3258 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Identify and interpret trends in both web and experience design Integrate trend research into the planning and design processes for web-sites Describe and apply the roles of HTML, CSS and JavaScript in front-end development Describe and apply the role of server-side scripting and databases in back-end development Strategize the necessary skill-sets needed to plan, design and produce a variety of web sites Plan, design and produce a portfolio web site Install, customize and deploy an open-source content management system (CMS)

• design web page interface • create site-map • prepare graphics / images for web • use graphics / images in web pages • create animation for web • create image based links • build multi page website content • work with text in web pages • upload images to server • comment critically on the function and aesthetics of websites METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lecturing Demonstrations Production workshops Self-directed content development Out-of-class production On-line instruction Digital presentations Computer lab based instruction Hands on instructing Internet resources use Project development Independent study Consulting, discussion METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Subscription to Lynda.com Adobe Photoshop CS2 – Classroom in a Book SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Macintosh computer Flash drive Adobe CS current edition STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

20% Project 1: Portfolio web site design 15% Project 2: CMS installation and configuration 15% Project 3: Customized personal blog

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30% Project 4: Final portfolio web site 20% Project 5: Exam • 6 session projects 40% • Final project 40% • Test 12% • Attendance, participation 8% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

1. Introduction to a digital image editing tool - Photoshop • about bitmap/raster and vector imaging • application menu review • application tools review • application palettes review • creating a new document Current and emerging trends in both web and experience design Designer versus developer An analysis of digital portfolios Designing a digital portfolio Front-end technologies: Spry library of widgets and effects; JQuery library and jQuery UI plugins Back-end technologies: Development platforms Content Management Systems (CMS) Customizing CMS • project dimensions, resolution • working with guides and grids • working with selection • creating basic layout Introduction to the Web design • brief history of Internet • Internet dynamics • Internet Service Provider, hosting 2. Introduction to a digital image editing tool - Photoshop (continued) • working with selection (continued) • working with layers • working with transformation • working with color Website categories / types - reviewing existing websites - portal, e-commerce, e-learning, search engine, other Website content - front end / back end - page layout 3. Website concept development - Photoshop • working with channels - understanding channels - creating channels • working with masks - understanding masking process - creating masks • working with text - creating text - editing text Web site map Web page content description Web page layout / template development - masthead - links, navigation bar - banner - text, forms - images, background - animation - organizing website assets - defining course project 4. Image manipulation - Photoshop • image color modes - RGB, Indexed color, Duotone, Bitmap • image color adjustment commands - levels, curves, replace color, hue/saturation, desaturate

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• creating patterns • cropping images • working with color palettes • Course Project (Website) Development • Consulting 5. Preparing page layout for the Web (Part I) (ImageReady) • introduction to ImageReady software - software menu review - software tools review - saving for web - working with slices • dividing layout for the Web display 6. Preparing page layout for the Web (Part II) (ImageReady) • image optimization - file formats - understanding colors - color tables algorithms - dithering - matting - creating droplets 7. Creating animation (ImageReady) • benefits of animation • layer based animation • tweening • animated banner • making slideshow • automating tasks • interface design • typographical issues 8. Rollovers, Image Map (ImageReady) • rollovers - a visual communication asset • creating images for rollovers • creating rollovers • working with image maps • creating image maps 9. Basic Image correction (Photoshop) • Test • Course Project (Website) Development • Consulting 10. Managing site (Dreamweaver) • organizing files • creating root directory - local / remote • placing/replacing images • working with spacer • text formatting HTML/CSS • Course Project (Website) Development • Consulting 11. Creating Multi page Website (Dreamweaver) • assigning page links • duplicating pages • link images • displaying slideshow - popup window • Course Project (Website) Development • Consulting 12. Course project - Website completion • consulting • debugging • uploading website files to server 13. Presentation and Critique

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Graphic and Digital Design Course Rationale

Revisions of Graphic Design courses have been undertaken in order to accommodate the re-launch of the Graphic and Digital Design diploma on the Mission campus this September. A consultant was hired to review both the structure of the program and the efficacy of individual courses. Attached revisions reflect both the input of the consultant and the work of the Visual Arts Program Committee (which oversees Graphic and Digital Design).

The main structural/content shift in the program (and thus in the courses as well) was to implement enhanced digital content. Changes to course titles, descriptions, and learning outcomes form the backbone of this shift. In some cases, numbering was also changed to improve flow. Two new courses were added and one 200-level course was advanced to the 300-level.

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 202 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Interactive Design I COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Interactive mediums are integral to communication today, and this course focuses on the fundamentals of the interactive experience. It focuses on information architecture, interface design and usability. The emphasis is on computer screens, but other types of digital screens will also be introduced.

PREREQUISITES: GD 157 COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 30 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: Hrs Laboratory: 15 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: 15 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Once per year Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Karin Jager

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 202 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: • Define interactive design and its media platforms • Describe current media trends • Recognize effective interface design in digital interactive screens • Identify the principles of usability and human factors in interactive communications • Apply a process for the development of interactive design • Organize a body of information to an information design • Prepare layout and presentation requirements for information design METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Demonstrations In-class discussion In-class analysis of interface design Self-directed content development Out-of-class design development On-line research Digital presentations METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Interactive design: An introduction to the theory and application of user-centered design. Andy Pratt and Jason Nunes, Rockport Publishers, 2012. SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Adobe CS current edition Subscription to Lynda.com Macintosh computer Flash drive

STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

10% Project 1: User experience analysis 15% Project 2: Site maps 15% Project 3: Flow charts 20% Project 4: Wireframes 30% Project 5: Interface design layout 10% Final presentation COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

An introduction to interactive design and the user experience (UX). Current trends in interactive design and dynamic media. Digital branding and the user experience Understanding usability and different media platforms. The process of interactive design:

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• Information architecture, site maps and wireframes • Navigation and menu structures • Usability • Personas • Digital design patterns Design for mobility. Design for experience. Ethics, copyright, and fair use.

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

GD 361 College of Arts – Graphic Design 3 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Portfolio Development for Graphic and Digital Design COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Building a professional portfolio requires the integration of knowledge, technology and skills. In this course, students have the opportunity to demonstrate a culmination of their professional development through self-directed projects. Exercises in critical analysis, creative problem solving and presentation skills further enhance their abilities.

PREREQUISITES: 30 GD Credits COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: (b) Cross-listed with: (c) Cannot take: for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 30 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: Hrs Laboratory: 15 Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 24 Student directed learning: 15 Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: annually Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: September 2012 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Karin Jager

Department Head: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 3, 2012

Supporting area consultation (pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 17, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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GD 361 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Assess current portfolio content and determine requirements Plan portfolio content development based on personal strengths and chosen career direction Develop and refine projects for portfolio Compile, organize and label portfolio content for presentation Implement portfolio presentation techniques for one-on-one and one-on-group situations Articulate project objectives, development and rationales

METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures Demonstrations Self-directed content development Out-of-class design and production Presentations METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) x Portfolio assessment x Interview(s)

Other (specify):

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Myers, Debbie Rose. 2009. The Graphic Designer’s Guide to Portfolio Design. 2nd Ed. John Wiley and Sons. Rowe, Robert; Will, Gary; Linton, Harold. 2009. Graphic design portfolio strategies for print and digital media. Prentice Hall. Heller, Steven and Fernandes, Teresa. 2010. Becoming a graphic designer: A guide to careers in design. 4th Ed. John Wiley and Sons. SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

Adobe CS current edition Portable media storage Macintosh computer STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

15% Project 1: Portfolio plan 25% Project 2: Self-directed 25% Project 3: Self-directed 25% Project 4: Final portfolio presentation 10% Project 5: Project case study COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

The portfolio process – choosing your direction Types of portfolios – Format, content and structure Expectations for evolving design disciplines Planning your portfolio – project checklist Defining self-directed projects

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Meeting professional standards – innovation and originality; composition and typography; and solving visual communications problems.

Developing your personal brand Ethics and professional practice: Acknowledgements and credits Designing portfolio templates – information hierarchy and content Presenting your work – digital and print Photographing your work Defining project objectives and rationales – writing and presenting case studies Presentation techniques for one-on-one and one-on-group Presenting for employment versus presenting for freelance work

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To AFCC, Here is a new crosslisted course for approval at the next AFCC meeting on January 20: MACS 337: Taste and Culture (crosslisted with SOC 337). This course was approved on December 15, 2011 by the SCMS Department (of which Media and Communication Studies and Sociology are a part) and is currently going through the pre-UEC consultation process. This course will help expand the upper-level course selection in Media and Communication Studies and Sociology. Attached is the Official Course Outline and the Official Crosslisting Form.Thank you for your time.Janice

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CROSS-LISTED COURSE OUTLINE

CROSS-LISTED COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

This is a cross-listed course. Only one official course outline exists for this course, listed under the original course name and

number. Please refer to the official course outline for full course information. Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

SOC 337 Social, Cultural and Media Studies 4

COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS Taste and Culture

COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

OFFICIAL COURSE OUTLINE:

This is a cross-listed course. Please refer to MACS 337 for the official course outline.

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the concept of taste. Why do we value certain cultural artifacts while we denigrate others? How do our choices reflect who we are? What is “bad taste”? What role do class and subculture play within these notions of taste? This course will investigate theories of aesthetics, identity, subcultures, and taste in such areas as art, film, music, photography, food and advertising. Note: Course is crosslisted with MACS 337. Students cannot take both MACS 337 and SOC 337 for credit.

PREREQUISITES: COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO (department/program): (a) Replaces: SOC 399D (b) Cross-listed with: MACS 337 (c) Cannot take: MACS 337 or SOC 399D for further credit.

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Darren Blakeborough

Department Head: Stephen Piper Date approved: December 15, 2011

Supporting area consultation (Pre-UPAC) Date of meeting: February 3, 20112

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 17, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 1)

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE INFORMATION

Students are advised to keep course outlines in personal files for future use.

Shaded headings are subject to change at the discretion of the department – see course syllabus available from instructor

MACS 337 Social, Cultural and Media Studies 4 COURSE NAME/NUMBER FACULTY/DEPARTMENT UFV CREDITS

Taste and Culture COURSE DESCRIPTIVE TITLE

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the concept of taste. Why do we value certain cultural artifacts while we denigrate others? How do our choices reflect who we are? What is “bad taste”? What role do class and subculture play within these notions of taste? This course will investigate theories of aesthetics, identity, subcultures, and taste in such areas as art, film, music, photography, food and advertising. Note: Course is crosslisted with SOC 337. Students cannot take both MACS 337 and SOC 337 for credit.

PREREQUISITES: 45 credits, to include at least six credits of sociology and/or MACS. COREQUISITES: PRE or COREQUISITES:

SYNONYMOUS COURSE(S): SERVICE COURSE TO: (department/program) (a) Replaces: SOC 399D (b) Cross-listed with: SOC 337 (c) Cannot take: SOC 337 or SOC 399D for further credit.

TOTAL HOURS PER TERM: 60 TRAINING DAY-BASED INSTRUCTION: STRUCTURE OF HOURS: Length of course: Lectures: 45 Hrs Hours per day: Seminar: 15 Hrs Laboratory: Hrs OTHER: Field experience: Hrs Maximum enrolment: 25 Student directed learning: Hrs Expected frequency of course offerings: Every other year. Other (specify): Hrs (every semester, annually, every other year, etc.)

WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (lower-level courses only) Yes No WILL TRANSFER CREDIT BE REQUESTED? (upper-level requested by department) Yes No TRANSFER CREDIT EXISTS IN BCCAT TRANSFER GUIDE: Yes No

COURSE IMPLEMENTATION DATE: May 2012 COURSE REVISED IMPLEMENTATION DATE: COURSE TO BE REVIEWED: September 2018 (four years after UPAC approval) (month, year)

Course designer(s): Darren Blakeborough

Department Head: Stephen Piper Date approved: December 15, 2011

Supporting area consultation (UPACA1) Date of meeting: February 3, 2012

Curriculum Committee chair: Tetsuomi Anzai Date approved: February 12, 2012

Dean/Associate VP: Jacqueline Nolte Date approved:

Undergraduate Program Advisory Committee (UPAC) approval Date of meeting:

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MACS 337 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 2)

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

Recall the history and theories of the philosophy of aesthetics; Describe some of the complex relationships between class and culture in relation to expressions of class as

lowbrow, middlebrow and highbrow; Identify the manners in which subcultures and countercultures relate to and resist the dominant culture; Define how notions of authenticity function in such diverse fields as music and art; Assess the role of the active consumer as a producer of cultural artefacts; Discuss the social function of taste and style in fashion; Identify and illustrate the debates surrounding obscenity and cultural products; Explain the role of the body in investigations of identity; Demonstrate an awareness of concepts related to taste and culture through observation, research, public

speaking, and advanced academic writing.

METHODS: (Guest lecturers, presentations, online instruction, field trips, etc.)

Lectures, guest lectures, group work, student-led presentations. METHODS OF OBTAINING PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT RECOGNITION (PLAR):

Examination(s) Portfolio assessment Interview(s)

Other (specify): Methods will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

PLAR cannot be awarded for this course for the following reason(s): TEXTBOOKS, REFERENCES, MATERIALS:

[Textbook selection varies by instructor. An example of texts for this course might be:]

Selections from:

Attwood, Feona (2007). No Money Shot? Commerce, Pornography and New Sex Taste Cultures.

Bourdieu, P., & Johnson, R. (1993). The Field of Cultural Production: Essays on Art and Literature. New York: Columbia University Press.

Bourdieu, P., & Nice, R. (1984). Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste. London: Routledge.

Crane, Diana (2000). Fashion and Its Social Agendas: Class, Gender and Identity in Clothing. University of Chicago Press.

Fussell, Paul (1983). Class.

Gans, H. J. (1975). Popular Culture and High Culture: An Analysis and Evaluation of Taste. New York: Basic Books.

Graham, G. (2005). Philosophy of the Arts: An Introduction to Aesthetics. London: Routledge.

Gronow, J. (1997). The Sociology of Taste. London: Routledge.

Hebdige, D. (1991). Subculture: The Meaning of Style. London: Routledge.

Hesmondhalgh, D. (January 01, 1999). Indie: The Institutional Politics and Aesthetics of a Popular Music Genre. Cultural Studies, 13, 1, 34-61.

Hume, D. (1757). Four Dissertations: 1: The Natural History of Religion. 2: Of the Passions. 3: Of Tragedy. 4: Of the Standard of Taste. London.

Kammen, M. G. (1999). American Culture, American Tastes: Social Change and the 20th Century. New York: Knopf.

Lieberson, Stanley (2000). A Matter of Taste: How Names, Fashions and Culture Change. Yale.

Mey, K. (2007). Art and Obscenity. London: I.B. Taurus.

Milner, Murray (2004). Freaks, Geeks and Cool Kids: American Teenagers, Schools and The Culture of Consumption.

Rosenberg, B., & White, D. M. (1957). Mass Culture: The Popular Arts in America. Glencoe, Illinois: Free Press.

Twitchell, J. B. (1992). Carnival Culture: The Trashing of Taste in America. New York: Columbia University Press.

Veenstra, G. (July 2005). Can Taste Illumine Class? Cultural Knowledge and Forms of Inequality. Canadian Journal of Sociology, 30, 3, 247-279.

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MACS 337 COURSE NAME/NUMBER

OFFICIAL UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OUTLINE (page 3)

SUPPLIES / MATERIALS:

No extraordinary supplies or materials are required. STUDENT EVALUATION:

[An example of student evaluation for this course might be:]

Book Review: 15% Research Proposal and Annotated Bibliography: 10% Research Paper: 25% Group Presentation: 10% Final Exam: 30% Attendance and Participation: 10% COURSE CONTENT:

[Course content varies by instructor. An example of course content might be:]

Week 1, Introduction to the Course and Classmates

Week 2, Aesthetics

Week 3, Bourdieu and Taste

Week 4, High Culture Vs. Low Culture

Week 5, Authenticity

Week 6, Identity

Week 7, Food

Week 8, Pornography/Violence/Obscenity

Week 9, Fashion

Week 10, Advertising

Week 11, Style and Subcultures

Week 12, Television/Film

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33844 King Road Abbotsford, BC

V2S 7M8 Tel: [604] 504-7441

email: @ufv.ca

M E M O R A N D U M

To: College of Arts Faculty Curriculum & UE Committees From: John Pitcher, Department Head (English) Date: 11 January 2012

Re: Error in prerequisites for English 208 CrWr: Screenwriting It has come to our attention that an error was made in the four year review which passed through the committee last year for this course. The course was submitted to the committees with changes to the prerequisites to bring it in line with other 200 level courses (the course had previously been English 111).

The prerequisites in the calendar currently read: NONE

Prerequisites should have read: English 105 and any first year literature course, ENGL 108 or higher.

Note: We are requesting that the committee waive the 18 month advance notice in this case as the original submission did have these prerequistes reflected in the documentation. The course was sent back to the dept to deal with a clarification and when the minutes were passed from AFCC to UPAC, the prereq changes were missed. The course has not been offered since it was moved from the 100 level (formerly Engl 111) to the 200 level.

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MEMO

1

To: AFCC

From: Dr. Michelle Rhodes, Chair, Geography Department

Date: November 14, 2011

Re: Proposal:

Addition of GEOG 340 to the International Concentration

1. Proposal: International Studies We are proposing the addition of the following courses to the International Studies concentration: GEOG 340: Poverty and Development. This is to correct a simple typo in calendar copy.

Lower-Level 25 credits • Geography 101 • Geography 102 • Geography 140 • Geography 201 or 202 • Geography 240 • Geography 241 or 242 • Geography 250 or 253

Recommended: One course of the following: ANTH 102, ANT 130, ANTH 220, GEOG 211, GEOG 233, HIST 115, HIST 210, HIST 236, HIST 265, LAS 200, POSC 190, POSC 230, POSC 290, SOC 205, SOC 250

Note: Math 104 or 106 or PSYCH 110 required for GEOG 352

Upper-Level 32-33 credits

• Geography 352 • One course in physical geography (GEOG 302, 303, 304, 307, 308, 315, 317,

402, 410, 417) • One course of the following: GEOG 312, 340, 343, 447 • One course of the following: GEOG 362, GEOG 421, GEOG 443, GEOG 447, HIST

314, HIST 357, HIST 385, HIST 464, LAS 312, SCMS 310, SCMS 363, SCMS 463 • One course of the following: GEOG 311, 323, 341, 346 • Geography 433 • Geography 452 or 470 (5 credits) • Electives in upper-level geography: 4 credits

Changes made:

Addition of GEOG 340 to string: “One course of the following: GEOG 312, 340, 343, 447

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Greetings

KPE approved two minors: KPE minor for Arts and General Studies and KPE minor for Science. The Arts and General Studies minor consists of 36 credits and the Science minor consists of 37 credits.

The BGS program committee request that students be able to graduate with either minor if the relevant courses are successfully completed.

During 2010 I had discussions with Dr. Michael Gates, program chair, and Amber Zutz, KPE faculty member and neither saw problems with allowing students to graduate with a KPE minor approved for Bachelor of Science students if the minor requirements were met. In order to formalize this I request AFCC approval so this change can be implemented.

Respectfully,

Mandy KlepicBachelor of General Studies Advisor

Attachment: KPE minors listing

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http://www.ufv.ca/calendar/2011_12/ProgramsF‐L/KPE_MINORS.htm   (Jan 2012)  

Kinesiology minor (for Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies degree students)

yellow highlight = courses used for both minors n/p = no prerequisite

Kinesiology discipline (all courses required)

Course Title Credits

KPE 161 Introduction to Kinesiology (n/p) 3

KPE 170 Basic Human Anatomy (n/p) 4

KPE 266 Exercise and Sport Psychology (30 credits) 3

KPE 268 Introduction to Motor Learning and Control (30 credits) 3

KPE 270 Human Physiology I (KPE 170) 4

KPE 366 Counselling Skills for Fitness Profess (KPE 266, 54 credits) 3

KPE 370 Human Physiology II (KPE 270) 4

KPE 466 Psychological Skills in Sport and Life (KPE 366, 90 credits) 3

Electives

KPE Three KPE courses (at least two upper-level) 9

Program Total 36

Kinesiology minor (for Bachelor of Science degree students)

Kinesiology discipline (all courses required)

Course Title Credits

KPE 163 Bio dynamics of Human Movement (n/p) 4

KPE 170 Basic Human Anatomy (n/p) 4

KPE 215 Introduction to Biomechanics (KPE 170) ( Bio l111/12, Phys 101 recommended)

3

KPE 270 Human Physiology I (KPE 170) 4

KPE 362 Theoretical Exercise Physiology (KPE 163, 170, 54 credits, admission to KPE degree/minor or permission)

3

KPE 365 Physical Growth and Motor Devel. (KPE 170 or Bio 111/112 3

KPE 370 Human Physiology II (KPE 270) 4

KPE 470 Pathophysiology (KPE 370) 3

Electives

KPE Three KPE courses (at least one at upper-level) 9

Program Total 37

 

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