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Andrews 052915

Jul 22, 2016

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  • AN INDEPENDENT PUBLICATION OF COMPRINTMILITARY PUBLICATIONS AT JOINT BASE ANDREWS,MD.

    DCMILITARY.COM FRIDAY, MAY 29, 2015 | VOL. 4 NO. 21

    AIR FORCE NEWS

    11 CONS wins Air Force award, Page 4

    EVENTS

    Fun things to do this weekend,

    Page 2

    COMMENTARY

    US Embassy Singapore, AF team up

    for diplomatic success, Page 2

    811TH AIRMEN AWARDED

    VP SERVICE BADGE

    U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/SENIOR AIRMAN JOSHUA R. M. DEWBERRY

    TheVicePresidential ServiceBadge is awarded toStaff

    Sgt. Peter Velez, former 811Security ForcesSquadron

    NCO in-chargeof vicepresidential aircraft security;

    Staff Sgt. LeonardAntonio, 811SFSvicepresidential

    aircraft security team leader; Staff Sgt. SorhaindoPeter,

    811SFSvicepresidential aircraft security team leader;

    SeniorAirmanAlbert Ritterbeck, 811SFSvicepresi-

    dential aircraft security teammembersat Joint Base

    AndrewsonMay21. Story on page 4.

    BYSENIORAIRMANMARIAHHADDENHAM

    11THWING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

    The 11th Force Support Squadrons Outdoor Rec-

    reation Center is gearing up for their busiest time of

    year and is ready to support Team Andrews members

    summer plans and activities.

    With approximately 3,000 pieces of equipment for

    checkout, outdoor recreation rents out all the supplies

    needed to make the most of the upcoming summer

    months.

    Airmen, especially dorm residents, have a limited

    space to store recreational equipment, said Shelley

    Smoot, 11 FSS recreation specialist. Why not come

    rent a bike or kayak for that hot summer day, and not

    have to worry about where you are going to store it

    Gearingup for thegreat outdoors

    U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO BY SENIOR AIRMAN MARIAH HADDENHAM/

    RELEASED

    About3,000 itemscanbecheckedout fromthe11th

    ForceSupportSquadronsOutdoorRecreationCenter.

    see GREAT, page 3

    BY BOBBY JONES

    STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST

    Pamela Stokes Egg-

    leston, a native of Co-

    lumbia, Md., knows rst-

    hand the benets of yoga,

    through expertise as an

    instructor of 14 years and

    the wife of a veteran.

    She holds a free class-

    es at noon, the third Sun-

    day of each month at the

    Imagine Yoga and Well-

    ness Center in Bowie. A

    second free class is held

    at 4:30 p.m. for non-com-

    bat veterans.

    In my training I focus

    on the breath with move-

    ment with this mindful

    yoga therapy for veter-

    ans, Eggleston said. It

    concentrates on their pos-

    tures with the movement,

    to be here in the present

    mind when performing

    yoga.

    Eggleston said theres

    scientific evidence that

    yoga works with the com-

    bat-stressed population.

    The Naval Institutes of

    Health has done studies,

    a lot of medical journals

    have conducted studies

    with yoga in depression,

    post-traumatic stress dis-

    order and traumatic brain

    VeteransfindpathtopeaceinBowie

    BOBBY JONES/ANDREWS GAZETTE

    Charles Eggelston and Lorinda Fontaine-Farris bring their palms together, greet-

    ing their instructor during a free yoga class for veterans at Imagine Yoga and

    Wellness Center in Bowie, Md.

    see YOGA, page 6

    BY LESLIE C. SMITH

    STAFF WRITER

    Art created by young

    artists from Walt Whit-

    man High School celebrat-

    ing the life of Matthew

    Papirmeister was pub-

    licly debuted at the Fisher

    House Joint Base Andrews

    on May 6. The event was

    made possible through the

    organization Youth Art for

    Healing.

    Youth Art for Healing,

    a nonprofit founded in

    2012, brought the project

    to Fisher House as a way

    to add beauty and inspi-

    ration and also honor the

    memory of a young man

    a U.S. Army Iraq veteran

    who died from injuries

    suffered from being struck

    by a car while helping a

    stranded motorist.

    Matts mother, Jan,

    brought the project to Ja-

    net Grampp, manager of

    the Fisher House Joint

    Base Andrews.

    You can go buy art

    anywhere, any furniture

    store, but it doesnt look

    like this. It doesnt inspire,

    this is all done especially

    for this facility and for the

    families that stay here.

    And they notice it, said

    Grampp.

    Its making a differ-

    ence. The colors are so vi-

    brant but yet still peace-

    ful, Grampp added.

    Several young artists

    took part in the endeavor,

    rendering paintings of ev-

    erything from a portrait of

    Matt, family memories of

    sailing and on the farm to

    the dogs he loved so much.

    Ive always been rela-

    tively interested in art. I

    take art in school. When

    I heard about the club, I

    gured Id join, and it was

    a great project to do. I was

    thrown off at rst by how

    big the canvas was. Id

    Youth Art for Healing exhibit debuts

    at Fisher House Joint Base Andrews

    see HEALING, page 4

  • Andrews Gazette

    2

    Friday, May 29, 2015

    Andrews Gazette is published by Comprint Military

    Publications, 9030 Comprint Court, Gaithersburg,

    Md., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S.

    Air Force or any branch of the United States military.

    The appearance of advertising in these publications,

    including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement

    by the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force or

    the products and services advertised.

    Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for

    purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion,

    sex, national origin, age,martial status, physical handicap, political af-

    filiation or any other nonmerit factor of the purchases, user or patron.

    COMPRINT MILITARY PUBLICATIONS

    Maxine Minar, president

    [email protected]

    John Rives, publisher

    [email protected]

    Tiffany Arnold, page design

    [email protected]

    Leslie Smith, editor

    [email protected]

    Bobby Jones, photographer

    [email protected]

    May 29

    Old Greenbelt Theatre Grand Re-Opening

    6-10 p.m.

    Old Greenbelt Theatre, 129 Centerway, Greenbelt

    The Old Greenbelt Theatre celebrates its grand

    re-opening after a 10-month renovation. The eve-

    ning will feature a 1938 Evening at the Pictures,

    screening the Theatres rst lm. Little Miss Broad-

    way starring Shirley Temple. Admission includes

    popcorn and will reect 1938 prices, 50 cents for

    adults and 25 cents for children. Call 301-329-2034

    or visit www.greenbelttheatre.org.

    May 30

    Beltway BBQ Showdown

    Noon to 7 p.m.

    Tucker Road Athletic Complex, 1770 Tucker

    Road, Fort Washington

    The 9th Annual Beltway BBQ Showdown contest

    highlights the art of barbecuing in Prince Georges

    County and the Mid-Atlantic region. This BBQ

    Showdown is nationally sanctioned by the Kansas

    City Barbeque Society (KCBS)and draws teams

    from the Mid-Atlantic area. More than 5,000 people

    come to celebrate and enjoy the art, music and his-

    tory of barbecue in Prince Georges County, Mary-

    land. Free admission. Call 301-203-6000 or visit

    www.pgparks.com.

    May 30

    Marietta Wine Festival

    11 a.m.-6 p.m.

    Marietta House Museum, 5626 Bell Station Road,

    Glenn Dale

    Join us for this one-of-a-kind event featuring

    local wineries, food vendors, live music and much

    more. ($) Call 301-464-5291 or visit www.history.

    pgparks.com.

    May 31

    Sunday Sunset Concerts: U.S. Navy Country Cur-

    rent

    7-8 p.m.

    Allen Pond Park, 3330 Northview Drive, Bowie

    Enjoy a variety of concerts at Allen Pond Park.

    Concert goers should bring a blanket or chair. Con-

    certs are canceled in case of inclement weather.

    Free. Call 301-809-3011 or visit www.cityofbowie.

    org.

    Hot tickets

    around town

    BY COL. CURTIS WALKER

    SINGAPORE AIR ATTACH

    Singapores founding fa-

    ther, Lee Kuan Yew, recently

    passed away at the age of

    91. Given Lees stature and

    standing, all of us at U.S.

    Embassy Singapore expect-

    ed a large state funeral and

    a high-level U.S. delegation

    would be named and arriv-

    ing soon;the funeralwas just

    a few short days away.

    It didnt take long for

    President Barack Obama

    to select former President

    Bill Clinton to lead our del-

    egation.That meant the em-

    bassy and the Air Force had

    roughly 72 hours to build

    and execute a plan of action

    to support our presidents

    diplomatic mission.

    We knew the complex-

    ity of the movement and the

    compressed timeline meant

    we would have to come to-

    gether quickly as a team,call

    on the sumof our experience,

    and leverage our personal

    and professional relation-

    ships around the world to

    pull off such a tall order.The

    clock was ticking and failure

    was not an option.

    Watching this mission

    come together was like

    watching poetry in motion.

    There were thousands of

    questions that demanded

    answers, countless details to

    be tended toand critical deci-

    sions to be made at scores of

    separate agencies each a

    potential show-stopper.

    Working side by sidewith

    my embassy colleagues as

    the air attach, I watched

    with pride as my fellow Air-

    men didwhat Ive seen them

    do for nearly 30 years: They

    enth