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AN INDEPENDENT PUBLICATION OF COMPRINT MILITARY PUBLICATIONS AT JOINT BASE ANDREWS, MD. DCMILITARY.COM FRIDAY, MAY 1, 2015 | VOL. 4 NO. 17 SPORTS JBA half-marathoners go the distance, Page 3 HEALTH TRICARE: Compound drug coverage revised, Page 4 COMMENTARY Heavy drinking: Highway to disaster, Page 2 AIR FORCE SENDS DISASTER SUPPORT TO NEPAL U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/AIRMAN 1ST CLASS TAYLOR QUEEN Service members load relief supplies for victims of the Nepal earthquake into a C-17 Globemaster III from Joint Base Charleston, S.C., at March Air Force Base, Calif., April 26. The U.S. Agency of International Development’s relief cargo included eight pallets, 59 Los Angeles County Fire Department personnel and five search and rescue dogs. See story on page 5. BY BOBBY JONES STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST Sharon Johnson and her daughter, Brianna Johnson-Simmons, 10, decided to visit the Old Maryland Farm in Wat- kins Regional Park as a relaxing way to spend the rest of their day after Bri- anna’s French horn solo during an ensemble festi- val on April 25. They were pleasantly surprised to find out that the Old Maryland Farm was celebrating its annual Sheep Shearing and Fiber Day. The free educational event treated several visi- tors to sheep shearing, wool spinning, natural dye fiber displays and wool spinning demonstrations. “We had no idea they were having this event. We just decided to come here instead of going directly home,” Johnson said. “We watched the sheep being sheared, wool spin- ning and fabric being made. It was great. I think my daughter might want to be a weaver.” Brianna, a fifth-grade student at Holy Trinity Episcopal Day School of Bowie, noted “I have yarn that I wanted to make hats and a book on how to do all this stuff, but I’ve nev- er really had the patience to finish something,” said Brianna, as she received lessons from Lisa Dupree on a Modern Rigid Heddle Weaving Loom. “Origi- nally, I wanted to go to the playground, but they’re currently building a new one, but it was fun looking at all the animals here.” The Old Maryland Farm is an educational farm facility that features exhibits and displays de- Finding fiber, fun at Old Maryland Farm BOBBY JONES Lisa Dupree dressed in 1800 period style clothing educates youngsters and the parents about the use of modern and antique looms. see FIBER, page 4 BY BOBBY JONES STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST On April 25, C. Eliz- abeth Rieg Regional School proudly held its first ‘Race for Rieg 5K Walk/Run’ in Mitch- ellville. More than 250 combined students, par- ents and family members participated in the race throughout the residen- tial and business com- munity. Patrice Buxton, race director and a special ed- ucation teacher at Rieg, highlighted the impor- tance of the maiden race. “Really the main goal of the race was to build community partner- ships. A lot of the com- munity doesn’t realize that we are the largest special needs school in Prince George’s County. We want to build part- nerships not only with the businesses, but with our neighbors within the community and to really set ourselves apart,” said Buxton. “It takes a vil- lage to raise a child, so by providing these com- munity partnerships and bringing in our neigh- bors, I think that having events like these really helps. Plus, it just gives our students the ben- efits of any other regular child. Special needs chil- dren tend to be neglected sometimes. So being able to do this race really builds camaraderie and allows us to give our stu- dents a unique experi- ence,” Buxton added. All proceeds from the race directly benefit the stu- dents. As the race proceeded Race forges community partnerships BOBBY JONES From left to right: C. Elizabeth Rieg Regional School principal Patrice Watson lauds the support of Jennifer Johnson, who is Rieg’s Parents Teachers Organization president, Kevin Alexander, who is president of Ainsley’s Angels, and Patricia Buxton, the Race for Rieg director. see RACE, page 5 BY LESLIE C. SMITH STAFF WRITER Established in 2011, the Veterans Association of Real Estate Professionals (VAREP) is a nonprofit formed with the mission to increase sustainable homeownership, financial literacy,VA loan awareness and provide economic opportunity for active military and veteran communities. “That’s our main goal; our vision is to provide pro- grams and services to veterans. We’re always advo- cating for homeownership and we’re trying to do it Organization seeks to end homelessness for veterans see VAREP, page 4 BY LESLIE C. SMITH STAFF WRITER The Oxon Hill AF JROTC made live contact with the International Space Station (ISS) at a special event in conjunction with Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) and the East Coast Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen Inc. on April 24. Special guests included William T. Fauntroy, Jr., a documented original Tuskegee Airman, who shared his reflections on the trials and the highlights of his path to becoming a pilot. Acknowledging the many JROTC makes live contact with International Space Station see SPACE, page 3
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  • AN INDEPENDENT PUBLICATION OF COMPRINTMILITARY PUBLICATIONS AT JOINT BASE ANDREWS,MD.

    DCMILITARY.COM FRIDAY, MAY 1, 2015 | VOL. 4 NO. 17

    SPORTS

    JBA half-marathoners

    go the distance, Page 3

    HEALTH

    TRICARE: Compound drug coverage

    revised, Page 4

    COMMENTARY

    Heavy drinking: Highway

    to disaster, Page 2

    AIR FORCE SENDS DISASTER

    SUPPORT TO NEPAL

    U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/AIRMAN 1ST CLASS TAYLOR QUEEN

    Servicemembers load relief supplies for victims of

    theNepal earthquake into aC-17Globemaster III

    from Joint BaseCharleston, S.C., atMarchAir Force

    Base, Calif., April 26. TheU.S. Agency of International

    Developments relief cargo included eight pallets, 59

    LosAngelesCounty Fire Department personnel and

    ve search and rescue dogs. See story on page 5.

    BY BOBBY JONES

    STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST

    Sharon Johnson and

    her daughter, Brianna

    Johnson-Simmons, 10,

    decided to visit the Old

    Maryland Farm in Wat-

    kins Regional Park as a

    relaxing way to spend the

    rest of their day after Bri-

    annas French horn solo

    during an ensemble festi-

    val on April 25.

    They were pleasantly

    surprised to nd out that

    the Old Maryland Farm

    was celebrating its annual

    Sheep Shearing and Fiber

    Day. The free educational

    event treated several visi-

    tors to sheep shearing,

    wool spinning, natural dye

    fiber displays and wool

    spinning demonstrations.

    We had no idea they

    were having this event.We

    just decided to come here

    instead of going directly

    home, Johnson said.

    We watched the sheep

    being sheared, wool spin-

    ning and fabric being

    made. It was great. I think

    my daughter might want

    to be a weaver.

    Brianna, a fth-grade

    student at Holy Trinity

    Episcopal Day School of

    Bowie, noted I have yarn

    that I wanted to make hats

    and a book on how to do

    all this stuff, but Ive nev-

    er really had the patience

    to nish something, said

    Brianna, as she received

    lessons from Lisa Dupree

    on a Modern Rigid Heddle

    Weaving Loom. Origi-

    nally, I wanted to go to the

    playground, but theyre

    currently building a new

    one, but it was fun looking

    at all the animals here.

    The Old Maryland

    Farm is an educational

    farm facility that features

    exhibits and displays de-

    Finding ber, fun at

    OldMaryland Farm

    BOBBY JONES

    Lisa Dupree dressed in 1800 period style clothing educates youngsters and the

    parents about the use of modern and antique looms.

    see FIBER, page 4

    BY BOBBY JONES

    STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST

    On April 25, C. Eliz-

    abeth Rieg Regional

    School proudly held its

    first Race for Rieg 5K

    Walk/Run in Mitch-

    ellville. More than 250

    combined students, par-

    ents and family members

    participated in the race

    throughout the residen-

    tial and business com-

    munity.

    Patrice Buxton, race

    director and a special ed-

    ucation teacher at Rieg,

    highlighted the impor-

    tance of the maiden race.

    Really the main goal

    of the race was to build

    community partner-

    ships. A lot of the com-

    munity doesnt realize

    that we are the largest

    special needs school in

    Prince Georges County.

    We want to build part-

    nerships not only with

    the businesses, but with

    our neighbors within the

    community and to really

    set ourselves apart, said

    Buxton. It takes a vil-

    lage to raise a child, so

    by providing these com-

    munity partnerships and

    bringing in our neigh-

    bors, I think that having

    events like these really

    helps. Plus, it just gives

    our students the ben-

    efits of any other regular

    child. Special needs chil-

    dren tend to be neglected

    sometimes. So being able

    to do this race really

    builds camaraderie and

    allows us to give our stu-

    dents a unique experi-

    ence, Buxton added. All

    proceeds from the race

    directly benefit the stu-

    dents.

    As the race proceeded

    Race forges community partnerships

    BOBBY JONES

    From left to right: C. ElizabethRiegRegional School

    principal PatriceWatson lauds the support of Jennifer

    Johnson,who isRiegsParents TeachersOrganization

    president, KevinAlexander,who is president of Ainsleys

    Angels, andPatriciaBuxton, theRace forRiegdirector.

    see RACE, page 5

    BY LESLIE C. SMITH

    STAFF WRITER

    Established in 2011, the Veterans Association of

    Real Estate Professionals (VAREP) is a nonprot

    formed with the mission to increase sustainable

    homeownership, nancial literacy,VA loan awareness

    and provide economic opportunity for active military

    and veteran communities.

    Thats our main goal; our vision is to provide pro-

    grams and services to veterans. Were always advo-

    cating for homeownership and were trying to do it

    Organization seeks to end

    homelessness for veterans

    see VAREP, page 4

    BY LESLIE C. SMITH

    STAFF WRITER

    The Oxon Hill AF JROTC made live contact with

    the International Space Station (ISS) at a special

    event in conjunction with Amateur Radio on the

    International Space Station (ARISS) and the East

    Coast Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen Inc. on April

    24.

    Special guests includedWilliamT. Fauntroy, Jr., a

    documented original Tuskegee Airman, who shared

    his reections on the trials and the highlights of his

    path to becoming a pilot. Acknowledging the many

    JROTCmakes live contactwith

    International Space Station

    see SPACE, page 3

  • Andrews Gazette

    2

    Friday, May 1, 2015

    Andrews Gazette is published by Comprint Military

    Publications, 9030 Comprint Court, Gaithersburg,

    Md., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S.

    Air Force or any branch of the United States military.

    The appearance of advertising in these publications,

    including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement

    by the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force or

    the products and services advertised.

    Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for

    purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion,

    sex, national origin, age,martial status, physical handicap, political af-

    filiation or any other nonmerit factor of the purchases, user or patron.

    COMPRINT MILITARY PUBLICATIONS

    Maxine Minar, president

    mminar@dcmilitary.com

    John Rives, publisher

    jrives@dcmilitary.com

    Tiffany Arnold, page design

    tarnold@gazette.net

    Leslie Smith, editor

    lsmith@dcmilitary.com

    Bobby Jones, photographer

    bjones@dcmilitary.com

    around town

    May 2-3

    National Harbor Wine and Food Festival

    National Harbor, 137 National Plaza, National

    Harbor

    National Harbor brings together world-renowned

    chefs, artisanal craftsmen, and culinary pioneers

    with thousands of Metro DCs foodies. For tickets

    and more information visit www.wineandfoodnh.

    com or www.nationalharbor.com.($)

    May 2

    16th Annual Harlem Renaissance Festival

    10 a.m.-7 p.m.

    The Columbia Park/Kentland Community Cen-

    ter, 2411 Pinebrook Ave., Landover

    The grounds will be lled with music, art, dis-

    cussions, poetry, health screenings, vendors and

    childrens activities and much more. Free. Call 301-

    918-8418 or visit www.pghrf.org/festival.

    May 2

    Open House on the Waterfront

    9 a.m.-1 p.m.

    Bladensburg Waterfront Park, 4601 Annapolis

    Rd., Bladensburg

    Kick off the spring season and enjoy a fun day

    in the park with free canoeing, kayaking, cycling,

    shing rod, and boat rentals. All necessary rental

    equipment and materials provided. ID required for

    rentals. Rentals available while supplies last. Rent-

    al age restrictions still apply. Last free rental will

    be at 1 p.m. Free. Call 301-779-0371 or visit www.

    pgparks.com.

    May 2

    4th Annual Bostwick Heritage Festival

    10 a.m.-4 p.m.

    Bostwick, 3300 48th St., Bladensburg

    Take a step back in time to the eve of the early

    days of the Port Town Communities and the War

    of 1812. Annually, this program includes farm ani-

    mals, 1800s style childrens games & activities,

    demonstrations of a variety of historic trades and

    more. Free admission. Call 301-887-0777 or visit

    www.anacostiatrails.org.

    May 3

    Six Flags America Cinco De Mayo Celebration

    Six Flags America, 13710 Central Ave., Bowie

    A esta with games, special offers, giveaways

    and more, including an Exclusive Ride Time Event!

    The celebration continues with the sounds, avors

    and fun of Mexico courtesy of Univision! Live music,

    festive cultural performances, delicious specialty

    foods and cool merchandise, plus celebrity appear-

    ances and so much more. ($) Call 301-249-1500 or

    visit www.sixags.com/america.

    Hot tickets

    Dental Screenings

    Military retirees and

    eligible dependents in the

    National Capital Area are

    invited to participate in

    a dental screening pro-

    gram. The 79th Medical

    Wings Advanced Educa-

    tion in General Dentistry

    program at Joint Base

    Andrews and Joint Base

    Anacostia-Bolling is offer-

    ing dental examinations. If

    interested, call the Bolling

    Retiree Activities Ofce at

    202-767-5244, starting at 9

    a.m., June 5. Dental techni-

    cianswill review the callers

    dental history. Selected re-

    tirees will be scheduled for

    examinations at the Bol-

    ling dental clinic, June 12

    and at the Andrews clinic,

    June 24. Col. Jeffrey Den-

    ton, director of residency

    training, said they plan to

    offer examinations to as

    many as 96 people, or 48 at

    each location. Those with

    conditions determined to

    meet the educational needs

    of our residents will be con-

    sidered for appointments,

    probably starting in Octo-

    ber and running through

    next summer. You can ex-

    pect some busy signal,

    Denton said. If your call

    is picked up by a recorder,

    leave your number and the

    call will be returned. Tech-

    nicians will remain until

    all appointments have been

    scheduled.

    Fraud Protection

    Medicare encourages its

    members to help themselves

    by reporting fraud. Identity

    theft happens when some-

    one uses your personal in-

    formation to commit fraud

    or other crimes. Medicare

    fraud takes money from the

    program, resulting in high-

    er health care costs. Report

    fraud abuse at 1-800-269-

    0271.

    No Council

    Meeting

    The Air Force Retiree

    Council, scheduled to meet

    this month at Randolph

    AFB, Texas, was canceled.

    Budget considerations,

    responsible for canceling

    meetings in 2011 and 2013,

    were again believed to be

    a contributing factor. The

    council was established in

    1972 to serve as the Chief

    of Staff s liaison with the

    retiree community. It is

    comprised of co-chairs, 15

    members representing geo-

    graphical regions and two

    at-large positions.Members

    oversee retiree activities in

    100 base ofces. The RAOs

    serve 700,000 Air Force

    retirees, their family mem-

    bers and 103,000 spouses

    enrolled in the Survivor

    Benet Plan.

    The Retiree Activities

    Ofce is open 10 a.m. to 3

    p.m., Monday through Fri-

    day.Visit the ofce in Build-

    ing 1604 at California and

    Colorado Avenues or call

    301-981-2726. Call before

    your visit to ensure a volun-

    teer is on duty.The RAOhas

    a website at www.andrews.

    af.mil.

    Retiree Corner

    The Prince Georges

    County Commission for

    Veterans has developed

    an online survey for veter-

    ans and their families. The

    purpose of the survey is to

    gather information about

    the needs of veterans in

    Prince Georges County

    and how the county, com-

    munity-based organiza-

    tions and citizens can help

    them.

    The Department of

    Family Services, which

    houses the Commission for

    Veterans, is collecting the

    information via Google sur-

    vey. All surveys are anony-

    mous and confidential,

    and can be accessed on the

    Department of Family Ser-

    vices website, www.prince

    georgescountymd.gov/sites/

    Family/Pages/default.aspx.

    Hard copies of the sur-

    vey are available at the

    Department of Family

    Services Ofce, 6420 Allen-

    town Road, Camp Springs.

    The satellite ofce for the

    Maryland Department of

    Veterans Affairs, which is

    located in the same build-

    ing, also has access to hard

    copies and electronic ver-

    sions.

    According the Depart-

    ment of Veteran Affairs,

    more than 61,000 veter-

    ans live in Prince Georges

    County - the largest con-

    centration in the state.

    County Executive Rushern

    L. Baker III is looking to

    develop an Ofce on Veter-

    ans Affairs to assist these

    residents.

    The Commission for

    Veterans meets on the rst

    Monday of the month at 6

    p.m. The meetings are free

    and are open to the pub-

    lic. For more information,

    please contact Carol-Lynn

    Snowden at 301-265-8404.

    Prince Georges County

    Department of Family

    Services

    County: Commission for Veterans survey available online

    BYPAULAHLBERGAND

    CAPT. SHEONTEE FRANK

    81STMEDICALOPERATIONS

    SQUADRON

    Alcohol and Drug Abuse

    Prevention and Treatment

    Program

    Heavy drinking is de-

    ned as consuming ve or

    more standard drinks in one

    sitting. It is also considered

    high risk drinking due to

    the health concerns associ-

    atedwith drinking excessive

    amounts of alcohol. Many

    stories aboutheavydrinking

    are glamorized, not publi-

    cized,or forgottenaltogether,

    so behaviors dont change.

    Heres a story that illus-

    trates the many problems

    and risks associated with

    heavy drinking. Can you

    pick them out? Have you

    been on the Highway to Di-

    saster?

    It was a perfect day on

    theMississippi coast to take

    a swim in the pool, so a Kee-

    sler Air Force Base Airman

    decided to have a party one

    Sunday afternoon at his

    house.He invited someofhis

    buddies over to join him --

    the more the merrier. Some

    of his buddies invited a few

    of their friends to the gath-

    ering, which quickly turned

    into a party. The Airman

    coordinated what everyone

    would bring, including a keg

    of beer,beerpong toplay,and

    music to enjoy.

    By 5 p.m., guests arrived

    and the designated keg op-

    erator was letting the beer

    pour freely for everyonewho

    wanted it without verifying

    the ages of the guests.Other

    attendees brought hard li-

    quor and many were taking

    shots between drinks and

    playing beer pong. The host

    was tired and had gotten

    a little too much sun, so he

    went into the house to take

    a short nap. Several guests

    were hungry so one the

    guests drove to get pizzas

    from a nearby restaurant.

    The impaired driver had

    a friend who had not been

    drinking as much ride along

    with him.The driver had do-

    ne this before and had never

    been arrested for impaired

    driving.

    A young female who had

    been playing beer pong was

    noticeably intoxicated near

    the pool. One of the guests

    asked her if she was OK,

    but she did not respond,

    so he yelled for someone to

    call 911. Some of the guests

    left in a hurry. Meanwhile,

    a neighbor called local law

    enforcement due to the loud

    music and noise.

    There were many mis-

    takes made throughout the

    course of the afternoon and

    theconsequencesweregreat.

    This scenario identied is-

    sues of underage drinking,

    contributing alcohol to mi-

    nors,public intoxication,and

    driving under the inuence.

    Most importantly this sce-

    nario illustrates the lack of

    wingmanship.

    Here are tips for respon-

    sible party planning:

    zPlan ahead.

    z Have a non-drinking

    designated driver.

    zLimit drinking.

    z Check identication to

    prevent underage drinking.

    zBe a responsible host.

    z Provide food, activity

    and oversight.

    z Offer water and non-

    alcoholic beverages.

    z Leave your vehicle at

    home.

    zKnow your guests.

    z Ensure guests have a

    safe way home.

    z Remember 0-0-1-3.

    That means 0 underage

    drinking, 0 drinking and

    driving, 1 drink per hour, no

    more than 3 drinks per sit-

    ting.

    z Call a taxi or Airman

    Against Drunk Driving at

    your installation for a safe

    ride home.

    Commentary

    Heavy drinking: Highway to disaster

  • Andrews Gazette

    Friday, May 1, 2015

    3

    BY SENIOR AIRMAN

    MARIAH HADDENHAM

    11TH WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

    Approximately 150 run-

    ners participated in the

    third annual Joint Base

    Andrews Half-Marathon on

    April 18.

    The race ended with an

    awards ceremony hosted

    by Col. Hoagland, who also

    participated in the race

    Seasoned runners and rst-

    timers competed.

    This was my rst time

    running this particular

    race, said Airman 1st Class

    Joshua Islas, 11th Wing

    Staff Agency administra-

    tion technician. I just love

    running. I have run two full

    marathons and a few other

    small marathons, but I will

    denitely be running this

    half-marathon next year.

    The event coincided with

    the Amazing Base Fam-

    ily Festival, which included

    family entertainment and

    food. We came to support

    my husband who is running

    the half marathon, but we

    also got to enjoy the activi-

    ties and spend family time

    with him after he crossed

    the nish line, said Adri-

    ana Odusanya, an Air Force

    spouse.

    Joint Base Andrews goes the distance

    U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/SENIOR AIRMAN MARIAH HADDENHAM

    Runners begin the Joint Base Andrews Half-Marathon, April 18, at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland. This was the third annual half-marathon

    held at JBA and the race had approximately 150 participants. First place runners in the men and womens category were Philip Blong, with

    a time of 1:22:41, and Mary Kay Robinson, with a time of 1:39:32.

    events he had seen in his

    lifetime and the numer-

    ous opportunities that lie

    ahead for the youth in-

    volved in the program, he

    concluded, You dont know

    how proud I am of what

    youre about to do.

    Were just so enthused

    that the young people not

    only have the opportunity

    but take advantage of the

    opportunity to prepare

    themselves for the future

    in aviation. Its one of

    those things that God has

    blessed me to be here to

    talk to young people; and

    what we say will impress

    them to the point that

    whatever dream they have

    they can succeed, Faun-

    troy said.

    Major Anderson,

    shared, I was really im-

    pressed by what I saw

    today. I consider myself

    and Faunteroy as pio-

    neers of past history, but

    what I saw today were the

    pioneers of future history.

    These cadets made me

    think these could be our

    future astronauts; and Im

    just glad to be here today

    to witness that and to be a

    part of it.

    Being 90 years of age I

    consider it a great blessing

    to let the children know

    they can be anything they

    want to be these days; they

    dont have the same barri-

    ers to overcome; the eld is

    wide open now, Anderson

    concluded.

    As students from the

    Oxon Hill High School sat

    in the audience, 12 cadets

    from AFJROTC had the

    opportunity to ask ques-

    tions of Italian European

    Space Agency Astronaut

    Samanatha Cristoforetti

    the the rst Italian wom-

    an in space. The students

    had 10minutes in which to

    ask their questions as the

    station passed over Green-

    belt. She answered their

    questions ranging from

    her journey to becoming

    an astronaut to daily life

    on the ISS, to technical

    and scientic questions re-

    garding the ISS.

    The participants are

    part of the JROTC Avia-

    tion Program, in conjunc-

    tion with the East Coast

    Chapter of the Tuskegee

    Airmen Inc. One of the

    students who soloed pi-

    loted an airplane in the

    program, Cadet/2Lt. Mon-

    ika Talastas, shared her

    thoughts about the days

    event, I think it was a

    really good experience. I

    think it was really impor-

    tant.

    Technology and space

    is something that is al-

    ways advancing. I think

    it was really cool, said

    Talastas, who is headed to

    school for mechanical engi-

    neering with an aerospace

    concentration.

    Im just blessed, Ca-

    det/CMSgt Hannah An-

    breal Monroe expressed.

    I am beyond happy. It was

    overwhelming; it was so

    enjoyable.

    I think its a very good

    experience, not many

    schools get to do it. I think

    its great that we Oxon

    Hill got a chance to do it.

    It was great for exposing

    the students to the STEM

    elds. We have a lot of

    STEM programs here; but

    we get to see it in action.

    They get to see what they

    might want to be a part of

    as they explore what they

    want to do with their ca-

    reer, said Cadet Col. Ter-

    rence Christian.

    I was already inter-

    ested in the engineering

    eld; now I think I want to

    change to something aero-

    space related, Christian

    added.

    I never heard of this

    happening, once they came

    to our school we all jumped

    on board and we were very

    interested. I think the

    school got something out

    it; all the cadets were very

    eager to come and watch

    us make contact with the

    International Space Sta-

    tion, said Christian.

    This experience means

    a lot because when I was

    little I always thought

    about space and getting to

    talk to someone in space. It

    was really incredible, said

    Cadet Lt. Col Aric Catim-

    bang If you work hard you

    get to do special things like

    this.

    Col. Marc Branche, Se-

    nior Aerospace Instruc-

    tor AF JRTOC, shared, I

    think they did a great job.

    I thought today went very

    well. I think, it was a good

    example to the students,

    the parents and every-

    body who came, as well as,

    those that tapped into the

    live stream, the technology

    that can be used to talk to

    people so far away going so

    fast. The fact that you can

    talk to an astronaut live in

    space is actually fantastic;

    and that is the same type

    of technology that can be

    used when they go further

    perhaps even Mars.

    The event was spon-

    sored by NASA, Radio

    Amateur Satellite Corpo-

    ration (AMSAT-NA) Amer-

    ican Radio Relay League

    and Prince Georges Coun-

    ty Public Schools.

    LESLIE C. SMITH

    The East Coast Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, one of the sponsors of the days

    event, were on hand to experience the live contact between the International

    Space Station and students from Oxon Hill AF JROTC Aviation Program.

    SPACE, from page 1

  • Andrews Gazette

    4

    Friday, May 1, 2015

    signed to familiarize the

    public with the farming

    experience.

    Patrice Gribble-Fetter,

    Maryland-National Capi-

    tal Park & Planning Com-

    mission Park Naturalist,

    noted the Shearing Day

    event is held every year

    on the third Saturday in

    April.

    We have to shear our

    animals by the end of

    April because they start

    getting hot with the sum-

    mer coming. We get all

    the heavy wool off that

    kept them warm during

    the winter and make sure

    theyre nice and cool for

    the summer, said Fetter.

    Its also a great way of

    bringing people out to the

    farm in the springtime

    and show them tradition-

    al farming methods, like

    growing vegetables and

    fruits for the animals and

    just having a good time,

    said Fetter.

    The farm also boasts a

    bee and buttery gardens

    for programs and produce

    and herb gardens. We

    used to grow tobacco, but

    we still grow cotton, which

    can be seen in some of our

    displays. Were hoping to

    get more people to come

    out next year.

    Fetter who has a bach-

    elors degree in animal

    science from the Univer-

    sity of Maryland, associ-

    ate degrees in biology and

    teaching, noted she al-

    ways wanted to teach kids

    and work with animals.

    Those degrees work

    together and enable me

    to do both, said Fetter,

    who once worked in the

    Australian exhibit at the

    National Aquarium in

    Baltimore as a biological

    technician. But I really

    enjoy coming to work here

    more. Ive been here since

    2001.

    Fetter stressed while

    the facility is free and

    open to the public, it is an

    educational facility, not a

    petting zoo or a produc-

    tion farm.

    We dont send our ani-

    mals out to market. For

    the most part our animals

    stay here until theyre old

    and gray. To that advan-

    tage we do a lot of school

    programs, special needs

    programs and we have a

    lot of visitors who come

    in and interact with the

    animals, which we moni-

    tor for the safety of the

    animals and the visitors,

    Fetter said.

    Each of us has differ-

    ent backgrounds. One of

    our staff members has cer-

    tication in therapeutic

    riding, working with the

    disabled, Fetter added.

    Therapeutic riding uses

    equine-assisted activities

    for the purpose of contrib-

    uting positively to cogni-

    tive, physical, emotional

    and social well-being of

    people with disabilities.

    Jess Hardy, our sheep

    shearer, has a degree from

    Delaware Valley Univer-

    sity in agriculture and a

    life-time of sheep expe-

    rience. We have a small

    staff of professionals, Fet-

    ter said.

    Originally the Old

    Maryland facility was

    used by the Maryland

    Park Police Mounted

    units who had their hors-

    es in the stables located

    on the grounds in the ear-

    ly 1970s.

    Today, the facility

    serves as an educational

    facility, with approximate-

    ly 70 different animals,

    including goats, sheep,

    chickens, rabbits, peafowl,

    turkeys, hogs, ponies, don-

    key, calf, steer and Appa-

    loosa ponies, and a llama.

    Visitors can assist in

    feeding the animals Tues-

    day through Sunday at

    noon. Its free and open

    to the public, Tuesday

    through Friday, 10 am-

    2:30 p.m. Sat-Sun 11:30

    a.m.-4:30 p.m. The farm

    also offers birthday par-

    ties, pony rides, hay rides,

    and farm demonstrations.

    For more information

    about Old Maryland Farm

    events, call 301-218-6770.

    FIBER, from page 1

    one veteran at a time, said

    Christine Olfus, VAREP

    government Affairs.

    At the VAREP Annual

    conference, with chapters

    from across the country in

    attendance, participants

    travel to Capitol Hill to

    meet with their congress-

    man and senators.

    We would like to be

    the voice that is missing;

    we want them to see how

    veterans are existing

    many of whom dont know

    their benets or arent us-

    ing their benets for vari-

    ous reason. During their

    transition into civilian life

    they are aware of certain

    things but really not the

    home buying process, Ol-

    fus said.

    There is a lot of work

    that needs to be done to

    end homelessness. Our

    mission is to increase sus-

    tainable homeownership.

    We advocate nationally for

    programs to reduce barri-

    ers.

    We encourage nancial

    institutions to make the

    process easier for the vet-

    eran community. We want

    professional membership

    real estate professionals

    and nancial to be em-

    powered and understand

    how to work with veterans,

    all about the VA loan. And

    we also collaborate with

    organizations for job cre-

    ation as well, Olfus said.

    The organization con-

    ducts numerous communi-

    ty outreach programs. One

    of the larger programs is

    the Housing Summit they

    hold twice a year. At the

    summit financial educa-

    tion sessions are conduct-

    ed with attorneys on site to

    answer questions and sev-

    eral banks on hand to run

    credit checks and qualify

    on the spot for mortgages.

    VAREP is hosting a

    Stars and Stripes Veteran

    Charity Golf Tournament

    on May 19 to raise funds

    to support their communi-

    ty outreach programs such

    as the housing summit.

    Golfers can still sign up

    for golf tournament. The

    entry fee includes green

    fees, a cart fee, driving ball,

    lunch and tickets to the

    awards banquet dinner. If

    you dont want to golf, but

    would like to network, you

    can attend the dinner. A

    car will be given away for

    a hole-in-one.

    Registration starts at

    11:30.

    In encouraging people

    to participate, Olfus added,

    You will be contributing to

    worthy cause. [Homeless-

    ness] is in our face all the

    time; we see homeless peo-

    ple all the time in this area

    and often they aremilitary.

    This event really does

    help our organization to

    help bring people off the

    streets if come to policy

    conference in June will see

    giving away two homes to

    veterans one came to the

    housing summit in Decem-

    ber. They get to realize an

    immediate return on their

    investment and have a

    great time also.

    To register for the

    event, visit www.VAREP.

    net/StarsandStripes.

    The next VAREP Hous-

    ing Summit is planned for

    later summer/fall. If you

    are interested in learn-

    ing more, visit VAREP.net

    and check the local events

    calendar. The organization

    is also looking for donated

    space in which to hold

    the summit, contact them

    through their website as

    well.

    VAREP, from page 1

    BY LT. COL.

    GLENN L. LAIRD

    PHARMACY FLIGHT

    COMMANDER

    Starting today, Express

    Scripts, the TRICARE

    pharmacy contractor, will

    screen all ingredients in

    compound drug claims to

    ensure they are safe and

    effective, and covered by

    TRICARE. This screening

    process is similar to the

    current TRICARE pro-

    cess for other prescription

    drugs, but it now applies

    to the ingredients in com-

    pound drugs, as well.

    Compound drugs are

    a combination of drug in-

    gredients prepared by a

    pharmacist for a patients

    individual needs. TRI-

    CARE beneciaries tak-

    ing a compound drug will

    soon receive a letter ex-

    plaining the new process

    for screening compound

    drugs, and what steps

    they should follow.

    The Defense Health

    Agencys highest priority

    is to provide our bene-

    ciaries safe and effective

    care while being respon-

    sible stewards of taxpayer

    dollars. Many compound

    drugs will still be covered

    because they include in-

    gredients proven to be

    safe, and most benecia-

    ries will experience no

    delay in getting their pre-

    scriptions.

    For more information

    about TRICARE cover-

    age of compound drugs,

    visit www.tricare.mil/Com

    poundDrugs.

    TRICARE: Compound

    drug coverage revised

    BOBBY JONES

    A779thMedicalSupportSquadronpharmacy techni-

    ciancountspillsat theMalcolmGrowMedicalClinics

    andSurgeryCenterPharmacy. Thepharmacyadminis-

    tersmore than350,000medicationsannually.

    1051007B

  • Andrews Gazette

    Friday, May 1, 2015

    5

    through the residential areas,

    people emerged from their

    homes to cheer the students

    on. At the conclusion of the

    race, the participants gath-

    ered in front of the school for

    the awards ceremony.

    Every year this race will

    get a little better, and I hope

    everyone out here will be here

    next year. Were so grateful

    for you allowing our students

    that could not move physically

    to be able to participate. For

    our first 5K race, you did the

    dag gone thing, said Patrice

    F. Watson, Riegs principal.

    Jennifer Johnson, Parents

    Teachers Organization presi-

    dent, said, It was a wonderful

    opportunity to get some expo-

    sure for the school and to give

    specials needs students an

    opportunity to come out and

    take part in events of this na-

    ture, Johnson said.

    The following runners com-

    peted and placed in the Stu-

    dent Category: rst place: Tay-

    lor Davis (39 min. 18 sec.), sec-

    ond place: Brianna Spicer (40

    min. 28 sec.) and third place:

    Robert Howre (42 min. 41 sec.).

    At the conclusion of the

    event, Kevin Alexander, Ain-

    sleys Angels president, made

    a surprise donation of $2,500

    and two advanced mobility

    running strollers to support

    next years race. One of the

    strollers was actually used in

    the race. Ainsleys Angels is a

    nonprofit organization geared

    toward supporting special

    needs schools, programs and

    organizations.

    Were really excited to get

    the ball rolling with start-up

    costs for next years event,

    said Buxton.

    PHOTOS BY BOBBY JONES

    Several students, parents and family participants listen to closing

    remarks of the race.

    RACE, from page 1

    PatriceWatson,C. Elizabeth

    RiegRegional School principal,

    congratulates rst placewinner

    BY DOD NEWS

    DEFENSE MEDIA ACTIVITY

    The U.S. has sent an Air

    Force aircraft to Nepal to

    deliver personnel and cargo

    in support of disaster-relief

    operations, according to Pen-

    tagon spokesman Army Col.

    Steve Warren.

    A 7.9-magnitude earth-

    quake hit the country April

    25, reportedly leaving almost

    2,500 dead, about 6,000 in-

    jured and thousands more

    still missing. In addition,

    thousands of people are cur-

    rently reported to be without

    food, water or shelter.

    This morning at approxi-

    mately 11:18 a.m., a U.S.

    Air Force C-17 Globemaster

    (III) departed from Dover Air

    Force Base bound for Nepal,

    Warren said in a statement

    released April 26. The air-

    craft is transporting nearly 70

    personnel, including a USAID

    Disaster Assistance Response

    Team, the Fairfax County Ur-

    ban Search and Rescue team

    and several journalists, along

    with 45 square tons of cargo.

    The flight is expected to

    arrive at Tribhuvan Interna-

    tional Airport in Kathmandu,

    Nepal, on April 27, according

    to Warren.

    The initial estimated cost

    for the U.S. Defense Depart-

    ments support is approxi-

    mately $700,000, and there

    are currently no additional

    requests for DOD support, of-

    ficials said on background.

    There are 26 DOD person-

    nel and one U.S. C-130 Hercu-

    les in Nepal who were there

    to conduct a previously sched-

    uled training exercise. All

    DOD personnel in Nepal are

    accounted for, officials said.

    AF aircraft sends

    disaster-assistance

    support to Nepal

    Pentagon:45square tonsofcargo,70

    peoplesent tohelpearthquakevictims

    1050779

  • 6Friday, May 1, 2015

    Military spouses are

    stepping up, from the

    school board to the Sen-

    ate. Instead of just call-

    ing their Representatives,

    military spouses are ask-

    ing, Why cant I be the

    Representative? Home-

    front Rising encourages

    that mindset and pre-

    pares military spouses

    to take the next steps to

    serving in public office

    with a one-day seminar

    on May 6 at The Army

    Navy Club.

    From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,

    with registration opening

    at 8:30, the educational

    seminar will provide in-

    formation and resources

    needed to pursue roles in

    local, state, and national

    politics.

    Kathleen Shanahan,

    who was chief of staff to

    former Florida Gov. Jeb

    Bush, will provide her

    insights and advice on

    how military spouses can

    engage in the political

    process. Military spouse

    and former Michigan

    Secretary of State candi-

    date Jocelyn Benson will

    share her experiences

    and encouragement. At-

    tendees will also hear

    messages from currently

    serving military spouses,

    including U.S. Rep. Cathy

    McMorris Rodgers and

    Indiana Senator Amanda

    Banks.

    After the training and

    encouragement received

    from the seminars in

    Washington, D.C.; Tampa,

    Florida; and San Diego,

    California, attendees

    have gone on to work on

    local campaigns, served

    on the boards of commu-

    nity organizations, and

    engaged in the political

    process across the coun-

    try. Homefront Rising re-

    turns to D.C. for another

    educational event tailored

    specifically for military

    spouses looking to serve

    in public ofce.

    Homefront Rising is a

    joint effort of In Gear Ca-

    reer for Military Spouses

    and the Military Spouse

    JD Network.

    Homefront Rising

    Military spouses on

    the rise to public ofce

    Prior Homefront Rising attendees participate in a

    communications exercise.

    JBA AIRMEN HONORED FOR

    AIR FORCE INSTALLATION

    EXCELLENCE

    U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/AIRMAN 1ST CLASS RYAN J. SONNIER

    The 2015 special recognition nominees receive

    certicates during a ceremony at The Courses at

    Andrews, Joint Base Andrews on April 22.

    1039524

  • Friday, May 1, 2015

    7

  • 8Friday, May 1, 2015

    1051004