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AN INDEPENDENT PUBLICATION OF COMPRINT MILITARY PUBLICATIONS AT JOINT BASE ANDREWS, MD. DCMILITARY.COM FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 | VOL. 4 NO. 5 COMMUNITY NEWS MNCPPC celebrate county's century old history, Page 3 ENTERTAINMENT The Publick Playhouse offers musical flight of jazz, blues fusion, Page 6 COMMENTARY I really shouldn't be here, Page 2 BY BOBBY JONES STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST The Southern Techni- cal/Recreation Complex (STRC) in Fort Washington was buzzing with hundreds of eager young Lego ro- botic creators from Prince George’s County during the 2015 Maryland 'For In- spiration and Recognition of Science and Technology,' (FIRST) Robotics Competi- tion Lego League Robotics Competition Qualifier Jan. 31. Jointly sponsored by STRC and MD FIRST, the free competition saw more than 18 local First Lego Leagues (FLL) teams for students age 9-14 partici- pate and qualify for the State FLL Championship. There are five competi- tive competitions based on age which include the FIRST Place for ages six to adult; the Junior FIRST Lego League for students PHOTO/BOBBY JONES Aaron “AJ” Lewis, volunteer referee, observes a robot perform missions, while one team member cringes. Lewis is the son of Denise Lewis, US FIRST Regional Director, Washington, D.C. He started out as a competi- tor in the FIRST program and has just been accepted to the Naval Academy for a full scholarship. He wants to become an electrical engineer. Student-built Lego bots battle for dominance BY AIRMAN 1ST CLASS RYAN J. SONNIER 11TH WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS The 11th Wing Le- gal Office will not host a tax center for military members this year, however on- line resources are still available. According to Capt. Marissa Savells, 11th Wing assistant staff judge advocate, the Andrews Tax Center will not open due to fiscal restraints. In the past, more than 40 active-duty Airmen volunteered their time to help man the tax center. Unfortunately, this option is no longer feasible. “Even though we aren’t offering tax preparation this year, military families can still file their taxes, for free, online at vari- ous websites,” Savells said. “However, attor- neys may still be able to provide assistance with basic personal tax-related questions.” To find various on- line resources, military members can utilize militaryonesource.mil. Military One Source also advises members on how to be smart with their returns once they receive them and put the money toward carefully planned pur- chases, reducing debt, or using it as a “finan- cial cushion.” When filing online, members should have all relevant documents readily available. Documents include W- 2s/1099-Rs, 1098-Es JBA Tax Center closes see TAX, page 4 see LEGO, page 4 BY BOBBY JONES STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST Remember the T.V. com- mercial where the camel asks his human coworkers the annoying, yet rhetori- cal question, “Guess what daaaay it is?” The cowork- ers all reluctantly answer I don’t know. The camel re- plies, “Hump Daaaaay!” January 28, which falls on Hump Day Wednesday, was also the unofficial Na- tional Have Fun at Work Day. The Andrews Gazette hit the streets and visited various local companies in Prince George’s County to see how they promote fun in the work environment. Brandon Nelson, a Mc- Donald’s restaurant man- ager in Camp Springs noted, “My team likes to compete against each other by seeing how fast they can service our customers. It’s a lot of fun and I reward the fastest and most efficient worker,” said Nelson. “I’ve been here for only five months, but they seem to like it and it lightens the work load.” In Marlow Heights, Tina Prince Georgians celebrate ‘National Have Fun at Work Day’ PHOTO/BOBBY JONES Brandon Nelson, McDon- ald’s manager in Camp Springs, promotes fun in the work place by holding competitive games for workers. see WORK, page 5 MAX IMPACT KICKS-OFF SUPER BOWL SUNDAY U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/ SENIOR AIRMAN NESHA HUMES Tech Sgt. Robert Smith, U.S. Air Force rock band Max Impact percussionist, plays for Super Bowl XLIX fans at Westgate Entertainment District in Glendale, Az., Feb. 1. See story on page 7.
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  • AN INDEPENDENT PUBLICATION OF COMPRINTMILITARY PUBLICATIONS AT JOINT BASE ANDREWS,MD.

    DCMILITARY.COM FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2015 | VOL. 4 NO. 5

    COMMUNITY NEWS

    MNCPPC celebrate county's century old history, Page 3

    ENTERTAINMENT

    The Publick Playhouse offers musical

    ight of jazz, blues fusion, Page 6

    COMMENTARY

    I really shouldn't be here,

    Page 2

    BY BOBBY JONES

    STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST

    The Southern Techni-

    cal/Recreation Complex

    (STRC) in FortWashington

    was buzzing with hundreds

    of eager young Lego ro-

    botic creators from Prince

    Georges County during

    the 2015 Maryland 'For In-

    spiration and Recognition

    of Science and Technology,'

    (FIRST) Robotics Competi-

    tion Lego League Robotics

    Competition Qualier Jan.

    31.

    Jointly sponsored by

    STRC and MD FIRST, the

    free competition saw more

    than 18 local First Lego

    Leagues (FLL) teams for

    students age 9-14 partici-

    pate and qualify for the

    State FLL Championship.

    There are ve competi-

    tive competitions based

    on age which include the

    FIRST Place for ages six

    to adult; the Junior FIRST

    Lego League for students

    PHOTO/BOBBY JONES

    Aaron AJ Lewis, volunteer referee, observes a robot performmissions, while one teammember cringes.

    Lewis is the son of Denise Lewis, US FIRST Regional Director, Washington, D.C. He started out as a competi-

    tor in the FIRST program and has just been accepted to the Naval Academy for a full scholarship. He wants to

    become an electrical engineer.

    Student-built Lego bots

    battle for dominance

    BY AIRMAN 1ST

    CLASS

    RYAN J. SONNIER

    11TH WING

    PUBLIC AFFAIRS

    The 11th Wing Le-

    gal Office will not

    host a tax center for

    military members

    this year, however on-

    line resources are still

    available.

    According to Capt.

    Marissa Savells, 11th

    Wing assistant staff

    judge advocate, the

    Andrews Tax Center

    will not open due to

    fiscal restraints. In

    the past, more than

    40 active-duty Airmen

    volunteered their time

    to help man the tax

    center. Unfortunately,

    this option is no longer

    feasible.

    Even though we

    arent offering tax

    preparation this year,

    military families can

    still file their taxes,

    for free, online at vari-

    ous websites, Savells

    said. However, attor-

    neys may still be able

    to provide assistance

    with basic personal

    tax-related questions.

    To nd various on-

    line resources, military

    members can utilize

    militaryonesource.mil.

    Military One Source

    also advises members

    on how to be smart

    with their returns once

    they receive them and

    put the money toward

    carefully planned pur-

    chases, reducing debt,

    or using it as a nan-

    cial cushion.

    When ling online,

    members should have

    all relevant documents

    readily available.

    Documents include W-

    2s/1099-Rs, 1098-Es

    JBA

    Tax

    Center

    closes

    see TAX, page 4

    see LEGO, page 4

    BY BOBBY JONES

    STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST

    Remember the T.V. com-

    mercial where the camel

    asks his human coworkers

    the annoying, yet rhetori-

    cal question, Guess what

    daaaay it is? The cowork-

    ers all reluctantly answer I

    dont know. The camel re-

    plies, Hump Daaaaay!

    January 28, which falls

    on Hump Day Wednesday,

    was also the unofcial Na-

    tional Have Fun at Work

    Day.

    The Andrews Gazette

    hit the streets and visited

    various local companies in

    Prince Georges County to

    see how they promote fun in

    the work environment.

    Brandon Nelson, a Mc-

    Donalds restaurant man-

    ager inCampSprings noted,

    My team likes to compete

    against each other by seeing

    how fast they can service

    our customers. Its a lot of

    fun and I reward the fastest

    and most efcient worker,

    said Nelson. Ive been here

    for only five months, but

    they seem to like it and it

    lightens the work load.

    In Marlow Heights, Tina

    PrinceGeorgians celebrate

    NationalHaveFunatWorkDay

    PHOTO/BOBBY JONES

    Brandon Nelson, McDon-

    alds manager in Camp

    Springs, promotes fun in

    the work place by holding

    competitive games for

    workers.

    seeWORK, page 5

    MAX IMPACT KICKS-OFF

    SUPER BOWL SUNDAY

    U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/ SENIOR AIRMAN NESHA HUMES

    Tech Sgt. Robert Smith, U.S. Air Force rock band

    Max Impact percussionist, plays for Super Bowl

    XLIX fans at Westgate Entertainment District in

    Glendale, Az., Feb. 1. See story on page 7.

  • Andrews Gazette

    2

    Friday, February 6, 2015

    Andrews Gazette is published by Comprint Military

    Publications, 9030 Comprint Court, Gaithersburg,

    Md., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S.

    Air Force or any branch of the United States military.

    The appearance of advertising in these publications,

    including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement

    by the Department of Defense, the Department of the Air Force or

    the products and services advertised.

    Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for

    purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion,

    sex, national origin, age,martial status, physical handicap, political af-

    filiation or any other nonmerit factor of the purchases, user or patron.

    COMPRINT MILITARY PUBLICATIONS

    Maxine Minar, president

    mminar@dcmilitary.com

    John Rives, publisher

    jrives@dcmilitary.com

    Deirdre Parry, page design

    dparry@gazette.net

    Leslie Smith, editor

    lsmith@dcmilitary.com

    Bobby Jones, photographer

    bjones@dcmilitary.com

    Through February 28

    Glancing Back & Looking Forward: 100 Years of

    African American Culture and History in Prince

    Georges County, Maryland

    Montpelier Arts Center, 9652 Muirkirk Road,

    Laurel, MD 20708

    This exhibition features information about the

    lives of selected Prince Georgians who had a vari-

    ety of occupations and community roles. Through

    photographs, artifacts, and excerpts from inter-

    views, Everyday People Making History will con-

    vey the personal stories of participants and high-

    light the ways in which they were and still are

    a part of history in Prince Georges County. Free.

    Call 301-377-7800 or visit www.pgpparks.com.

    February 1-28

    The Full Story: Maryland, The Surratts, and

    The Crime of the Century

    Wednesday-Friday 11 a.m. 3 p.m.

    Saturday and Sunday noon4 p.m.

    Surratt House Museum, 9118 Brandywine

    Road, Clinton, MD 20735

    Surratt House commemorates the 150th anni-

    versary of the end of the American Civil War with

    an exhibit reflecting the role of Maryland in the

    conflict, the choices made by the Surratt family,

    and the after effects on the family and the nation.

    Call 301-868-1121 or visit www.history.pgparks

    .com

    Feb. 6- Feb 22

    I Hate Hamlet

    Bowie Playhouse, 16500 White Marsh Park

    Drive, Bowie, Md.

    Friday, Saturday 8 p.m., Sunday 3 p.m.

    2nd Star Productions comedic offering that fol-

    lows television star Andrew Rally on a quest to

    become a "true" actor helped or hampered by his

    agent, friends and the ghost of John Barrymore.

    Tickets cost $19 to $22. Call 410-757-5700 or 301-

    832-4819 or visit www.2ndstarproductions.com.

    February 7

    The Brentwood Arts Exchange All-Screened

    Video Fest

    Noon

    Brentwood Arts Exchange, 3901 Rhode Island

    Ave., Brentwood, MD 20722

    Join us as we bring independent video in all its

    forms, from great storytelling to experimental im-

    agery, in the welcoming down-to-earth atmosphere

    youve come to know us for. ($) Call 301-277-2863

    or visit www.arts.pgparks.com

    Hot tickets

    about town

    Doolittle Raider Dies

    Retired Lt. Col. Edward Saylor,

    one of four surviving Doolittle Raid-

    ers, died in Sumner, Wash. He was

    94.He was a young ight engineer-

    gunner and among the 80 airmen

    who volunteered to y the risky

    mission that sent 16 B-25 bomb-

    ers from a carrier at sea to attack

    Tokyo, April 28, 1942. Three crew

    members died as Raiders bailed out

    or crash-landed their planes in Chi-

    na, but most were helped to safety

    by Chinese villagers and soldiers.

    Of eight Raiders captured by Japa-

    nese soldiers, three were executed

    and another died in captivity. Colo-

    nel Saylor grew up on a ranch in

    Brusett, Mont. He enlisted in the

    Army Air Corps in 1939 and served

    28 years. Last year, the Raiders

    received the Congressional Gold

    Medal.

    Expedited Burial

    Payments

    New burial regulations allow

    Veterans Affairs (VA) to automati-

    cally pay the maximum amount al-

    lowable under law to most eligible

    surviving spouses, without the need

    of a written application. Previously,

    burial benets were paid on a re-

    imbursement basis on submitted

    receipts. This automation enables

    VA to pay burial allowances to an

    estimated 62,000 eligible surviving

    spouses out of a projected 140,000

    claimants for burial benets this

    year. Spouses will be paid upon no-

    tice of the veterans death using in-

    formation maintained by VA. Buri-

    al allowance for a nonservice-con-

    nected death is $300 and $2,000 for

    death connected to military service.

    For more information on monetary

    burial benets, call 1 800 827-1000.

    Increased SGLI Premiums

    The Servicemembers? Group

    Life Insurance (SGLI) program

    has adjusted its monthly premium

    rate to 7 cents per $1,000 to main-

    tain the program?s strong nan-

    cial position. Since the start of the

    SGLI Program in 1965, monthly

    premiums have decreased from

    20 cents per $1,000 to the present

    rate. Over the past 30 years, pre-

    miums, rates have uctuated only

    2.5 cents per $1,000 of insurance.

    The group insurance industry nor-

    mally adjusts premium rates when

    there are changes in the economy

    and/or changes in the number of

    death claims. VA uses actuaries to

    conduct program experience stud-

    ies. For a service member with the

    maximum $400,000 of life insur-

    ance, this change means an in-

    crease of $2 a month. Individual

    Ready Reserve members who are

    drilling for points toward retire-

    ment or who do not receive pay for

    other reasons will be billed by their

    branch of service for the higher

    premium.

    The Retiree Activities Office

    is open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Mon-

    day through Friday. Visit the of-

    ce in Building 1604 at Califor-

    nia and Colorado Avenues or call

    301 981-2726. Call before your

    visit to ensure a volunteer is on

    duty. The RAO website is at www

    .andrews.af.mil.

    Retiree Corner

    BY CAPT. DAVID LIAPIS

    92ND AIR REFUELING WING

    PUBLIC AFFAIRS

    A couple of feet and a half a sec-

    ond. These may seem like insigni-

    cant measurements; but when com-

    bined with fatigue, a couple of feet

    almost cost me my career, and that

    half a second almost ended my life.

    There was a time when I was

    an enlisted aircraft electrical and

    environmental systems specialist

    and was part of the 19th Aircraft

    Maintenance Unit, at Joint Base

    Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. In

    the summer of 2008, while I was

    assigned to work in the support

    section, my supervisor and I were

    tasked to move much of the equip-

    ment from the 19th AMU hangar

    to the 12th AMU hangar because of

    renovation.

    We had a tight deadline and the

    NCO I was working for was deter-

    mined to complete the task dur-

    ing our shift that night, even if it

    meant working more than 12 hours.

    That night wore on and turned

    into morning and I knew it would

    not be long before the recently set

    sun would peak up again over the

    Chugach Mountains.

    Things were going well for the

    rst few hours. I remember gawk-

    ing at Elmendorf's very rst F-22

    Raptor that had arrived only days

    prior as I hauled load after load of

    pallets and equipment across the

    hangar oor. I felt privileged to

    be able to get up close to this jet

    named after a Jurassic Park an-

    tagonist that all manner of mili-

    tary and civilian men and women

    of rank and position had been ock-

    ing to the base to see in the preced-

    ing days.

    Then, unexpectedly, I got a clos-

    er look than I ever hoped for.

    I wasn't sure how I deviated so

    far off my well-established path

    down the centerline of the hangar.

    However, I was sure I saw the half-

    ton of palletized equipment I was

    backing into the hangar pass less

    than a yard from the nose tip of the

    $150 million pride of the base.

    I didn't say a word to anyone

    about it at the time. All I could do

    was imagine what my fate would

    have been if I had destroyed the

    pointy end of that beautiful ghter

    jet. The thought made me sick to

    my stomach. My line number for

    staff sergeant-gone. My future in

    the Air Force-shot.

    Can you imagine being "that

    Airman" who smashed up Elmen-

    dorf's rst F-22?

    If I had still managed to pro-

    mote and apply for ofcer training

    school, I can picture the conver-

    sation at the ofcer accessioning

    board going something like this:

    "and next up is a sergeant David

    Liapis ... wait, I know that name

    from somewhere. Oh, yeah, he's the

    guy that cost the Air Force millions

    of dollars because he was an idiot

    -- next applicant."

    As you might have guessed, fa-

    tigue was the main contributing

    factor in the previously related in-

    cident; however, I was not the only

    one suffering from too much work

    and too little rest that night.

    My supervisor was stacking

    some pallets with a forklift as I

    guided him forward. I'm not sure

    how I ended up between a moving

    pallet and a wall, but I did. I gave

    the hand signal for the sergeant to

    stop, but he didn't. I managed to

    squeeze out of that tight spot just

    in time to avoid having the pallet

    pin me against the wall at my mid-

    section. He was too tired and didn't

    react quickly enough to my signal-

    again it was fatigue.

    The Air Force Safety Program

    is nothing new. All the right rules

    and guidelines existed that night

    as they had for years prior and

    have for years since. We just got so

    wrapped up in what we were do-

    ing that we failed to consider and

    put into practice what we had been

    taught and what common sense

    told us.

    We knew better, but the mission

    needed to be accomplished-or did

    it? Did it really all have to be done

    that night?

    It's true, getting the job done is

    what we are all about; however, we

    need to make appropriate risk as-

    sessments and ensure we'll be here

    to take on the next mission. Our

    line of work has inherent risks, but

    most can be easily mitigated.

    The goal, rather the quest, is for

    zero-zero fatalities, zero mishaps,

    zero dollars spent to repair or re-

    place needlessly damaged resourc-

    es. That night, failure to appropri-

    ately address fatigue almost cost

    me a whole lot ... times two.

    Commentary

    I really shouldn't be here

  • Andrews Gazette

    Friday, February 6, 2015

    3

    BY BOBBY JONES

    STAFF PHOTOJOURNALIST

    The Maryland Na-

    tional Capital Parks and

    Planning Commission,

    Department of Parks and

    Recreation (DPR) kicked

    off Black History Month

    with an Art Exhibit Open-

    ing, highlighting a cen-

    tury of African American

    culture and history in

    Prince Georges County

    at the Montpelier Cultur-

    al Arts Center in Laurel

    Feb. 1.

    The program entitled

    Glancing Back and Look-

    ing Forward, illustrates

    the lives of everyday and

    prominent Prince Geor-

    gians whose contributions

    helped mold the countys

    rich legacy, through edu-

    cation, businesses com-

    munities and the Civil

    Rights movement through

    the use of video, photos,

    art and events.

    Ronnie Gathers, Mary-

    land National Park and

    Planning Commission

    DPR director, gave the

    opening remarks to a

    capacity room of coun-

    ty residents, including,

    Maryland Sen. Douglas

    Peters, District 23; Cur-

    rent Mayor of Greenbelt;

    Emmett V. Jordan and

    former Mayor of Green-

    belt, Judith Davis.

    Rosalyn Johnson, dep-

    uty director, Department

    Parks and Recreation

    opened the event by laud-

    ing the historical accom-

    plishments of the coun-

    ty. We are here to tell

    our story about the 319

    years of Prince Georges

    County, said Johnson,

    referring to some recent

    unfavorable press stories

    about the county. We are

    going to tell our story our

    way, and were going to

    continue to write our sto-

    ry as it happens

    Johnson noted, The

    exhibit showcases a re-

    markable story of our

    county and how it grew

    from a mere suburb of

    Washington, D.C., our na-

    tions capital, to this won-

    derful, vibrant commu-

    nity that has triumphed

    over many challenges.

    Expounding more of

    the countys history, John-

    son explained how Prince

    Georges County, in its

    infancy was also a pre-

    dominantly black county

    which sold enslaved Af-

    ricans from Upper Marl-

    boro and Bladensburg

    for money, silver and to-

    bacco, the countys and

    Marylands chief product

    then. But later when

    the slaves were freed and

    became farmers, entre-

    preneurs, and business

    professionals -- owning

    businesses, such as the

    Bladensburg Carrying

    Association, Smith Bar-

    bershop, the first com-

    munity barbershop in

    Glenarden. Our county

    also became the home of

    27 Rosenwald Schools,

    established in 1917 for

    African American chil-

    dren in the rural South

    by Julius Rosenwald, an

    American businessman

    and philanthropist, which

    is how a number African

    Americans in our county

    received their education.

    After taking the au-

    dience on brief educa-

    tion of Prince Georges

    Countys history, Johnson

    introduced the key note

    speaker, Rock Newman,

    former Brandywine na-

    tive, former Maryland

    Parks and Planning Com-

    mission employee, sports

    promoter and award win-

    ning radio talk host.

    He addressed the

    crowd humbly as a proud

    Prince Georgian, chroni-

    cling his upbringing in

    the county as a youth, his

    college years at Howard

    University, his well-tele-

    vised career as the boxing

    manager of World Heavy

    Weight Champion Rid-

    dick Bowe and his radio

    talk show.

    Newman thanked the

    Parks and Recreation di-

    vision for inviting him to

    speak and commended

    their efforts for a job well

    done on the Black History

    Month exhibit opening re-

    ception. I gave kudos to

    Mr. Ronnie Gathers, DPR

    director in private for

    such a spectacular event.

    But, I now saying publicly

    who ever put this all to-

    gether deserves a raise,

    said Newman, with an

    icebreaker statement.

    In reference to your

    theme, Glancing Back

    and Looking Forward,

    I think I can never go

    wrong acknowledging

    Almighty God rst, said

    Newman, relating to his

    childhood experiences,

    educational opportunity

    and his introduction in

    the sports and entertain-

    ment arena.

    Part of what gave

    me the foundation for

    who and what I am to-

    day was when I went to

    a segregated school. We

    had ragged books, and

    chipped-up and beat-up

    desks. But we had some-

    thing that you could not

    pay for or buy; love, ex-

    claimed Newman, then

    8-years-old. I had love

    for all of my teachers,

    including Miss Mitchell,

    who I had a crush on,

    Newman joked.

    Newman also shared

    his rst experience of rac-

    ism as a youngster while

    he out riding his new bike

    one day. He witnessed a

    man cutting his grass

    with a riding lawnmower.

    That was my rst time

    ever seeing riding mow-

    er. Looking curiously

    at the mower he noticed

    the mufe had a curious

    white crust on it which

    reminded him of the ice

    that would build up inside

    his mothers freezer. So

    he asked the man if the

    white coating was hot or

    cold. He said its cold, grab

    it. He put the bike down

    and grabbed it. And as

    I tell you this story I still

    feel the pain that seared

    through my hand and my

    mind. Next the man said,

    Nigger dont you ever

    come in my yard again.

    As an innocent 8-year-old,

    I couldnt fathom how an

    adult could do something

    like that to a child.

    Later in Newmans

    life-accounts realized the

    dening moment in his

    life when he predicted

    that then Cassius Clay

    would be the next Heavy

    Weight champion of the

    world. All of his family,

    friends and boxing pun-

    dits laughed, because of

    Clays inexperience. On

    Feb 25, 1964 Clay won

    the title, and that became

    the part of my DNA and

    the dening moment in

    my life. Ive believed if I

    could conceive it, and I

    pursued what I wanted

    with a sense of purpose,

    I could accomplish any-

    thing, and so can you,

    said Newman, encourag-

    ing the audience.

    Later, when New-

    man transcended into

    the world of sports as a

    promoter, he reected on

    when he sat in a room

    with the head of HBO

    Sports and Time Warner,

    multibillion dollar corpo-

    rations. I felt in my heart,

    we were being treated

    unfairly, said Newman,

    a boxing promoter in 90s.

    The head of HBO told

    me that he saw me as a

    dove and warned me that

    if I didnt sign the con-

    tract by the next morning,

    that he along with his 26

    lawyers would come down

    on me like a hawk. I real-

    ized that I was viewed as

    the ultimate outsider, who

    didnt play the game and

    stood my ground with my

    one little scrawny lawyer.

    I answered him and well

    you dont have to wait un-

    til tomorrow to turn into

    a hawk. But I want you

    to remember something.

    Im a sparrow. Everyone

    in the room didnt under-

    stand comment at that

    time. But after a few

    months, we not only got

    the money we were asking

    for, but a whole lot more,

    said Newman. So after-

    wards, I had lunch with

    that same threatening

    HBO head and he asked

    me what I meant by being

    a sparrow. I asked him if

    had heard of the old Ne-

    gro spiritual, His eye is

    on the sparrow, making

    him realize that is God

    that watches over me, a

    higher power in me lives.

    Newman went on to

    talk briey about his ex-

    periences as a counselor;

    Howard University Base-

    ball Hall of Famer; meet-

    ing with Nelson Mandela

    and Pope John Paul II;

    along with numerous oth-

    er dignitaries and politi-

    cal leaders.

    At the conclusion of

    the program, announced

    the unveiling of a Black

    History Month Poster

    project produced by a

    group of students from

    Northwestern High

    School. The art piece

    took two months to pro-

    duce will be displayed in

    the art gallery section of

    the Montpelier Cultural

    Arts Center as an educa-

    tion piece. We were able

    to take advantage of a

    teachable moment, said

    Rosalyn Johnson, deputy

    director, DPR, referring to

    the poster.

    Cl inton resident ,

    Frankee Smith noted she

    was glad to expose her

    granddaughter to learn

    more about the history of

    Prince Georges County.

    My granddaughter en-

    joyed the key speaker,

    Rock Newman and talked

    with him at the end of

    the program. She really

    keyed in on the part when

    he said that you can be

    anything that you want

    to, just believe, Smith.

    He asked her what she

    wanted to be and she said

    a dinosaur. He smiled and

    encouraged her nonethe-

    less. I told him because

    of her love for dinosaurs,

    I suspect she could actu-

    ally end up being a pale-

    ontologist.

    MNCPPC celebrate county's century old history

    Rock Newman, former

    Brandywine native, former

    Maryland Parks and Plan-

    ning Commission employ-

    ee, sports promoter and

    awardwinning radio talk

    host addresses his home

    audience as the key note

    speaker during Art Exhibit

    opening.

    PHOTOS/BOBBY JONES

    Clinton resident, Frankee Smith, listens to her granddaughter, Christian Smith 4,

    ask she asks a question about a photo of young girl reading a book in 1920s.

    1041904

  • Andrews Gazette

    4

    Friday, February 6, 2015

    from six to nine years of

    age; FIRST Lego League

    for students nine to 14

    years old; the FIRST Tech

    Challenge for high school

    students; and the FIRST

    Robotics Competition for

    high school students.

    Denise Lewis, US

    FIRST Regional Director,

    Washington, D.C., noted

    The real purpose of this

    event is to expose our

    children to opportunities

    where everyone can be a

    winner and be successful.

    Theres a job out there for

    every student interested

    in college math, science,

    technology or engineer-

    ing, said the former edu-

    cator.

    We put far too much

    emphasis on sports, like

    basketball or football.

    These kids could be any-

    where else, but they are

    here learning about sci-

    ence, real-world issues

    and how to improve learn-

    ing, said Lewis. Its

    much more than just ro-

    bots here. They also have

    to do a research paper

    during the event, because

    its part of the competi-

    tion.

    Ive volunteered with

    FIRST well over 8 years

    and Ive seen the benets

    of this program, because

    my son started out here

    with FIRST and a young-

    ster and now hes turned

    down several scholar-

    ships, and decided to join

    the Navy on full scholar-

    ship to academy as an

    officer. He wants to be

    an electrical engineer be-

    cause he was inspired by

    this program when his

    was really young, said

    Lewis proudly.

    According to Lewis

    theres a $20,000 grant

    called the FIRST Lego In-

    novation Award thats of-

    fered to the most innova-

    tive team and has offered

    to help them le a patent

    for their invention. This

    is an international com-

    petition for all countries

    around the world.

    The teams are awarded

    in the categories of project

    presentation, robot, me-

    chanical design, perfor-

    mance, and core values --

    which recognizes a team

    that is able to accomplish

    more together than in-

    dividually, incorporat-

    ing shared goals, strong

    communication effective

    problem solving and time

    management. There is al-

    so the champions award

    that embraces the FLL

    core values, while achiev-

    ing excellence and innova-

    tion in the robot game and

    project.

    Alberto Lacaze, Call

    Us Boss Lego League

    coach is one of several

    volunteers who loaned his

    experience and time to

    helping the children build

    a multiplexor robot for the

    event. We started work-

    ing on it during the April

    time-frame, said Lacaze,

    a robotics engineer with

    a firm in Gaithersburg.

    The kids were really wor-

    ried about doing multiple

    missions at the same time.

    But they saw on YouTube

    that someone had built a

    multiplexor and they tried

    it, but it turned out to be

    gigantic. So after rebuild-

    ing it a couple of times

    they were able to reduce

    its size and they named it

    Pedro. So far theyre not

    doing so well, said Laca-

    ze. However, they have

    two more trials so well

    see what happens.

    Jose Gabriel Salazar

    and his wife, Isa, watched

    anxiously from the side-

    line shooting video of their

    son, Gabriel, 12, along-

    side team member, Albert

    James, nervously execute

    missions for their robot.

    Army Sgt. 1st Class Er-

    ic Atkins, an Army Corps

    of Engineers electrical en-

    gineer at theWhite House,

    served as scorer during

    the event, periodically

    glancing over at his son,

    Jonathan, 13, competing

    with for the rst time with

    the Lego Pros, 4-H Club of

    Clinton. His mom, Julie

    Atkins shot video and of-

    fered cheers of encourage-

    ment. She noted My hus-

    band has volunteered to

    attend FIRST Lego meet-

    ings, and competitions for

    the past 4 years. Hes a

    Lego guy too. He grew

    up with it as a child from

    very young age too. Last

    year, my son supported

    the team. This year is

    his rst time competing,

    Atkins. He wants to be a

    Lego designer; in fact, he

    wants to be the one who

    designs the kits, She

    added. Hes very Math,

    Science and Engineering

    minded.He is my husband

    through and through. He

    loves it and Science is his

    favorite subject.

    FIRSTs began in 1992

    with 28 teams in a New

    Hampshire high-school

    gym. Today the pro-

    gram is reaching close to

    250,000 young people. To

    learn more about the pro-

    gram, visit http://www.

    mdrst.org.

    LEGO, from page 1

    PHOTO/BOBBY JONES

    Call Us Boss teammembers, Gabriel Salazar, 12,

    left, and Albert James prepare to execute missions

    for their multiplexor robot, named Pedro.

    for student loan inter-

    est payments, dividend

    and brokerage state-

    ments and any other

    tax documentations.

    If the member pre-

    fers to complete their

    taxes in person, servic-

    es are located in build-

    ing 1683 for a discount-

    ed price.

    Savells also stated

    that Ft. Belvoir, Vir-

    ginia and Quantico,

    Virginia offer military

    members and depen-

    dents in-person tax

    preparation services.

    The JBA Legal Of-

    ce is slated to hold a

    Retiree Day on Feb. 12

    for retirees and their

    dependents to receive

    legal advice and make

    tax-related inquiries.

    An appointment will be

    required for these ser-

    vices.

    For more infor-

    mation or questions,

    contact the Legal Of-

    fice at 240-612-5750

    or on Facebook at

    fa cebook . c om/Jo in t

    BaseAndrewsLegalOf-

    ce.

    TAX, from page 1

    1050424

    Ourisman Chrysler/Jeep/Dodge Ram of Alexandria

    5900 Richmond Highway

    Alexandria, VA 22303

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    Please ask for the Internet Department

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    $750 OFF for active duty or retired military plus 1 year free maintenance

    1050500

  • Andrews Gazette

    Friday, February 6, 2015

    5

    Arnold, Roses Department

    Store lead associate noted,

    We have fun by being kind

    to customers. I love show-

    ing customers what to buy,

    how to accessorize, what

    outfits coordinate and

    what colors work together,

    said Arnold. Often in re-

    tail its what you can do to

    make customers want to

    come back. For me, its fun

    to meet new people who

    give us inspiration and we

    in turn try to inspire them.

    So I always give them eye

    contact, smile and remem-

    ber their name.

    Her coworker, Jacque-

    line Fassassi, Roses De-

    partment Store proces-

    sor, noted that discussing

    issues at work that they

    cant talk with anyone else

    lightens her day. I also

    like to dance a little while I

    work, because it makes my

    day go by easier.

    At Party City, where

    fun is the centerpiece of

    the party supply rental

    company, Tom Brill, Party

    City Store District Heights

    manager, was unaware of

    the unofcial holiday, but

    whole-heartedly promotes

    fun in the work place. I

    wasnt aware today was

    Have fun at Work Day,

    but I encourage the em-

    ployees to have a good time

    while theyre working,

    said Brill. They share

    some of their home-life sto-

    ries with each other and

    tell funny stories and jokes

    to create a fun atmosphere.

    We believe in getting the

    job done, but theres al-

    ways room to have fun. On

    special occasions we have

    pizza parties to lift their

    spirits and reward them

    for their extra effort during

    inventory time, said Brill.

    I feel like the more we

    can be a part of each oth-

    ers lives outside of work

    and know whats going on

    with each other the more

    fun well have, Brill added

    Jerome Manning, Party

    City assistant manager,

    noted We have cleaning

    competitions all the time

    for fun. In fact, we had a

    really good time last night,

    clowning around while we

    were cleaning and doing

    inventory.

    Finally, inside one of

    the last places one might

    expect to nd any sort of

    levity was found to be just

    the opposite at the dental

    ofce of Dr. Cox and Dr.

    Greenstein in Clinton.

    Raimey Rite, dental

    technician of 15 years,

    shared the special relation-

    ship she has with her fel-

    low coworkers and the pri-

    mary dentist she assists.

    I like to talk to the pa-

    tients and see whats been

    going on in their day and

    try to make light of it, be-

    cause some people come

    into the dental ofce al-

    ready stressed. So I have

    to distract them by talking

    with them so by the time

    the Dr. Greenstein comes

    in theyre already calm.

    However, it all depends on

    the patients attitude, espe-

    cially during a root canal ...

    So, while Im observing the

    procedure, I physically sit

    in a chair higher than him

    and I make fun of his grey

    hair and the patients love

    it, said Rite. The doc-

    tor usually has a snappy

    comeback. We do a lot of

    role play, depending on

    how nervous the patient

    might be.

    Rite also mentioned a

    recent time when surgi-

    cal gloves were ordered

    and the only colors avail-

    able were pink and green.

    We gave Dr. Greenstein

    a pair of pink gloves. He

    was reluctant at rst, how-

    ever, when challenged, he

    meets it head on. But now,

    its become a running joke

    here because everyone else

    wears pink gloves and we

    explained to him that only

    a true man wouldnt have

    a problem wearing them,

    said Rite. He didnt like it

    at rst but now he plays

    along.

    Rite explained, Were

    stuck with each other

    for 10-hours a day and

    deal with a lot of stress-

    ful patients who come in

    stressed and sometimes

    traumatized from events

    in their lives.We have to be

    able to calm them down, so

    were kind of like chair-side

    psychiatrists, said Rite.

    So we have fun and let the

    patients see us have fun,

    which calms them down.

    Its all a part of making the

    patient comfortable.

    Rite reected on a prank

    played on Dr. Greenstein

    by the entire staff. We had

    this one patient who was a

    police ofcer who agreed to

    come in wearing her uni-

    form and play a joke on

    Dr. Greenstein. Although

    he hadnt come into work

    yet Greenstein was in for a

    surprise. When he arrived,

    the ofcer approached him

    with a rolled up piece of

    paper in her hand, telling

    him that he was being sub-

    poenaed for court with the

    staff looking on laughing

    at his reaction. We like to

    play pranks on each other.

    So it appears that even

    in the most unlikely work

    environments, Prince

    Georgians thrive on hav-

    ing a fun day at work to

    promote an environment

    of trust for their customers

    and camaraderie amongst

    their coworkers.

    WORK, from page 1

    PHOTO/BOBBY JONES

    Jerome Manning, Party City assistant manager in Capital Heights, says he

    rewards employees with pizza parties.

    1008907

    1050245

  • Andrews Gazette

    6

    Friday, February 6, 2015

    BY LESLIE C. SMITH

    STAFF WRITER

    A journey of melodic

    melding will take over

    the Publick Playhouse

    on Saturday as Karen

    Lovejoy and The Lovejoy

    Music Group and Phil

    Wiggins and the Chesa-

    peake Sheiks bring their

    dynamic, jubilant and

    effortless sounds to the

    venue.

    Jazz vocalist Karen

    Lovejoy fronts the well-

    versed and first-class

    Lovejoy Music Group -

    comprised of Herb Smith

    on saxophone and wood-

    winds; drummer, Law-

    rence Bubbles Dean, pia-

    nist and musical director,

    and Bob Shann, bassist

    which will bring their

    versatile approach to jazz

    to the stage with a funky

    mix of blues and jazz.

    Harmonica virtuoso

    Phil Wiggins brings his

    cast of Piedmont blues to

    the stage. Having played

    for more than 30 years as

    part of the duo Cephas

    and Wiggins, he was

    spurred to go into differ-

    ent directions seeking to

    follow in the vein of the

    black string and swing

    bands of the 20s and

    30s like Martin, Bogin

    and Armstrong, and the

    Mississippi Sheiks. All

    these people were at first

    categorized as Piedmont

    players or Delta players

    then people started call-

    ing them songsters be-

    cause they played a lot of

    different styles of songs,

    Wiggins explained.

    This jazz blues show

    is far from anything you

    would expect; dont come

    ready to cry your way

    through this show. With

    these two powerhouses

    its about energy and get-

    ting the crowd to have a

    good time.

    The root of blues

    -- as it relates to jazz

    -- is that its to kind of

    have fun and to make

    it soulful and energetic.

    People think of blues as

    something that you are

    drowning in a bottle and

    crying tears. Blues to me

    has always been a joyful

    music -- joyful in that its

    a release for the spirit.

    Sometimes its a way of

    even laughing at your-

    self. It speaks to some

    situations -- some situ-

    ations one might prefer

    not to be in maybe -- and

    it does so in a comical

    way; in way that allows

    you a release. So to me

    the music is about uplift-

    ing; its about healing; its

    about fun.

    Wiggins added, There

    are some people into this

    music that are obsessed

    with trying to recreate

    something from the past,

    like I say in the music

    notes, were not trying

    to create the old 78s we

    just love this music and

    we play it in the present;

    were not trying to imi-

    tate people from the past.

    We love this music in the

    present and we play it in

    the present -- play it the

    way we feel it. We see

    it for celebration -- for

    dancing and celebrating.

    And thats the energy we

    try to put out when we

    perform.

    Blues has always

    been very much a part

    of Wiggins life. Wiggins

    discovered his love for

    and became grounded in

    blues spending time in

    his familys hometown of

    Titusville, Ala., where he

    spent many summers.

    I believe I fell in love

    with the sounds of the

    blues from my grand-

    mothers church; outside

    the church on Wednesday

    nights because I would

    walk my grandmother

    to church and I would

    wait outside the church

    for her to finish. I would

    listen to the prayer meet-

    ing -- the prayer meeting

    was the elder women of

    the church that would

    do these congregational

    prayers. One woman

    would sing out a phrase

    and the congregation

    would answer back and

    that to me was almost

    like a pure blues sound

    even though the lyr-

    ics were not blues and

    the words were prayers

    and praise but the feel

    of it was a deep blues, a

    deep emotional [sound]. I

    think, really, that is how

    it got into my blood.

    With these two artists

    performing at this venue

    it is sure to be a treat for

    the ears and the spirit.

    And both of these art-

    ists are doing their part

    to ensure that these

    American born and bred

    art forms remain a part

    of the American experi-

    ence.

    Lovejoy imparted,

    There is undoubtedly

    an audience for jazz -- a

    young audience for jazz

    -- but the question is,

    how do you get to them?

    Because whatever music

    industry that is left, the

    last thing they want to

    deal with is jazz The

    Internet offers potential.

    There is an avenue that

    needs to be explored; its

    a communication entity

    and it holds the potential;

    to reach what has not

    been reachable before. I

    just think we just have to

    become very savvy public

    relations folks and use

    the tools that are avail-

    able today to be able to

    put the music out there

    It really is about expo-

    sure. When I perform in

    public venues and there

    are young people in the

    vicinity -- whether its 14

    or 25 -- they will come up

    and ask questions. They

    are really interested in

    the music; its just get-

    ting to that group.

    Wiggins often teaches

    and takes any opportu-

    nity to share through

    performing to continue to

    infuse this music to the

    next generation and ex-

    pose to new audiences. I

    talk to a lot of young peo-

    ple about the Piedmont

    The Publick Playhouse offers musical ight of jazz, blues fusion

    seeMUSIC, page 7

    If you go ...

    Find out more

    about Karen Love-

    joy and the Love-

    joy Group at www.

    lovejoygroup.com or

    reach them at lovejoy-

    group@yahoo.com to

    be added to the mail-

    ing list.

    Find out more

    about Phil Wiggins

    and the Chesapeake

    Sheiks, biography

    and future events, on

    www.philwiggins.com.

    The performance is

    on Saturday 8 p.m. at

    the Publick Playhouse

    in Riverdale, Md., call

    301-277-1710.

    1050522

  • Andrews Gazette

    Friday, February 6, 2015

    7

    and the swing tunes;

    and I have taught peo-

    ple that will hopefully

    carry it on.

    I dont worry about

    it dying out; it has

    what people need.

    Blues music, especially,

    was born and created

    in a time when life was

    really hard for people

    and people needed

    something to sustain

    their spirit and that is

    why blues was created;

    and I think it still has

    that power in it. Nowa-

    days, people still need

    it now; were living in

    this high-tech world

    where people spend so

    much time looking at a

    screen they need some-

    thing real and I think

    that what this music

    can provide. So I think

    well always need it;

    and as long as people

    are doing it -- and do-

    ing it well -- t will live

    on.

    Whether a casual

    fan or an aficionado,

    both artists have some-

    thing for you to enjoy.

    BY SENIOR AIRMAN

    NESHA HUMES

    11TH WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

    The U.S. Air Force pre-

    mier rock band, Max Im-

    pact, performed for Super

    Bowl XLIX fans at West-

    gate Entertainment Dis-

    trict in Glendale, Arizona,

    on Feb. 1.

    Thousands of foot-

    ball fans listened to the

    30-minute concert as

    they passed through the

    restaurants and stores of

    Westgate. The dining and

    entertainment district is

    less than a half-mile from

    The University of Phoe-

    nix Stadium, where Super

    Bowl XLIX was held.

    They played a single

    show, ranging from clas-

    sic rock to country, at the

    district, just hours before

    the kick-off of Super Bowl

    XLIX.

    This is probably a

    highlight of my career,

    playing for 10,000 to

    15,000 people on Super

    Bowl Sunday, Tech. Sgt.

    Robert K. Smith, Max Im-

    pact percussionist, said.

    The performance went

    absolutely amazing.

    The band transitioned

    into their nal song by

    asking everyone to take a

    moment to be serious and

    remember the events of

    September 11, 2001.

    We all remember

    where we were and what

    we were doing when we

    heard about the attack

    on twin towers, Senior

    Master Sgt. Ryan Car-

    son, Max Impact vocalist,

    said. But today, instead, I

    want to focus on the days

    after the attack, when

    all the stores were sold

    out of American ags, we

    want to take you back to

    those days and the sense

    of pride the nation felt.

    The band concluded

    their performance with

    God Bless the U.S.A., a

    song by Lee Greenwood.

    They made me feel

    like a real patriot, said

    Railton Anderson, an at-

    tendee, who laughed as

    he tugged at his New

    England jersey.

    The six-member band

    provided similar patri-

    otic closers for their four

    shows at Fan Fest in

    Scottsdale in January.

    The weeklong entertain-

    ment, fashion and food

    event was home to the

    Entertainment Sports

    and Programming Net-

    works live broadcast for

    the Super Bowl.

    I think the tour was

    great, Sgt. Jonathan

    McPherson, Max Impact

    pianist, said. We had

    the opportunity to play

    for Super Bowl fans and

    reach a national audi-

    ence by being featured on

    ESPN.

    The band seeks to use

    the power of music to

    inspire audiences world-

    wide, create innovative

    products and programs

    while representing Air

    Force excellence.

    We brought the Air

    Force message not only

    to the people of Glendale,

    but also the nation and

    the world, McPherson

    said.

    Max Impact performs for fans at Super Bowl

    U.S. AIR FORCE PHOTO/ SENIOR AIRMAN NESHA HUMES

    SeattleSeahawk fanscheer forMax Impacts performanceatWestgateEntertainment

    District inGlendale, Az., Feb. 1.Max Impact is theU.S. Air Forces premier rockband.

    MUSIC, from page 6

    1050257

  • Andrews Gazette

    8

    Friday, February 6, 2015

    1050496