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64-foot Out Islander Long Range Expedition Cruiser Operating Manual (April 2022)
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64’ Out Islander

Apr 18, 2022

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Page 1: 64’ Out Islander

64-foot Out Islander

Long Range Expedition Cruiser

Operating Manual

(April 2022)

Page 2: 64’ Out Islander
Page 3: 64’ Out Islander

LA VIDA OPERATION MANUAL NW Explorations | i

Table of Contents

1.0 Welcome Aboard ................................................................................................................. 1

1.1 History .............................................................................................................................. 1

1.2 Disclaimer ......................................................................................................................... 2

1.3 Important Vessel Numbers .............................................................................................. 3

2.0 General Description ............................................................................................................. 4

2.1 Design ............................................................................................................................... 4

2.2 Layout ............................................................................................................................... 5

2.3 Foredeck ........................................................................................................................... 6

2.4 Aft Deck ............................................................................................................................ 6

2.5 Fly Bridge and Boat Deck .................................................................................................. 6

2.6 Salon ................................................................................................................................. 6

2.7 Pilothouse ......................................................................................................................... 7

2.8 Galley ................................................................................................................................ 7

2.9 Master Stateroom ............................................................................................................ 8

2.10 VIP Stateroom .................................................................................................................. 9

2.11 Guest Cabin ...................................................................................................................... 9

2.12 Generator Room ............................................................................................................... 9

2.13 Engine Room .................................................................................................................... 9

2.14 Amidships Mechanical Compartment ............................................................................ 10

3.0 Safety Equipment Locations .............................................................................................. 11

3.1 Anchors ........................................................................................................................... 11

3.2 Bilge Pumps .................................................................................................................... 11

3.3 High Water Alarm ........................................................................................................... 11

3.4 Dingy Dry Bag ................................................................................................................. 12

3.5 Emergency Exit ............................................................................................................... 12

3.6 EPIRB .............................................................................................................................. 12

3.7 Fire Extinguishers ........................................................................................................... 12

3.8 First Aid Kit ..................................................................................................................... 12

3.9 Flares .............................................................................................................................. 12

3.10 Horn ................................................................................................................................ 12

3.11 Navigation Lights ............................................................................................................ 12

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3.12 Life Preservers / PFD ...................................................................................................... 12

3.13 Life Ring .......................................................................................................................... 12

3.14 MARPOL Trash Placard ................................................................................................... 13

3.15 Pollution Placard ............................................................................................................ 13

3.16 Smoke / Carbon Monoxide Alarms ................................................................................ 13

3.17 Spotlight ......................................................................................................................... 13

3.18 VHF Radios ...................................................................................................................... 13

3.19 Windshield Washer / Wiper ........................................................................................... 13

4.0 Domestic Systems .............................................................................................................. 14

4.1 Lighting ........................................................................................................................... 14

4.2 Fresh Water System ....................................................................................................... 14

4.2.1 Sump Pumps ........................................................................................................... 15

4.2.2 Watermaker ............................................................................................................ 15

4.3 Head Systems ................................................................................................................. 15

4.3.1 Holding Tank Monitor ............................................................................................. 16

4.4 Air Conditioning .............................................................................................................. 16

4.5 Galley and Appliances .................................................................................................... 17

4.5.1 Cooktop ................................................................................................................... 17

4.5.2 Oven ........................................................................................................................ 17

4.5.3 Barbeque ................................................................................................................. 17

4.5.4 Washer & Dryer ...................................................................................................... 17

4.5.5 Refrigerators ........................................................................................................... 17

4.6 A/V Entertainment System ............................................................................................ 17

4.6.1 Salon TV................................................................................................................... 17

4.6.2 Salon Audio ............................................................................................................. 18

4.6.3 Bluray ...................................................................................................................... 18

4.6.4 Bluetooth Streaming ............................................................................................... 18

4.6.5 Whole Yacht Audio ................................................................................................. 18

4.6.6 Flybridge Stereo ...................................................................................................... 19

5.0 Electrical Systems ............................................................................................................... 19

5.1 110-volt and 220-volt AC Panel ...................................................................................... 19

5.1.1 Generators .............................................................................................................. 20

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5.1.2 Shorepower ............................................................................................................. 20

5.1.3 Inverter ................................................................................................................... 20

5.1.4 Batteries .................................................................................................................. 21

5.1.5 Charging the Batteries ............................................................................................ 21

6.0 Engines ............................................................................................................................... 22

6.1 Daily Engine Checks ........................................................................................................ 22

6.1.1 Check the Sea Strainers .......................................................................................... 23

6.1.2 Check the Coolant Level .......................................................................................... 24

6.1.3 Oil drips ................................................................................................................... 24

6.1.4 Fuel Filters ............................................................................................................... 24

6.1.5 Engine Oil ................................................................................................................ 25

6.1.6 Visually Inspect the Engine Room ........................................................................... 25

6.1.7 Check the Transmission Oil Level ............................................................................ 25

6.2 Engine Controls .............................................................................................................. 26

6.2.1 Station Transfer....................................................................................................... 26

6.2.2 Synchronizing Engine RPM...................................................................................... 26

6.2.3 Engine Start-Up ....................................................................................................... 27

6.2.4 Shaft Seals ............................................................................................................... 27

6.2.5 Main Engine Operating Parameters ....................................................................... 27

6.3 Fuel System .................................................................................................................... 28

6.3.1 Fuel Management ................................................................................................... 28

6.3.2 Checking the Fuel Level........................................................................................... 28

6.3.3 Filling the Fuel Tanks ............................................................................................... 29

7.0 Electronic Aids to Navigation ............................................................................................. 30

7.1 VHF radio ........................................................................................................................ 30

7.2 Autopilot and rudder indicator ...................................................................................... 30

7.3 Chartplotter and Radar .................................................................................................. 31

7.4 Sounder .......................................................................................................................... 32

7.5 Automated Identification System .................................................................................. 32

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8.0 Maneuvering ...................................................................................................................... 32

8.1 Docking & Undocking ..................................................................................................... 32

8.2 Maneuvering in a Harbor ............................................................................................... 33

9.0 Anchoring ........................................................................................................................... 33

9.1 Setting the Anchor ......................................................................................................... 34

9.2 Retrieving the Anchor .................................................................................................... 35

9.3 Shore Tie or Stern Tie ..................................................................................................... 35

9.4 Rafting ............................................................................................................................ 36

9.5 Anchor and Ground Tackle ............................................................................................. 37

9.5.1 Primary Anchor ....................................................................................................... 37

9.5.2 Secondary Anchor ................................................................................................... 37

9.5.3 Anchor Chain Markings ........................................................................................... 37

9.5.4 Anchor Windlass ..................................................................................................... 38

9.5.5 Lowering the Anchor ............................................................................................... 38

9.5.6 Raising the Anchor .................................................................................................. 38

9.5.7 Chain Locker ............................................................................................................ 38

9.5.8 Anchor Bridle .......................................................................................................... 38

9.5.9 Anchor Rode Jams ................................................................................................... 38

9.5.10 Saltwater Washdown Pump ................................................................................... 39

10.0 Bilge Pumps ........................................................................................................................ 39

11.0 Bow and Stern Thrusters ................................................................................................... 40

12.0 Roll Stabilizers .................................................................................................................... 40

12.1.1 Caution .................................................................................................................... 40

12.1.2 Start-up Procedure.................................................................................................. 40

13.0 Tender, Davit, and Outboard Motor .................................................................................. 41

14.0 Troubleshooting ................................................................................................................. 42

14.1 Engine overheating ........................................................................................................ 42

14.2 Fuel filter ........................................................................................................................ 42

14.3 Outboard motor ............................................................................................................. 42

14.4 Low battery .................................................................................................................... 43

14.5 Anchor ............................................................................................................................ 43

14.5.1 Anchor chain is stuck in anchor locker ................................................................... 43

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LA VIDA OPERATION MANUAL NW Explorations | v

14.5.2 Anchor is stuck on the bottom ............................................................................... 43

14.5.3 Anchor windlass will not turn ................................................................................. 43

14.6 Toilet will not flush ......................................................................................................... 44

14.7 Freshwater does not flow at faucet ............................................................................... 44

14.8 Hitting a log .................................................................................................................... 44

14.9 Hitting a rock or submerged object ............................................................................... 45

14.10 Running into a fishing net .............................................................................................. 45

15.0 Operating Checklists .......................................................................................................... 46

15.1 Engine Room Checks ...................................................................................................... 46

15.2 Starting Engines .............................................................................................................. 46

15.3 After the Engines Have Started ...................................................................................... 46

15.4 Stopping the Engines ...................................................................................................... 47

15.5 Starting the Generator(s) ............................................................................................... 47

15.6 Switch from Shore Power ............................................................................................... 47

15.7 Stopping the Generator(s) ............................................................................................. 47

15.8 Switch from Generator to Inverter ................................................................................ 47

15.9 Preparing to Leave the Dock .......................................................................................... 48

15.10 Immediately After Leaving the Dock .............................................................................. 48

15.11 Normal Cruising .............................................................................................................. 48

15.12 Approaching Dock .......................................................................................................... 48

15.13 Arriving at Dock .............................................................................................................. 48

15.14 Connecting to Shore Power ........................................................................................... 48

15.15 Anchoring ....................................................................................................................... 49

15.16 Pulling up Anchor ........................................................................................................... 50

16.0 Emergency Procedures ...................................................................................................... 51

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LA VIDA OPERATION MANUAL NW Explorations | 1

1.0 Welcome Aboard

La Vida is an Out Islander 64 – a custom designed “do it all” long range expedition yacht. The

concept is “form follows function”, where function is living aboard, exploring, anchoring out,

fishing and diving. It is a yacht designed for the owner-operator, easily handled, rugged outside,

and complemented with luxury inside. She has a comfortable ride, is fuel efficient at

displacement speeds, and has a max speed of 19 knots to outrun weather, or reach a destination

fast when needed.

Her spacious layout includes a large salon for hosting, a king-sized bed in the master suite, a walk-

around queen in the VIP, a roomy galley with plenty of storage, a separate dinette, wide

companionways, and a large aft deck and fly bridge. For entertaining, she is equipped with a

wine cooler, freezer, a 5.1 surround entertainment system, and a whole yacht audio system.

There are five different operating stations with bow and stern thrusters to ensure easy docking

in any situation. Fully equipped with 6 Air Conditioning units, 2 generators, washer & dryer, and

an 800 gallon per day water maker makes La Vida a truly versatile expedition yacht, appointed

with everything you need to comfortably enjoy your cruise.

1.1 History

The Out Islander began with Greg Sturgis. Greg was the East coast Offshore Yachts distributor

for 14 years, the largest dealer for Rampage for 5 years, and a dealer for Islander and Tartan

sailboats in the early 1980s. His experience in building, outfitting, and delivering yachts led to his

interest in building the ideal yacht for his cruising lifestyle.

The late Tom Fexas is a nationally known yacht designer in Stuart, Florida. He first won acclaim

in 1978 with his “Midnight Lace” design, and had since went on to design many production and

custom yachts for Cheoy Lee, Palmer Johnson, Grand Banks, Mikelson, and more. Sturgis

contacted him about his idea of a swiss-army knife, do it all, rugged, but with a luxury interior,

yacht. After several years, the project got underway in 2005.

Greg’s history with Offshore Yachts led to his decision to have the yacht be built by Carmague

Yacht Co. in Taiwan. Carmague has built over 100 Offshore Yachts, where they are known for

their excellent workmanship and use of top of the line components. The result is a quality

expedition yacht that looks like a cross between a Nordhavn and an Offshore.

The Out Islander 64 is the last yacht design by Fexas before he passed in 2006, and it was unveiled

at the Miami Boat Show in 2009. It is an unmistakable Tom Fexas Design – a semi-displacement

hull that allows for long range capability or speed when needed. It exemplifies his deft touch of

designing yachts that do their intended job really well.

Unfortunately, this is the only Out Islander 64 built, as the 2009 recession hit the yachting

industry hard and the company never got off the ground. For more information, there are several

articles featuring the Out Islander 64 in the La Vida information folder.

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1.2 Disclaimer

This operating manual is an introduction to the motor yacht La Vida, and her features such as

the safety, electrical, domestic, propulsion and control systems. This manual will help you

operate this vessel with confidence however, this manual is not intended to replace a basic

understanding of seamanship. It is the responsibility of the charter guest to have knowledge of

the ‘Rules of the Road,’ and basic skills of navigation, boat handling, and interpretation of

weather conditions. This knowledge can be gained through powerboat training classes offered

by NW Explorations.

Motor yachts are propelled and control with complicated equipment. This manual is intended

to provide a ‘working’ explanations of how these systems operate. For an in-depth explanation

of how a particular system operates, you are encouraged to study the manuals that can be

found onboard, or on the internet. For example, to fully understand the use of electronic

navigation systems, we recommend reviewing instructional videos that can be viewed at the

manufacturer’s website or, on YouTube.

NW Explorations assumes no responsibility for any errors or omissions of this operating manual

and represents only that the writings and illustrations herein represent our “best efforts” to

provide a comprehensive overview of the vessel, so that it can be operated by a person who

has the necessary experience and/or training to operate such a vessel given the additional

information herein.

You should be aware that this operating manual is provided as a convenience to the owners,

crew members, and guests on this vessel, and is not complete in every detail. Given the

complexity of this boat and its systems, it is not possible that all conditions, contingencies, and

operating details can be included, both because of space limitations and because of ordinary

oversight as contingencies are speculated upon by NW Explorations. Likewise, it is possible

either through oversight and/or changes in the vessel because of additions, modifications, or

deletions to or of equipment since publication of this manual, that items discussed will operate

differently than described, be absent from the vessel, or be added to the vessel without

discussion in this volume.

As a vessel owner, crew member or charter guest on this vessel, you are here at your own risk,

and it is your responsibility to be trained and prepared to operate the vessel. If you do not feel

competent to undertake any or all operations detailed in this operating manual, contact NW

Explorations for addition training.

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1.3 Important Vessel Numbers

Vessel Name La Vida Capacities

Official Number 1258081 Sleeps 6

Hull ID OIY64021A009 Fuel 1860 Gallons

MMSI Number 368147160 Starboard 450 Gallons

Radio Call Sign WDL6077 Center 462 Gallons

Port 453 Gallons

Dimensions Lazarette 495 Gallons

Length Waterline 58’ 1” Fresh Water 400 Gallons

Length Hull 64’ Holding Tank 150 Gallons

Length Overall 68’ 8” Hot Water 20 Gallons

Beam 19’ 5” Fluids

Draft 5’ 3” Main Engine Fuel Diesel

Air Draft Main Engine Oil Chevron Delo 15W-40

Displacement 108,000 lbs. Transmission Oil Shell Rotella 30W

Gross Tonnage 107 Engine Coolant CAT DEAC 50/50 mix

Net Tonnage 86 Generator Fuel Diesel

Generator Oil Chevron Delo 15W-40

Generator Coolant CAT DEAC 50/50 mix

Engine Operating Parameters

RPM Fuel Burn (g/h) Speed (knots) Efficiency

(nm/g)

1,000 11.51 8.4 0.7

1,200 15.51 9.8 0.6

1,400 25.01 11.2 0.4

1,600 35.81 12.2 0.3

1,800 36.82

2,000 49.62

1. Measured values

2. Caterpillar engine specifical data sheet

NW Exploration Service Shop: 360-393-5309

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2.0 General Description

2.1 Design

The Out Islander 64 is a semi-displacement pilothouse expedition yacht. Its hull design allows for

a smooth and seaworthy ride. It is fuel efficient at displacement speeds, yet can reach a max

speed of 19 knots. She is solidly built to handle passage-making, with solid laminate below the

water line, and core-cell infused house and deck to provide light weight and strength. She has a

long shallow keel infused with 3500lb of lead shot provides exceptional stability and pleasant

motion at sea. The keel also extends past the props and rudders to provide protection for the

running gear.

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2.2 Layout

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2.3 Foredeck

The foredeck can be accessed through a door from the Portuguese bridge. Up forward, at the

anchor platform are a saltwater spigot to port, and freshwater spigot to starboard. The large

anchor platform holds the two anchors, both of which are controlled by foot switches for the

windlasses. The black water pump out is on the port side against the Portuguese bridge.

The storage lockers in the bridge contain the fenders, lines, buckets, hoses, cleaning supplies,

anchor bridle, etc. Basically you can find all the wet gear stored here.

2.4 Aft Deck

The aft deck has two deck hatches in the cockpit. The starboard hatch holds the Village Marine

water maker, and the port hatch holds the Cable Master system. Both have lots of room for

storage. The lazarette bilge and steering rams are accessible through the hatches. The BBQ is

on the port side of the cockpit and the cockpit freezer is on the starboard side. The steps up to

the lanai deck lifts for access to the generator and engine room. The lanai deck has an aft facing

setee to port, with life jackets in the bench hatch. The aft helm control station is on the starboard

side. Both sides have ice makers, capable of producing all the ice needed for your fresh catch.

2.5 Fly Bridge and Boat Deck

The large fly bridge is situated well aft, which reduces pitching and keeps it dry in rough seas.

This together with the great visibility around the boat makes this a great helm station. It is also

a great hang out place, with a L-lounge, split table, sun-lounge, drink fridge, and stereo. The wing

control stations are positioned on the outside of the bridge coaming, giving the skipper view of

the full length of the vessel, making these the ideal docking stations. The storage lockers contain

the davit control, hose, and dinghy repair supplies. The L-lounge bench contain additional life

jackets. To aft of the fly bridge is the boat deck, which holds the 14’ Novurania tender, life raft,

and life ring.

2.6 Salon

The large sliding door from the lanai deck opens to the spacious salon, with large windows for sit

down visibility to the views outside. It is outfitted for entertaining complete with a large flat

screen TV, 5.1 surround sound, large wine cooler, and seating for 8.

On your right, on the panel below the window, are the light switches, deck speaker volume

controls, and A/C. The top grey switch is for the deck blue/white Cantalupi lights – flick down

once to turn on, and flick it twice quickly to switch colors. The bottom white knob turns on the

rope lighting for a cozier atmosphere. The media cabinet on the right contains the entertainment

system (bluray, receiver, and amplifier) for the TV and whole boat audio. The toggle switch on

the left of the cabinet raises and lowers the TV from the cabinet. Hold the switch up to raise the

TV until it is fully raised. Please be sure to clear off any and all items from the wooden countertop

so as to not block the hinge mechanism.

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LA VIDA OPERATION MANUAL NW Explorations | 7

The far left top drawer contains remotes, batteries, and pens. The drawer below contains

stemware and beverages. The little drawer between the staircases contains keys, deck fill keys,

and flash lights. The storage ottoman bench contains board games for those long crossings, and

the seats flip over as serving trays. The electric hi-low main table can be raised and lowered by

a rocker switch behind the sofa, and can open up to make more room for dining.

2.7 Pilothouse

The raised pilothouse provides excellent views

from the helm except aft and has controls over all

the ships systems. The reverse raked pilothouse

windows shed water quickly in adverse weather

and doesn’t reflect the instrument lights, making

for better night vision if needed. The overhead

instrument panel contains convenient monitors

for tank levels, battery levels, bilge pumps, water

maker, and inverter. The main helm dash has two

Furuno NavNet 3D units, VHF, Autopilot, and

engine monitors. Below the helm are the 24-volt DC Panel to port and 120-volt AC panel to

starboard. The generator controls are to the right of the AC panel.

There are two 9K BTU Air Conditioning units for the pilot house. The upper panel controls the

vents against the windows, and the lower A/C panel controls the vent at the steering wheel. This

allows you to set the upper A/C unit to defrost the windows separately from the pilot house

climate. For operation procedures review Section 4.4.

The pilothouse has two heavy duty Airtex doors on either side of the bridge station. These are

super heavy so please take care when you open, close, and secure them. Two skylight hatches

above the bridge can open for ventilation, with built in shade and insect screens. For

entertainment under way, the helm has its own speakers, volume control, and subwoofer.

2.8 Galley

The galley is aft of the bridge and is outfitted to

thoroughly satisfy the home chef and the rest of

the party. The appliances include a Miele electric

range, GE electric stove, full size side by side GE

refrigerator, GE trash compactor, GE microwave,

and Insinkerator garbage disposal. There is a

Keurig K-Supreme Plus coffee maker that can use

both K-cups and ground coffee for the caffeine

addicts. And finally, there is a Cuisinart

multifunction blender, food processor, and juice

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extractor under the dinette for making blended drinks or healthy juice. For the gourmet chef, the

galley is equipped with various pots and pans, J. Henkels knife set, garlic press, galley tools, etc.

Opposite the galley is a dinette that converts to a

pilot companion berth, making a good place to

sleep during passage-making. The USB port at the

dinette is a high speed port that will charge your

phone or laptop very quickly. The large drawer

under the raised dinette sole holds paper charts.

2.9 Master Stateroom

One really nice feature of La Vida is the private stairs from the salon down to the full-beam master

stateroom, giving a sense of separate space for the guests on board. The cabinet to the right of

the staircase contains the first aid kit and miscellaneous toiletry needs.

The master stateroom has a large king sized walkaround berth, and tremendous amount of

storage drawers around. On the right is a large vanity desk, and a large hanging closet. The other

closet is to the left of the base of the stairs. The floor board in this closet opens up to the battery

compartment and master bilge. The master head is aft to port, with marble countertop and a

large shower.

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2.10 VIP Stateroom

VIP stateroom is forward with a queen sized berth, two

hanging closets, and storage throughout. It has a

private access to the shared second head. At the foot

of the bed under the carpet is the access to the forward

bilge and bow thruster. The cupboards at the head of

the bed can be opened by pushing on them to provide

access to a hatch that opens to the chain locker. When

bringing in the anchor chain, it frequently castles (piles

up and falls over) in the locker and requires that the

chain be pulled down in order to bring in the entire length. When hauling the anchor, use a boat

hook or similar device to flake the chain back and forth to build a neat pile (See section 9.5.9).

2.11 Guest Cabin

The port guest cabin has two raised single berths. This

raised design allows hanging lockers and the washer and

dryer to be tucked underneath. In the hanging locker are

paper charts and all manuals for the boat.

2.12 Generator Room

The steps to the lanai deck lift up for access to the generator room. Be very careful lowering this

heavy hatch. There is very little finger holds, and if not careful, you will smash your fingers. To

port is a Northern Lights 16kW and to starboard is a 20kW generator. Generators mounted in

whisper sound shield on EAR Anti-vibration mounts, making them exceptionally quiet to run even

at night time. They are barely noticeable from the staterooms and provide more than enough

power for all the systems running on the boat. Two Delta-T 12V blowers on both air vents ensure

this room is well ventilated. Fire suppression is automatic with a Fireboy MA-550FE-241.

A complete set of tools are in the DeWalt and Craftsman toolboxes in case something needs

repairs. Also stored in this room are fluids and parts. Motor Oil, Gear Oil, Hydraulic Fluid, are

secured on the floor against the generators. Diesel additive Stanadyne is stored against the

starboard side hull. On the shelves behind the generators are fuel rags and generator spare parts.

2.13 Engine Room

Access to the engine room is through a watertight door from the generator room. Between the

engine room and the master stateroom are the fuel tanks, which really shields the cabins from

mechanical noises from the engine room and generator rooms. In the engine room are the two

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massive Caterpillar C-15 engines with dual racor fuel filters mounted directly in front. The motor

oil dipstick are both accessed from the center walkway. Spare fuel filters and motor oil are stored

in the generator room.

On the port side hull, there are 3 A/C units (master cabin, galley, and salon), the saltwater pump,

and hot water heater. On the starboard side hull, there are also 3 A/C units (pilot house 1 and 2,

and guest cabin), and both freshwater pumps.

Against the forward bulkhead are the fuel manifolds, fuel sight gauges, fuel cross-over valves,

coolant tanks, and hydraulic steering and engine control reservoirs. When the fuel cross-over

valves are open (normal operating position) All three forward fuel tanks can be filled from one

deck fitting and the center sight-guage is accurate for all three tanks. Besure that both the top

and bottom valves are open during fueling and then closed when fueling is complete. You may

also open the sight-guages for the two other tanks as well to monitor the fuel levels in all three

tanks. Normal operating position of the fuel sight-guages is to have the top and bottom valves

closed when underway.

Fire suppression is automatic with a Fireboy MA-1050 mounted in the maine engine room and

another mountied in the generator engine room. Two Delta-T 24V blowers provide fresh air into

the engine room.

2.14 Amidships Mechanical Compartment

The amidships mechanical compartment is accessed through a floor hatch under the carpet at

the base of the guest quarters stairs. There are two overhead lights with switches. In this

compartment are the two furuno NavNet units, main DC thermal breakers, guest head sump, and

waste discharge pump. Also in this compartment are all the spare parts in the plastic bins. There

are spare electrical parts, plumbing parts, and repair supplies. There are fuses, breakers, bilge

pumps, sea strainer baskets, o-rings, hydraulic seal kits, water pump and A/C pump repair kits,

headhunter valves, wires, wiper parts, hinges, knobs, latches, etc. If you need to repair

something, you might find the part here.

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3.0 Safety Equipment Locations

3.1 Anchors

The primary anchor is an Ultra UA-80 176 lb. anchor mounted on the port side of the bowsprit

with 400 feet of chain.

The secondary anchor is a Delta 110 lb. anchor mounted on the starboard side of the bowsprit

also with 400 feet of chain.

Both anchor chains are marked with yellow and red paint designating the following lengths:

20 feet from anchor Yellow – Red - Yellow

50 feet Yellow

100 feet Red

150 feet Yellow

200 feet Red

250 feet Yellow

300 feet Red

350 feet Yellow

20 feet from bitter end of chain Red – Yellow - Red

400 feet Red

3.2 Bilge Pumps

There are seven Rule 2000/24V 2000GPH bilge pumps with Super Switches, one at each bilge

location.

There are three Rule RM-800/24V 800GPH automatic bilge pumps, located in the Master Cabin,

Fwd Engine Room, and Generator Room bilges.

There is a high output Whale WF-123 Manual Bilge Pump at the Fwd Engine Room Bilge.

Bilge Locations:

1. VIP Cabin – Access through floor hatch at base of VIP berth

2. Guest Head – Access through floor hatch at base of forward stairs

3. Master Cabin - Access through floor hatch in master closet

4. Fwd Engine Room - Access through forward floor hatch in engine room

5. Aft Engine Room - Access through aft floor hatch in engine room

6. Generator Room - Access through forward floor hatch in generator room

7. Lazarette - Access through either cockpit hatch

3.3 High Water Alarm

There is a high water alarm at each bilge location.

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3.4 Dingy Dry Bag

A dingy dry bag is under the helm seat of the inflatable dingy. This bag contains, 1st aid kit

flashlight, air horn, heaving line and a spare plug for the dingy.

3.5 Emergency Exit

The emergency exit from the Master Cabin is overhead on the port side of the berth. Pull down

on the ceiling straps to access the emergency exit.

3.6 EPIRB

The EPIRB is in the document’s cabinet at the left side of the helm.

3.7 Fire Extinguishers

o Engine Room – Fireboy MA 1050

o Generator Room – Fireboy MA-550FE-241 these fire suppression systems are not

powered when boat is off.

o Handheld fire extinguishers are located in each stateroom and in various cabinets. Please

take time to locate all fire extinguishers.

3.8 First Aid Kit

The first aid kit is in the cabinet at the right of the staircase down to the Master Cabin.

3.9 Flares

The flares are in the cabinet at the base of the pilothouse starboard exit door below the dinette.

3.10 Horn

The ship’s air horn is powered up by turning on a breaker on the 24 V panel. The horn is

activated when pressing the chrome push-button at the center of the pilothouse dashboard.

3.11 Navigation Lights

After turning on the Nav. and Anchor Lights breaker, the Navigation lights and anchor light is

operated from the pilothouse dash board.

3.12 Life Preservers / PFD

Inflatable PFDs are hanging in closets in each stateroom. Vest-type III Life preservers are in the

lanai deck bench cabinet and in the flybridge seating area on the port side.

3.13 Life Ring

The life Ring is mounted on the flybridge starboard stern cabinet.

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3.14 MARPOL Trash Placard

This placard is located on the port side of the trash compactor

3.15 Pollution Placard

3.16 Smoke / Carbon Monoxide Alarms

o Combined smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are located:

o Overhead at the entrance to the master stateroom

o Behind the door of the VIP stateroom

o On the bulkhead of the guest cabin

3.17 Spotlight

An ACR spotlight control is located on the pilothouse dashboard. The circuit breaker on the 24 V

panel must be turned on

3.18 VHF Radios

Located at both the pilothouse and flybridge dash board. A hand-held VHF radio is located to

the port side of the pilothouse dash board.

3.19 Windshield Washer / Wiper

Located on the port side of the flybridge dash board.

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4.0 Domestic Systems

• Lighting

• Fresh water systems

• Sump pumps

• Watermaker

• Head and marine toilets

• Air Conditioning

• Galley appliances

• Entertainment

• Whole Yacht Audio

• Flybridge Stereo

This section describes operations of systems used to make life onboard more comfortable.

4.1 Lighting

Around the deck are Imtra bi-color deck lights that can be switched between white a blue. The

switch is located by the salon door and flipping the switch quickly on to off and on will toggle the

color.

There are small round safety lights around the yacht with switches are all labeled “safety”. These

lights are located along the floor and illuminate walking areas.

4.2 Fresh Water System

The 400 gallon fresh water tank is located below the master cabin.

The Tank Tender monitor is located on the very left of the

overhead instrument panel. To check the tank level, rotate the

tank selector dial to “5”. Whole holding down the lower left

button (2), pull out the knob (3) and quickly push it back in a couple

of times. The inner ring will measure the number of inches left in

the water tank. A full water tank will read 27 inches.

The fill is located amidships on the port side. The dock side water connection is located on the

port side stern. The water fill key is in the key drawer to the right of the staircase from the salon

up to the galley.

The primary pump is a Headhunter 110V Mach 5. The 24V pump is a Headhunter X-Caliber. Both

are located on the starboard side of the engine. The Mach 5 will provide a slightly higher pressure

and flow rate. Use the 110V Mach 5 when connected to shore power or running then generator

and use the 24V X-Caliber when using the inverter will reduce load on the inverter.

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Hot water is supplied by an Allcraft 110V 20 gallon hot water tank located on the shelf against

the hull side of the port engine. Turn on the hot water tank by switching the circuit breaker on

the 110V panel to on.

4.2.1 Sump Pumps

The master head shower and sink, and the guest head shower and sink drain into a sump. This

grey-water is pumped overboat with a sump pump. The sump pump breaker switch on the 12-

volt DC panel must be turned on to use those systems.

4.2.2 Watermaker

The water maker is a Village Marine Reverse Osmosis

(RO) system, located in the starboard cockpit hatch.

It can produce up to 800 gallons of fresh water per

day.

To operate:

1. Turn on the ‘Water Maker’ breaker on the

220V AC panel

2. Turn on the LP pump

3. Turn on the HP Pump.

When the Freshwater tank is full water will flow out of the tank vent on the side of the boat.

Turn off the system by:

4. Turn off the HP pump

5. Turn off the LP pump

6. Flush the system with freshwater by pressing the FLUSH button

4.3 Head Systems

The heads are equipped with top of the line Headhunter Royal Flush marine toilets that use very

little water per flush and does not have moving parts. These use a high pressure jet of fresh

water to flush the toilet. The “head” circuit breaker and one of the fresh water pumps must be

on for the heads to flush. The flush switch is located on the left side of the head when facing the

unit.

Important: The only stuff that goes into the toilet is whatever you have already eaten, and

some toilet paper. Do not put baby wipes, paper towels, or feminine products into the toilet,

they will clog the toilet.

In case of a clogged toilet, get the plunger stored in the port side bridge bench hatch (forward

of the pilot house). DO NOT use a plunger as you normally would, instead put the plunger into

the bowl, and hold it down firmly against the bowl to create a seal around the plunger. Push the

switch to flush the head while holding down the plunger. The high-pressure jet of water will

force the clog through to the holding tank.

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4.3.1 Holding Tank Monitor

The Tank Sentry holding tank monitor is located on the left

side of the overhead instrument panel. Turn on the unit to

monitor the holding tank level. It will take 30 seconds for

the unit to complete the initialization process. The unit will

alarm if the holding tank is at 90%.

The holding tank discharge pump is a Headhunter Mako1

pump located in the Amidships Compartment. To pump out

the holding tank, turn the pump switch on the Tank Sentry

monitor to AUTO. It will pump out the holding tank until it

is at 10%. To pump the last 10%, hold the switch in the

MANUAL position until it is empty.

4.4 Air Conditioning

La Vida is equipped with ‘Marine Air’ air conditioning

(A/C) and heating system with a total of 108,000 BTU of

cooling and reverse cycle heating with the 6 independent

AC units on board. System outlets are located

throughout the boat controlled by thermostats in each

stateroom, pilothouse, and salon. Circuit breaker

switches are in the AC Breaker Panel. To operate the A/C

ion, you must have either shore power connected or a

generator running, with both the “A/C Pump” and at

least one “A/C Zone” circuit breakers turned on as required. Be

careful if using a shore power connection not to overload it. The

air conditioners’ “Mode” setting allows them to heat or cool the

vessel, and the thermostats will cycle them on as needed. The air

conditioning control panel has symbols; the red dot/white dot

button turns the area on or off. The button with the fan blade symbol regulates fan speed. The

red and green thermometers control the temperature. Your settings are shown in the readout,

and the LED’s show the system’s status.

1-Power, 2-Manual fan speed, 3, 6, & 8-LED indicator, 4 and 5-Temperature control, 7-Temperature set point.

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4.5 Galley and Appliances

The galley is equipped with coffee maker, microwave, food processor, blender, juicer and other

home-kitchen appliances.

4.5.1 Cooktop

The cooktop is a Miele electric glass top range which works when plugged into shore power or

running on one of the generators.

4.5.2 Oven

The GE electric oven is also powered with shore power or generator.

4.5.3 Barbeque

The BBQ is a ElectriChef 220V 24” Marine Grill. Turn on the timer, set the temperature,

preheat. This is also powered with shore power or generator.

4.5.4 Washer & Dryer

The washer is a Whirlpool LHW0050PQ4 front load washer. It is located under the forward berth

in the guest cabin. The dryer is a Whirlpool WED7500VW front load dryer. It is located under the

aft berth in the guest cabin.

4.5.5 Refrigerators

La Vida has three refrigerators, a wine cooler, freezer, and ice maker. These appliances operate

with AC power provided by shore power or generator.

o The galley fridge is a GE PS123MGWA BV side by side refrigerator/freezer,

o The wine cooler in the salon is a Marvel 6SWCE-BD-LL,

o The pilothouse fridge is an Isotherm 1006502 located on the forward side of the galley

bar,

o Fly bridge refrigerator is located on the starboard side of the flybridge area,

o An ice maker on port side of the lanai deck, and

o A built-in freezer is located on the starboard side of the lanai deck.

4.6 A/V Entertainment System

La Vida is outfitted with a state of the art music and movie entertainment system. There is a 4K

TV with a bluray player with a speaker system in the salon, and a whole yacht audio system with

speakers in the pilothouse, fly bridge, cockpit, master stateroom, and guest stateroom.

Everything is controlled from the A/V cabinet in the salon and powered from the ‘TV Stereo’

breaker switch on the 120V AC panel.

4.6.1 Salon TV

The Salon TV is an LG 4K TV in the starboard side cabinet. It can be raised and lowered via the

three position toggle switch. Clear items off the top of the TV cabinet. Push up on the switch until

the TV comes to a stop and return the switch to the middle position. To lower the TV, push down

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on the switch until the TV lowers to a full stop and return the switch to the middle position. HDMI

Input 1 will display the source selected by the Marantz NR-1609 Receiver.

4.6.2 Salon Audio

The salon in ceiling speakers are the MAIN Zone speakers powered by the Marantz NR-1609

Receiver. To turn on the audio in the salon, turn on the Marantz Receiver and select the MAIN

Zone source using the left rotary knob. The video from the source selected will be output to the

TV HDMI 1. The subwoofer is under the bench next to the wine fridge and plugged into the same

circuit as the wine fridge. If you are not getting any base from the subwoofer, make sure the

‘Salon Wine Cooler’ breaker switch is turned at the 120V AC panel is turned ON.

4.6.3 Bluray

The bluray player is a Denon DN-500BD. To play a Bluray or DVD, turn on the TV and set the TV

source to HDMI Input 1. Turn on the Marantz Receiver and set the source to ‘Bluray’ using the

left rotary knob. Turn on and insert a bluray disc into the Denon bluray player.

4.6.4 Bluetooth Streaming

You can also connect and stream music and audio to the Marantz Receiver via Bluetooth. To pair

your Bluetooth device, use the Marantz remote and hold down the ‘Bluetooth’ button (about 3-

5 seconds) until the front of the receiver displays ‘Paring…’ Then on your Bluetooth device, select

the Marantz receiver to pair. Once paired, the Bluetooth device should be selected as the source.

If not, use the left rotary knob to select your device as the source or select ‘HEOS MUSIC’.

4.6.5 Whole Yacht Audio

The Marantz receiver also controls the audio source to the whole yacht audio system. The Salon

speakers are the MAIN Zone and are powered by the Marantz receiver, and the rest of the

speakers are in ZONE2 and powered by the Niles Amplifier. To get sound on all other speakers,

turn on the Niles amplifier by pressing the power button in the middle of the unit. To select the

source, turn on Zone 2 by pressing ‘ZONE2 ON/OFF’ button on the receiver. Then to select the

source, press the ‘ZONE2 SOURCE’ button until the desired source is selected. If you wish to play

from your Bluetooth device, select ‘HEOS MUSIC’. You can also play AM/FM radio stations by

selecting ‘TUNER’.

The speakers in the Master Cabin, VIP Cabin, Pilothouse, Flybridge, and Aft Deck all have their

own volume controls. They are white rotary knobs in each room. The Aft Deck volume control

is inside the salon to the right of the A/V system. Even though each of the rooms have their own

volume control, the Marantz ZONE2 volume control adjusts the baseline volume. Please ensure

that the Marantz ZONE2 volume is set to max if you’re not getting enough volume in the room

speakers.

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4.6.6 Flybridge Stereo

The flybridge speakers are powered by their own amplifier. To turn on the flybridge speakers,

turn the ‘FB Stereo’ breaker switch on the 12-volt DC Panel to ON. The source still comes from

the ZONE2 source from the Marantz Receiver.

5.0 Electrical Systems

5.1 110-volt and 220-volt AC Panel

The AC panel lets you configure the source of power for

each of the four quadrants of systems in the panel. There

is the 110 System 1 on top left and System 2 on top right,

and 220 System 1 on bottom left and System 2 on bottom

right. Each has a rotary dial that lets you select the source

from Shore 1, Shore 2, Gen 1 and Gen 2. The 110 System

1 has an additional inverter source. Typically, if you are

connected to shore power or running one generator, all

sources will be set to the same power source. If not, set

the 110 System 1 to Inverter.

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5.1.1 Generators

There are two generators on La Vida in the generator

room. To port is a Northern Lights 16kW. To starboard

is a Northern Lights 20kW. Both are well sound insulated

and are very quiet to not be noticeable from the cabins.

For most cruising needs, you should only need to run one

generator or just the inverter. If you are running a heavy

load, you will want to start the second generator if the

total load is > 70% of the generator. You can estimate

the load in kW with the following formula:

kW load=(110V Amps + 2x the 220V Amps) / 10

For example: If the 110V system is using 50 Amps, and

the 220V system is using 25 Amps, you are using ( 50 + (2

x 25) ) /10 = 10kW, which is fine on either generator.

5.1.2 Shorepower

The aft shorepower connectors are two Glendinning Cable Masters to port of the cockpit steps.

The forward shorepower connectors are on the starboard side of the bridge. The shorepower

panel lets you set shorepower System 1 and System 2 to be the forward or aft connectors

depending on which one is in use. The Cablemaster breaker should be on and the switch to deploy

and retrieve the shore cable is in the side, port cabinet in the aft cockpit.

5.1.3 Inverter

The inverter is a Victron Multiplus 24/3000/70 3kw Inverter / 70Amp Charger located behind the

stairs down to the guest cabins. The control panel, is a touch screen on the right end of pilot

house overhead instrument panel.

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The panel shows the current flow between

shorepower/generator, the inverter, batteries,

and loads. It also shows the house battery state of

charge. Please do not run the house battery below

50% DoD (Depth of Discharge) which will shorten

battery lifespan. The inverter can power the 110

panel System 1. Please do not have over 25 Amps

of devices on at the same time if power to the 110

System 1 is supplied by the inverter.

5.1.4 Batteries

There are five battery banks, monitored by two

battery monitors on the pilot house overhead

instrument panel.

The house battery is a 24V 660AH bank

consisting of 12x Crown 6CRV220 AGM

batteries located under the master cabin

closet hatch. The left battery monitor display

with the switch in the center position shows

the voltage of the house battery.

Each of the two main engines have a 24V

battery bank for starting the engines, These

banks consisting of 2 Northstar AGM 8D 12V

batteries located on the hull side of each

engine. The right battery monitor (above,

right) displays the state of charge of these batteries. The switch in the left position monitors the

port engine start battery bank, the right position monitors the starboard engine start battery

bank, and nothing in the center position.

The two generators each have a single Northstar AGM 8D 12V battery located on the hull side

shelf of each generator. The left battery monitor display also monitors the generator batteries.

The switch in the left position monitors port generator battery and the right position monitors

the starboard generator battery.

5.1.5 Charging the Batteries

The engine battery charger is a ChargeMaster Plus 24/40-3 CZone in the generator room. It

charges the 24V engine start batteries and the 12V generator batteries. The breaker switch is on

the AC panel 110 System 2 labeled ‘Engine Charger’. Leave this on to keep the engine and

generator start batteries charged. There is a charging relay above the starboard generator, which

Generator starting battery banks monitor is on the left and the main engines starting battery banks monitor is on the right..

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allows the charger or, either generator to charge both generator batteries. Leave the switch for

the relay on.

The Victron inverter is also a charger and it charges the house batteries. The switch is on the AC

panel 110 System 2 labeled ‘Inverter Charger’. Leave this on to keep the house batteries charged.

The secondary battery charger is a second Victron inverter. The switch is on the AC panel 110

System 2 labeled ‘Battery Charger’. Turn this on if needed to increase the house battery charging

speed.

The house battery is also charged when the starboard engine is running. A 24V 140Amp

alternator supplies power to the ships systems and charges the house battery.

6.0 Engines

La Vida is powered with two Caterpillar C15 ACERT 15.2 liter twin turbo diesel engines rated at

853 HP each at 2300 RPM. Peak torque is 2421 ft-lb at 1600 RPM.

Do not run the engines for long periods of time with no load and transmissions in neutral. These

engines require a regular daily check. Please perform this check each morning (see engine

checklist).

Normal engine coolant operating temperature will be 180°F. If the coolant temperature rises

above 210°F, reduce engine load. The engine temperature should drop quickly, if not, stop the

engine and determine cause before resuming operation; check the sea strainer for debris.

Normal engine oil pressure is between 40 psi and 80 psi at normal operating RPM of 1200 to

1600.

6.1 Daily Engine Checks

Before getting underway, we advise that you enter the engine room look around at all the

equipment. The engine room is entered through the hatch in the cockpit; the stairway hatch

opens there are steps down into the generator room, and then enter the engine room through

a door. Light switches for generator room are to the right above the starboard generator.

Likewise, the light switches for the enginer room or to the starboard of the door and near the

overhead. The main objective of the engine room check is to monitor the general condition of

onboard equipment. While you are in the engine room, look around and ask yourself, “does

everything look right?” To help with this, complete follow the checklist:

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Engine room Checklist

Seawater strainers Main engines and generator sea strainers clear of excessive debris

Coolant level Between the Cold and Hot level; main engines

Oil drips Check the oil absorption pads under main engines for significant

oil leaks

Fuel filters Fuel is clear amber without significant sediment and water is

absent

Engine oil Between the low and high marks

6.1.1 Check the Sea Strainers

The engine strainers are in the forward end of each engine. To check a strainer, shine a flashlight

through it. While some fuzziness from trapped marine growth is normal, you should see the light

clearly on the other side. If moderately obscured, you should

clean the strainer.

To Clean the seawater strainer:

1. Close the thru hull valve by turning the handle perpendicular to valve,

2. Open the top of the strainer by hand, they should be hand-tight.

3. Pull out the basket and dump the debris into the garbage. Replace basket into strainer,

4. Screw the top back into position and tighten to snub, do not overtighten,

5. Open the valve at the bottom of the seawater strainer.

6. Start up the engine and check for water flow through the exhaust port at the transom.

7. Check for leaks at the seawater strainer. 8. Monitor engine temperature

Seawater strainers are forward of each main engine.

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6.1.2 Check the Coolant Level

The coolant expansion tanks are located on the forward

bulkhead in front of each engine. If coolant is needed,

determine if there are any signs of a coolant leak under the

engine. Coolant should be needed rarely, If it is, find out

why. If there is, do not run the engine. If there is no leak, add

coolant to the tank from the pre-mixed coolant supplied on

the boat.

Do not open the cap on the coolant reservoir unless the

engines are cold. If the coolant is hot it will be forcibly

ejected from the cap potentially scalding you with hot liquid.

6.1.3 Oil drips

Under each main engine is an oil pan that is lined with oil absorption pads. Visually check these

for significant oil drips. There will be small drips here and there, monitor these. If an oil drip

becomes significant such as a 2 or 3-inch diameter spot, try to locate the source and then call

the service shop.

6.1.4 Fuel Filters

The primary fuel filters are inboard of each engine along the center walkway. These filters

collect sediment and separate any water that may be in the fuel. Place a flashlight to the side of

the bowl at the bottom of the fuel filter housing and you should see clean amber diesel fuel

with a little sediment. The diesel fuel may have a red die added to it so, variation of color is OK.

If you see a clear colorless fluid, it is water - Call the Service shop right away. If there seems to

be excessive sediment and the amber diesel fuel is cloudy, keep this in mind, you may need to

switch to the backup fuel filter if the engines are not pulling enough fuel.

Coolant expansion tank is mounted on the bulkhead forward of each engine.

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These Racor brand fuel filters are set up in pairs; one

of the filters is active with fuel flowing through the

filter to the engine. The second filter is the backup

filter and ready to be used when the first filter is

clogged. Between the two filter units is a valve with a

handle that has a point at one end. This points toward

the filter being used. If the RPM of one of the engines

begins decrease, you will need to switch to the backup

fuel filter.

To switch fuel filters:

1. Slow the engines down to idle and shift the engines out of gear,

2. Have a crewmember take watch as you enter the engine room,

3. Turn the valve handle at the front of the Racor filter so that it points toward the backup filter.

4. Check the fuel filter of the other engine, if there is excessive sediment, switch that filter as well.

5. Let the engine idle for a minute before increasing the throttle to cruising speed

Between the two filters is a vacuum gage that indicates the pressure (vacuum) of fuel being

pulled through the filter. If the needle is in the red zone, it is time to switch to the backup fuel

filter.

6.1.5 Engine Oil

The oil level should be between the two marks on the dipstick. The dipsticks are located in the

middle of the engines along the center walkway. Use a paper towel from the roll in the generator

room, wipe the stick, reinsert and back out to take the reading.

Add only enough oil to bring it up to the ‘add’ mark, using the Chevron Delco oil provided in the

generator room. If you need more oil, please buy it, and we will reimburse you.

6.1.6 Visually Inspect the Engine Room

Whenever you’re in the engine room, ask “Does everything look right?” Look at the pads under

the engines and transmissions. While some drips are normal, there shouldn’t ever be substantial

accumulations of any fluids.

6.1.7 Check the Transmission Oil Level

Once every two weeks, or more often if a transmission shifts erratically, check the transmission

oil level with the dipstick when the engine is running and in neutral gear. It is unlikely that any

oil will need to be added. Be sure to check under the transmission for leaks. Low transmission

oil is a serious matter.

The valve handle has a pointed end that points to the filter that is active. To switch, turn the valve to point to the backup filter.

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With the engine at idle and in neutral, remove the transmission dipstick. Wipe it with a towel,

reinsert, and remove to take a reading. If the level is below the add mark, stop the engine, add

a pint of transmission fluid through the plug on top of the transmission case. Start the engine

and measure again. Do not overfill, doing so could cause the seals to blow.

6.2 Engine Controls

The boat is fitted with Hynautic controls with five stations. Controls at each of the five stations

operate together; moving controls at one station moves them all. With five stations, the controls

are a little stiff to operate. Be aware it will take a little oomph to operate the shift and throttle

controls. The two black knob controls are the shift controls, and the two red knob controls are

the throttle controls.

The shift controls should be pointed straight up to be in neutral. There is a neutral detent so you

know when you have shifted into neutral from forward or reverse. Push forward all the way to

shift into forward, and pull back all the way to shift into reverse. It takes two seconds for the

shift to engage. Plan accordingly when maneuvering close quarters.

The throttle control should be pulled back all the way to be in idle. Pushing forward increases

the throttle. Do not shift the engine into gear if the throttle is not in idle position.

6.2.1 Station Transfer

Since the Hynautic system moves all controls together, there is no transfer of station needed. All

stations will have controls in the exact same position.

6.2.2 Synchronizing Engine RPM

The boat allows synchronized RPM from both engines operating from one throttle control. To

do so, switch the ‘SYNC’ lever from the middle to starboard position. Now the starboard throttle

control controls the RPM for both engines. Push the port throttle all the way forward so everyone

is aware that the boat is controlled by the starboard throttle.

To go back to independent throttle control, pull the port throttle back to match the starboard

throttle and switch the ‘SYNC’ toggle switch back to the middle (off) position.

When manuevering in close quarters, you may trun on the SLOW VESSEL switch that lowers the

engine RPMs and the boat will have a little less power and speed at idle. When you are done

with manuevering be sure to turn the SLOW VESSEL toggles to the down position (off).

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Engine control and display monitors. Before starting the engines, 1: SLOW VESSEL toggle switches should be in the down position (off); 2: SYNCH toggle should be in the center position (off) and P/H position.

Important: The ‘SYNC’ toggle switch must be in the center position when operating at low

speed; otherwise one of the engime may stop running.

6.2.3 Engine Start-Up

After you have completed the daily engine room check, you may start up the engines:

o Engine control levers in neutral.

o SYNCH toggle switch in middle position (off) and in P/H position.

o LOW SPEED toggle switch down position (off).

o ENG. DISPLAY and ENG. POWER breakers are ‘ON’ under each engine monitor.

o Turn both keys to the ‘ON’ position and ensure that the engine monitors are reading

engine status.

o Turn one key to start the engine and release back to ‘ON’ position.

o Repeat for the other engine.

6.2.4 Shaft Seals

The two shafts are equipped with packless, self-sealing shaft seals. These multi-seal propeller

shaft seals are dripless, so there is no leaking or spraying of seawater into the bilge. They are

cooled and lubricated by sea water from the main engines.

Note: If an engine fails and you need to operate the boat on one engine, the shaft of the failed

engine must be manually locked or secured to prevent rotation since the shaft seals will not be

getting any cooling water.

6.2.5 Main Engine Operating Parameters

The Caterpillar C15 ACERT engines are rated at 853 HP at their maximum RPM of 2300. Please

keep them at 1400 RPM or less to save fuel. The economical cruising speed is 1100 RPM, which

will push La Vida along at 9-10kts with a fuel burn of approximately 12 gph. It is also very

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important to slow the engines gradually and then idle them for 5-10 minutes before shutdown

to cool the bearings, especially those of the turbocharger which are very hot at high speeds. This

is easily accomplished as you enter harbors or set up anchor.

Engine Operating Parameters

RPM Fuel Burn

(g/h)

Speed

(knots)

Efficiency

(nm/g)

1,000 11.51 8.4 0.7

1,200 15.51 9.8 0.6

1,400 25.01 11.2 0.4

1,600 35.81 12.2 0.3

1,800 36.82

2,000 49.62

1. Measured values 2. Caterpillar engine specifical data sheet

Note: Cooling seawater is ejected under the hull which eliminates sound, and soot on the hull.

Consequently, you will not be able to see seawater flow through the exhaust ports.

6.3 Fuel System

The boat has four diesel fuel tanks with a total capacity of 1,850 gallons. Three forward tanks are

located between the engine room and the master stateroom. The fourth tank is located aft, in

the lazarette, which accessible from either the starboard or port deck hatches. Each tank has its

own fill and vent line, all located amidships on both sides. Two deck fill caps are located mid-ship

on the starboard side steps and one deck fill cap is located mid-ship on the port side deck steps.

The lazarette tank is normally left empty; the fill cap is located on the deck of the lanai. Each

deck fill is equipped with a screw cap engraved ‘DIESEL’. At the engine room forward bulkhead

are the three tank’s sight gauges. The fuel manifold is located in the lower middle of the

bulkhead, and there are cross-over valves at the bottom of the three engine room tanks to allow

fuel to flow level between them. This means you can fill all three tanks through one deck fill if

the cross-over valves are open. The cross-over valves are normally left open to allow easy fuel

fill and balance between the tanks.

6.3.1 Fuel Management

Consider the following when reviewing and planning fuel needs:

• Estimate high on fuel consumption

• Both the 20kW and 16kW generators use 1.7 GPH at full load

• Plan on a 20% reserve, a minimum of 350 gallons

6.3.2 Checking the Fuel Level

Fueling is a two-person task with one person in the engine room monitoring the sight gauges:

Each tank has a sight gauge. Each sight gauge has a shut-off valve at the top and bottom. Open

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both the top and bottom sight gauge valves and allow for the level to equalize. After fueling or

checking fuel levels, close the sight gauge valves. The engine room sight gauges have markings

in 50 gallon increments along the sight gauges.

6.3.3 Filling the Fuel Tanks

The fuel tank fills are located amidships, two deck fill caps are located mid-ship on the starboard

side steps and one deck fill cap is located mid-ship on the port side deck steps. If the cross-over

valves are open, all forward tanks may be filled from a single location.

Before You Start to Fuel

• Make sure the engines and generators are shut down and all ignition materials have been

extinguished.

• Make sure fire extinguishers, first aid kit, and clean-up materials are readily available.

• Grab and absorbent pad and make a hole in the middle of it for the fuel pump head to go

through and place it over the deck fill.

Fueling Procedure

• Open the cross-over valves and all three tank’s sight gauge valves.

• Have someone in the engine room to monitor the sight gauge during the fueling process.

You can communicate with your cell phones or hand-held VHF radios.

• Make sure the overflow vent is visible and unobstructed.

• Fuel spills are the responsibility of the person operating the fueling hose. Fueling can

be messy. Have an absorbent pad from the engine room at the ready.

• Open the DIESEL cap with the spanner wrench/key located in the document drawer at the

helm.

• Insert the nozzle into the fill valve, and start the flow.

• As the tank fills, listen for sputters and watch the fuel vent. It will gurgle before the tank

is full. Your goal is to stop pumping BEFORE fuel spurts out of the vent.

• The person monitoring the sight gauges should communicate the remaining level in

inches as the tanks fill.

• Do not overfill the tanks. Stop when the fuel level reaches the top on the center tank

sight tube.

When fueling is completed, put the hose back on the dock, screw the fill cap back in place, and

return the key to the drawer marked “keys” in the main salon (by the staircase to the helm).

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7.0 Electronic Aids to Navigation

• VHF radio

• Autopilot and Ruder Angle Indicator

• Chart plotter

• Radar

• Sounder

• Automatic Identification System (AIS)

La Vida is equipped with a variety of electronic equipment to aid with navigation and cruising

safety. Each device has a dedicated, or shared circuit on a 12-volt DC panel. Breaker switchs for

the electronics are on the right-hand side of the panel and must be in the ‘ON’ position. Some

of the labels are in a small font, for example the Furuno Sounder breaker switch is near the

bottom of the panel and is easily overlooked. This breaker must be on for depth data to be

displayed on the chartplotter.

7.1 VHF radio

La Vida has Icom M604 VHF radios at the pilot house

helm station with remote microphone mounted to the

right of the helm below the countertop. In the flybridge,

an Icom M504 VHF radio is mounted at the helm station.

7.2 Autopilot and rudder indicator

La Vida has a Simrad AP 28 autopilot with a rudder

angle indicator bar at the bottom of the display screen.

This autopilot will hold a compass course when in

‘AUTO’ mode. This unit is not interfaced with the chart

plotter and therefore will not maintain the boat on the

plotted course. You will need to adjust the autopilot to

account for being set by wind and currents. The display

on the autopilot indicates which mode the pilot is in:

A – autopilot mode holds the boat on a compass course

S – Standby mode; the helms person has manual control of the helm

X - Pilot station does not have control; remote station has control of helm.

The numerical display is the compass course that the boat is on.

At the bottom of the display, the angle of the rudder is indicated, for example, in photo above,

the rudder is 2° to the starboard.

To take control of the autopilot at the flybridge or at the pilothouse, press the AUTO or STBY

key.

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Basic operation of the autopilot is controlled by the buttons and knob on the right side of the

pilot display.

PWR

Press once to power on

Press and hold for power off (3 secnds)

Press for backlighting adjustment

AUTO Engages autopilot to maintain current compass course

STBY Disenges autopilot

Rotory knob Adjusts course

<- -> keys

at knob Adjusts course by 1° for each press or 10° if held.

TURN

Press once to enter a turn selection menu (see manual)

Press twice for manual steering to dodge an object, press once

more to resume your compass course.

Knob Turn knob to adjust course, each click is one degree

You will primarily be using the STBY and AUTO buttons to enter autopilot mode or manual

steering mode. If you need to dodge an object such as a log or floating debris, push STBY and

hand steer to avoid the object then return to your compass course and push the AUTO button.

To adjust your course as needed use the arrow keys or turn the knob.

7.3 Chartplotter and Radar

La Vida has a Furuno NavNet 3D navigation system network with 2 Mult-Function Displays

(MFDs) in the pilot house and one MFD on the flybridge. With the two MFD, you can configure

multiple screen views so that you can display the chartplotter, radar, and sounder at the same

time. Controls for the system are on a panel on the dashboard. The radar is integrated in the

Furuno NavNet system and can be viewed on the MFD.

Furuno training videos are available at:

https://www.furunousa.com/en/get_support/learning_center/videos/navnet_3d_training_videos

And, on YouTube:

Part 1. Keyboard layout: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRyDPsy9WlY

Part 2. Introduction to chartplotter basics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjKMJhOL6N4

Part 3. Creating points and routes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPN-kOC8v2U

Note: Electronic aids to navigation are tools to assist you with navigating through the islands

and reefs in our cruising area. You are, however, responsible to always know your location, and

to operate in a safe manner. Rule 5 of the Navigation Rules of the Road state:

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“Every vessel shall at all times maintain a proper lookout by sight and hearing as well as

by all available means appropriate in the prevailing circumstances and conditions so as

to make a full appraisal of the situation and of the risk of collision.” (COLREGS Rule #5).

We recommend that as you are learning to use the chart plotter, a second crew member should

be with you to keep watch as you are cruising. It is quite easy to become distracted with the

navigation electronics.

7.4 Sounder

The Furuno sounder is interfaced with the chartplotter. The Furuno Sounder breaker switch must

be turned on. Depth will be displayed on the MFD screen and a plot of depth can be selected in

the display menu.

7.5 Automated Identification System

La Vida is equipped with Class B AIS. This system sends and receives position and vessel

information with other boats. The positions of the nearby boats are displayed on the chart

plotter. Additional information of the other vessels can be displayed by selecting the target on

the screen. This tool is useful for avoidance of collision and identifying other vessels so that you

can call them on the VHF radio.

8.0 Maneuvering

• Docking and Undocking

• Maneuvering in the Harbor

‘Slow is Pro’. Maneuver the boat using the engines at idle speed and in neutral much of the time.

Rudders should always be in center position; use the bow and stern thrusters to steer the boat.

The thrusters are hydraulic and be operated for extended burts for maneuvering. You may turn

the SLOW VESSEL toggle switches up to the on position when maneuvering in close quarters. This

will lower the engine RPMs, power and speed of the boat. Be sure switch the SLOW VESSEL toggle

off when you are done.

8.1 Docking & Undocking

Have the fenders out and lines prepped beforehand. The stern line should be passed out from

the stern cleat through the hawspipe and placed on the bulwark. The spring line should also be

passed through the midship hawspipe with the end out a foot or so and reachable from the

dockside. The bowline should be passed from the cleat to outside the stanchions and draped so

it can be reached from the dock. Never put a line from the cleat over the handrails as the boat’s

weight will bend or break the rail if it pulls against the line.

Using the wing stations on the dock side will give you full visibility of the entire length of the boat

and the dock. Usually, it is easier to dock bow in. Have your mate at the swim platform, ready

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the step off the secure the stern line. Use the stern thruster to ease the stern in against the dock

so the mate can step onto the dock. Secure the stern line, and then use the thrusters as needed

to allow the mate to secure the bow and spring lines so the boat rests against the stern and

midships fenders.

8.2 Maneuvering in a Harbor

On a twin screw vessel with both bow and stern thrusters, it will be easiest if you center the

rudders and steer with the engines and thrusters. The large props make the boat respond

exceedingly well. Take your time and make small adjustmentsto the momentum of the boat by

putting the engine in gear and out when you feel it engage. Take control of the thrusters by

pressing the green button on the thruster control unit. Use the thrusters to maneuver the boat

in tight spots. The thrusters are hydraulic so don’t worry about overheating the thruster. They

are variable speed proportional to the angle of the joystick, so you can slowly ease the boat

against or away from the dock.

Captain Joseph D. Coons, an associate of ours prepared an instructional booklet titled

“Maneuvering Inboard-Engine Power Boats” which, is available from our charter office and on

our website:

https://6297347.fs1.hubspotusercontent-

na1.net/hubfs/6297347/Files%20for%20Public%20Sharing%20Online/Maneuvering%20Inboard-

Engine%20Power%20Boats.pdf

9.0 Anchoring

• Setting the Anchor

• Hauling the Anchor

• Stern tie

• Rafting

Preparing for anchoring is an important step so that I can be accomplished safely for you and the

boat. Before attempting to anchor, select an anchorage with a soft bottom such as mud, sand,

or gravel if possible. Look at the charts and cruising guides for tips on good locations. Then,

choose the spot in the anchorage where you have room to swing on anchor without disturbing

other boats. Remember, responsibility for leaving room goes to each successive boat that

arrives. Here, in the Northwest, because of the deep waters, we anchor a little differently than

in the Gulf of Mexico or Caribbean.

First, we use anchor chain scopes of only 4-to-1 or 5-to-1. For example, in water that is 40’ deep

at high tide in the typical anchorage, we might use 200’ of chain unless the weather was to be

gale force or greater winds. This allows for the 10’ or so bow pulpit above the water for a total

of 50’ above the bottom at high tide.

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Second, because of the small bays and steep bottoms, we sometimes rig a shoreline from the

stern of the boat to shore. The best example of this would be Todd Inlet and Buchart Gardens.

This bay can accommodate 8 – 10 boats, yet it is only about 150’ wide and 200’ long. Boats attach

their bows to the mooring buoys, or in a few cases, anchor, and their sterns are secured to rings

provided in the steep cliffs overlooking the bay. Boats are perhaps 15-20’ apart, side to side.

Third, in crowded harbors we will often raft the boats toget side by side in busy marinas, although

this isn’t very common.

Note: The windlass breaker switches are to the

right of the helm near to the floor, below the

generator panel.

The primary anchor is the 176-pound Ultra

anchor on the port side. Use the Port Windlass

for setting and retrieving the anchor

9.1 Setting the Anchor

Anchoring safely requires two persons, one at the helm maneuvering the boat, and one on the

bow operating the anchor. The person at the helm puts the bow of the boat over the spot where

the anchor is to be placed after checking the depth sounder. The person at the bow uses the

windlass foot switches to lower the anchor slowly onto the bottom. The person at the bow

signals the helmsman to maneuver the boat as needed to lay out chain and set the anchor.

When the anchor reaches the bottom, signal the helmsman to back away by into reverse for 2

seconds and then back to neutral. Resume lowering the anchor while backing away to lay out

chain until the desired amount of chain is out. Keep the boat backing away with engaging reverse

and then neutral. When you have reached the desired scope stop paying out chain. Engage

reverse as before until the chain starts to pulls up straight off the bow towards the anchor. A

straight steady chain indicates a set anchor.

NEVER pull on the chain for more than 3 seconds or in excess of one knot, and NEVER at any

engine RPM more than idle. Doing so forcefully will bend the anchor or damage the mooring

gear.

If when checking the set, the chain rumbles and clunks, and seems to release in bursts, it means

you are anchoring on a rocky bottom and the anchor is not holding. Be patient. It may not set

on first try, and you ma have to repeat the process to get a good set.

Attach the bridle, stowed in the starboard bridge bench seat locker, secure the chain in front of

the anchor roller with the chain hook and lower the chain until the lines to the bow cleats are

taut, and creating a slack loop in the anchor chain. The anchor bridle accomplishes three goals:

1. It takes the strain of the anchor off the windlass, pulpit, and pulpit pulley and directs it to

the bow cleats which are more suited to hold it;

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2. It reduces substantially the “chain noise” transmitted to the occupants of the forward

cabin;

3. It allows the anchor rode to have a lower angle relative to the sea bottom, thus increasing

the anchor’s holding power

9.2 Retrieving the Anchor

1. The engines should always be at idle when you are retrieving the anchor.

2. Ensure that the Maxwell Windlass breakers are on.

3. Turn on the saltwater washdown pump. The hose is in a bucket in the bridge fender

locker.

4. Connect the hose to the port spigot to rinse the chain and anchor.

5. Press the up-foot button to bring up the anchor chain and remove the bridle.

6. Continue to press the up-foot button to bring up the anchor chain, stopping as needed

to clean the chain.

7. Wash the chain with plenty of sea water before it comes over the roller to keep the

mud off the boat. Try to create a waterfall of water down the chain to remove all mud

and debris. Do not stow a muddy or debris filled chain.

8. As the chain tightens and starts to bog down the windlass, wait until the boat catches

up, then continue. Don’t drag the boat by the anchor chain through the water.

9. The anchor chain tends to build up (castle) in the anchor locker when being

retrieved. We have found that its important to have a crew member help distribute

the chain as it pools in the locker in order to allow all of it to be retrieved without

clogging the hawes pipe.

10. when the anchor is clear of the water, make sure it is clear of mud. A boat brush and

hose may be needed.

11. Be careful in the last couple of feet to make sure the anchor is facing the proper

direction.

12. Attach the anchor safety line and lower the chain stopper.

13. Release the tension on the chain slightly to take the strain off the windlass.

9.3 Shore Tie or Stern Tie

In many anchorages, especially in the Gulf Islands of British Columbia there are rings or chains

secured to the rocky shoreline that are used to tie the stern of the boat toward the shore. Stern

tying will keep the boat in position and will eliminate swinging while at anchor. More boats can

occupy an anchorage when they are tied to the shore. You can also pass your stern line around

a sturdy tree and then return it to the boat. Have your tender launched and tied alongside of

the boat before you anchor so that it will be ready to take the stern line to shore.

To stern tie:

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1. Select your spot to drop your anchor so that you will have adequate scope when you are stern tied.

2. Anchor as described above and back toward your selected stern tie location. 3. When the anchor is set, have two crew members take the end of the stern tie line to the

shore and pass it through the ring, chain, or around a tree and return with the end back to the boat.

4. The person at the helm should keep the boat in position as the tender crew is working with the stern tie line.

5. When the stern tie line is secured, pull the slack out of the line, and adjust the anchor chain as needed.

6. When the boat is in the intended position, set the anchor bridle as described above.

Note: Always take the tide into

consideration; at low tide, be

sure there is enough depth

under the keel to prevent

grounding. At high tide, be sure

there is adequate scope in the

anchor chain.

9.4 Rafting

We often tie our boats up alongside each other on our flotilla trips or in crowded harbors. This

is an effective way to reduce our footprint in a cozy cove. The flotilla Captain will first get the

lead boat secure in position with an anchor and stern tie and then will call each boat into the

raft and coach them as they approach the raft. When all the boats are rafted up, the lead-boat

crew will then use our tender to set the anchors and assist with shore-tie lines of the two boats

on the ends of the raft. When complete, the raft will be very secure with three anchors out and

three stern tie lines.

To raft to another boat, you will need:

1. Fenders set alongside the boat in a position to protect the boat from your neighbor 2. One bow line ready to tie up with your neighbor 3. One stern line leading out through the transom hawsepipe 4. Two long spring lines:

a. one from midship leading aft b. one from stern leading forward

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Nine-boat raft in Melanie Cove, Desolation Sound. Three anchors and three stern ties secure the boats in position.

9.5 Anchor and Ground Tackle

9.5.1 Primary Anchor

The primary anchor is an Ultra UA-80 176 lb. anchor mounted on the port side of the bowsprit

with 400 feet of chain.

9.5.2 Secondary Anchor

The secondary anchor is a Delta 110 lb. anchor mounted on the starboard side of the bowsprit

with 400 feet of chain

9.5.3 Anchor Chain Markings

Both anchor chains are marked with yellow and red paint designating the following lengths:

20 feet from anchor Yellow – Red - Yellow

50 feet Yellow

100 feet Red

150 feet Yellow

200 feet Red

250 feet Yellow

300 feet Red

350 feet Yellow

20 feet from bitter end of chain Red – Yellow - Red

400 feet Red

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9.5.4 Anchor Windlass

The anchor windlasses are 24V Maxwell 3500s. With

two foot-switches and remote control stations at the

lower helm. Windlass breakers are located below the

generator control panel.

9.5.5 Lowering the Anchor

The anchor windlasses can be controlled both at the

helm and by foot pedal switches at the anchor

platform.

9.5.6 Raising the Anchor

The anchor windlasses can be controlled both at the

helm and by foot pedal switches at the anchor

platform.

9.5.7 Chain Locker

The all chain anchor rode runs from the anchor, over

the bow roller, around the chain wheel, and down

through the hawsepipe into the chain locker. There are

separate port and starboard chain lockers for each

anchor. The chain locker is accessed through the wall hatch above the VIP stateroom berth.

9.5.8 Anchor Bridle

The anchor bridle is stored in the starboard bridge bench seat locker. The bridle consists of two

lengths of nylon line and a chain hook that latches onto a link of the anchor chain. After your

anchor is confidently set, always rig the anchor bridle.

9.5.9 Anchor Rode Jams

As the anchor enters the chain locker, the pile of chain might occasionally tumble into the bottom

of the chain locker. If the chain falls into a tumble, the chain may back up into the hawsepipe

causing a jam at the windlass. Stop and windlass and send a crewmember down to the VIP berth

to access the chain locker and knock the pile over.

Be careful when dealing with the chain. If a crew member is operating the windlass while a

person is accessing the chain locker, be especially careful to keep that person’s fingers, hands,

arms, etc. away from the chain. Use the windlass handle or broomstick to deal with the chain.

If the chain jams while lowering the anchor, it is because one loop of the chain on top of the pile

has fallen inside another loop of chain. There is no way the chain can become tangled so you will

never need to disconnect it. One easy way to disengtangle the chain is, while wearing gloves,

grasp the chain on the forward side of the windlass, and while lifting it above the wildcat

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manually, rapidly yank it up and down. This will usually free it. If it does not, look in the chain

locker and un-overlap the layers of chain in the pile.

Be sure to leave the windlass breakers ‘OFF’ when not in use. This prevents damage in the

event that the footswitch fails.

9.5.10 Saltwater Washdown Pump

The boat is equipped with a salt water pump in the engine room, a spigot on the port side bow

pulpit, and a hose to wash down the anchor chain when hauling anchor. The spigot on the

starboard side is fresh water. Use only if necessary as this will use up the freshwater FAST.

For the system to operate, turn on the ‘salt water pump’ breaker on the 12V panel. Turn off the

pump when you are done with it to prevent pump cycling.

The saltwater pump, sea-cock, and strainer are located mid-forward port hull in the engine room.

10.0 Bilge Pumps

Ensure that the bilge pumps and high water alarm

circuit breakers are always on. They are not

controlled by the main battery switch on the DC

panel. The bilge pumps are controlled by 3-way

switches mounted on the overhead dashboard above

the pilothouse helm. The up position is ON, the

middle position is OFF, and the down position is

AUTO. Leave the bilge switches in the down position

so they will automatically switch on as needed. The

bilge pump counters are on the left side of overhead

instrument panel. Each time a bilge pump switches on, the appropriate counter will be

incremented by one click. If the bilge pumps are turned on often, investigate the source of the

leak into the bilge.

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11.0 Bow and Stern Thrusters

La Vida is equipped with both bow and stern thrusters. These

thrusters are hydraulic and can operate for extended bursts

without overheating. The main engines must be running for the

hydraulic pumps to operate for the thrusters to work. Controls for

the thrusters are at each of the five control stations and are turned

on by pressing the green button. The thrusters are variable speed

relative to how far you push the joystick control. To stop the

thruster you must return the joystick to the center position; they

do not snap back to center. When you are done with the thrusters,

press the red button to disengage the hydraulic pumps.

12.0 Roll Stabilizers

The boat is fitted with an ABT TRAC hydraulic fin type

active stabilizer system that reduce the roll of the

boat when underway and reach full effectiveness at

speeds over 7.5 knots. The stabilizer hydraulic

pumps are driven by the port engine and the fins on

the underside of the vessel are controlled by a

control head at the pilothouse helm.

12.1.1 Caution

• The stabilizer system MUST BE OPERATING whenever the vessel is underway.

• Stabilizers component damage could occur if the vessel is MANEUVERED or REVERSED when the fins are not ‘CENTERED’

• Any fin that cannot be in the ‘ACTIVE’ or ‘CENTERED’ state needs to be mechanically pinned as soon as possible.

12.1.2 Start-up Procedure

1. Startup engines

2. Turn ‘ON’ the circuit breaker labeled STABILIZERS on the 24V panel.

3. ENABLE both fins at the control panel.

4. CENTER fins at the control panel

5. Normal operation of stabilizer is CENTER or ACTIVE

6. CENTER the fins when entering a harbor or when docking

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13.0 Tender, Davit, and Outboard Motor

1000 lb. Marquipt Davit on the flybridge is operated

with a remote control that is stored in the starboard

flybridge cabinet along with spare parts and oil for

the outboard engine. The davit circuit breaker

switch is on the 24V DC panel. The remote operated

the davit arm up, down, left, right and spools out the

cable.

Launching the dingy is a two-person operation. One

person operating the davit and another controlling

the movement of the dingy.

To launch the inflatable tender:

1. Install the plug at the bottom of the transom of the dingy, on the outside,

2. Plug in remote control on side of davit arm,

3. Turn on davit breaker on 24 V panel,

4. Spool out cable and release the carabiner from lanyard,

5. Raise the davit arm so that carabiner is directly over the ring in the center of lifting bridle

and connect the carabiner to the bridle,

6. Release the hold-down straps,

7. Raise the engine slightly so that it will not scrape on the deck as the dingy is lifted.

8. Raise and steady the motion of the dingy to a position where it will clear the rail.

9. Swing the davit arm and dingy over the port side of the boat.

10. Lower the dingy over the side and into the water.

11. Secure the stern line and bow line to the side of the boat.

12. Remove the carabiner from the bridle and stow the davit.

13. Lower the outboard motor into the water.

14. Squeeze the fuel bulb in the fuel line near the motor until firm.

15. Turn on battery switch.

16. Push up as you turn the ignition key to engage the automatic choke.

a. The engine should start right away, if not, try again with short turns of the ignition.

17. Release the key when the engine starts and allow it to warm up for a few minutes.

18. The driver should clip the ‘kill switch’ lanyard onto their PFD.

a. This is a new coast guard requirement.

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14.0 Troubleshooting

If you are having trouble, please call our on-call technician at 360-393-5309 for help.

14.1 Engine overheating

An engine will overheat if there is significant debris in the basket inside of the sea strainer that

is restricting the flow of water through the heat exchanger and out the transom of the engine

• Is the engine temperature gauge reading higher than 210°F?

• Is there significant debris in the sea water strainer?

To clean the seawater strainer:

1. Seawater is supplied through a thru-hull valve located forward of each engine. 2. Close the thru hull valve by turning the handle perpendicular to valve. 3. Open the top of the strainer by hand; the cap should be hand-tight. 4. Pull out the basket and dump the debris into the garbage. Replace basket into strainer 5. Screw the top back into position and tighten to snub, do not overtighten 6. Open the valve at the bottom of the seawater strainer. 7. Start up the engine, and check for water flow through the seawater cooling system 8. Check for leaks at the seawater strainer. 9. Monitor engine temperature.

14.2 Fuel filter

If an engine begins to slow down for no apparent reason, the fuel filter may be clogged, and

you will need to go to the engine room and switch to the backup filter.

To switch fuel filters:

1. Slow the engines down to idle and shift the engines into neutral. 2. Have a crewmember take watch as you enter the engine room. 3. Turn the valve handle at the front of the Racor filter so that it points toward the backup

filter. 4. Check the fuel filter of the other engine, if there is excessive sediment, switch that filter

as well. 5. Let the engine idle for a minute before increasing the throttle to cruising speed.

14.3 Outboard motor

A cold outboard motor may be reluctant to start, be patient and try a few times. If the motor

will not start:

1. Check the gear shift lever to be sure that it is neutral. 2. Check the gas tank vent. 3. Squeeze the fuel line bulb until firm. 4. Advance the free-throttle arm. 5. Try starting again.

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14.4 Low battery

Having a low battery may indicate that it has been charged adequately and/or some lights are

left on. Check the breaker switches to be sure that unused circuits are turned off. Review

section 5.1.5

1. Start up one of the generators and switch the AC Selector switch to the corresponding generator.

2. Be sure the INVERTER and BATTERY CHARGER breaker switches are on. 3. Be sure the MASTER BREAKER switch is on. 4. Check the AC voltmeter, it should read 110 volts or more. 5. The ammeter should read an amp draw of 20 amps or so. 6. Let the batteries charge until the Inverter reads Float Charge.

14.5 Anchor

14.5.1 Anchor chain is stuck in anchor locker

If the anchor chain becomes tangled, it will not come up out of the locker. You will need to sort

this out down below in the forward cabin.

1. Turn off the windlass switch. 2. Pull all the bedding and mattress from the forward bunk. 3. Open the chain locker. 4. You may need to pull the chain out of the locker onto the forward bunk. There may be a

tarp or a rug from the floor you can use to control the mess. 5. Sort the chain out so that it can be deployed with the anchor. 6. When you pick up the anchor, have a crew member flake the chain in the locker to

prevent the chain from piling up and falling over onto itself.

14.5.2 Anchor is stuck on the bottom

If the anchor is firmly attached to the bottom:

1. Maneuver the boat so that it is directly over the anchor, 2. Pull all the slack chain up so that the chain is straight up and down, 3. Set the brake on the windlass, 4. Motor forward over the anchor in the opposite direction than you set the anchor, 5. You will feel the anchor break loose from the bottom, 6. Release the windlass brake and pull the anchor up.

14.5.3 Anchor windlass will not turn

1. Check the windlass brake, if it is tight, it will prevent the windlass from turning. 2. Check to windlass switch, it should be on, and the light should be on. 3. Sometimes the foot switches fail; try raising or lowering the anchor with the switches on

the windlass switch panel. 4. If the windlass switch and light is on, the break is loose, and the windlass still will not

turn using the foot switches or switches at the helm, you may need to use the windlass

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handle to raise the anchor. The handle fits into the collar next to the gypsy chain drum. Using this manual retrieval is slow and tedious but you will get the anchor back.

14.6 Toilet will not flush

If one of the toilets will not flush check the breaker switch on the 12-volt DC panel, it should be

on. If both toilets will not flush, the holding tank may be full, and you will need to pump out the

holding tank.

In case of a clogged toilet, get the plunger stored in the port side bridge bench hatch (forward

of the pilot house). DO NOT use a plunger as you normally would, instead put the plunger into

the bowl, and hold it down firmly against the bowl to create a seal around the plunger. Push

the switch to flush the head while holding down the plunger. The high-pressure jet of water

will force the clog through to the holding tank.

14.7 Freshwater does not flow at faucet

Check to see if the ‘FRESH WATER PUMP I’ breaker switch is on at the 120V AC panel, or ‘FRESH

WATER PUMP II’ breaker switch on the 12-volt DC panel is on. Use the AC pump if the

generator is running or you are plugged into shorepower. Use the DC pump if there is no AC

input.

If the tanks are empty, water from the faucet will be mixed with air and may cause the

freshwater pump to lose its prime. You will need to fill the water tanks either at the dock or

with the watermaker. When there is water in the tanks, the freshwater pump should prime

itself when it operates.

14.8 Hitting a log

Please keep a good look out to avoid hitting logs and other debris in the water. If you do hit a

log or debris:

1. Throttle back to idle immediately and shift the engines to neutral until you are well past danger.

2. If the hit was significant, check for damage, 3. Check the bilges for any water coming in, 4. Check the lazarette for water, 5. If water is coming into the boat, you are in an emergency; go to Emergency Procedures. 6. If no water is flowing into the boat, then put the boat back into gear at idle speed, is the

boat vibrating? a. If so, the propeller and or propeller shaft has been bent. You may be able to

motor to a protected harbor at idle speed or with a single engine. Keep both engines running but, if necessary, use only one engine in gear.

b. Call NW Explorations immediately at 360-393-5309 c. If not, slowly throttle up to cruising speed and check for vibration. You were

lucky this time. Keep a good watch to avoid debris, rocks and reefs.2

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14.9 Hitting a rock or submerged object

1. Throttle back to idle immediately and shift the engines to neutral. 2. Are all crew members onboard and uninjured? 3. If the hit was significant, check for damage, 4. Check the bilges for any water coming in; forward bilge is under the floor in the forward

cabin, midship bilge is in the engine room and aft bilge is in the lazarette. 5. If water is coming into the boat, you are in an emergency; go to Emergency Procedures. 6. If no water is flowing into the boat, are you hard aground? 7. If so, are you in immediate danger.

a. if so, go to Emergency Procedures. b. If not, will the rising tide lift you off?

8. Call NW Explorations immediately at 360-393-5309. 9. If possible, launch the inflatable tender and have it standing by. 10. If possible, back off from the rock or object as the tide lifts the boat up. 11. Idle into a protected harbor and dock or anchor.

14.10 Running into a fishing net

Give a wide berth to fishing activities and keep a good look out for nets and other objects in the

water. Gill nets are difficult to see until you are close. If you cannot determine where a net

ends, head for the fishing boat and pass by in front of the boat, the net is usually attached to

the stern of the boat. If you do run into a net:

1. Throttle back to idle immediately and shift the engines to neutral. 2. Do not try to back out, this will foul the propellers and damage the net. 3. Try to push the net away with boat hooks. 4. Launch the inflatable tender and use it to pull the boat out of the net. 5. Allow the fisherman to assist. 6. You may need a diver to help untangle the net from your propellers.

Note: You are responsible for the damage to fishing gear; you will need to contact the

fisherman to arrange compensation for any damage to their nets or other fishing equipment.

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15.0 Operating Checklists

15.1 Engine Room Checks

1. Coolant level in expansion tanks

2. Sea strainer and through hulls: clear of debris

3. Oil absorbent pads under engines

4. Fuel filters and fuel manifold

5. Oil level in engines

15.2 Starting Engines

o All lines clear of propellers

o Engine control levers in neutral

o SYNCH toggle switch in middle position (off)

o Engine control and monitor breakers are ‘ON’ under each engine monitor

o Turn both keys to the ‘ON’ position and ensure that the engine monitors are reading

engine status.

o Turn one key to start the engine and release back to ‘ON’ position.

o Repeat for the other engine.

15.3 After the Engines Have Started

o Turn on Electronics

o Trim Tabs

o Autopilot

o Monitors

o Chart plotter

o Furuno Sounder

o Sonar

o AIS

o Sounder

o Stabilizers

o Thrusters

o Radar

o Check cooling water flow – the exhaust is underwater so check cooling water flow by

touching the heat exchanger on engine

o Check the engine and generator rooms to ensure there are no oil, water, fuel leaks and

that all loose equipment are properly secured.

o Close and secure the engine room door.

o Center the rudder.

o Ensure stabilizers are in the locked position.

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15.4 Stopping the Engines

o SYNCH toggle switch must be in the middle positon (off).

o Throttle back to idle speed, shift to neutral, and allow engines to idle for a few minutes

to cool down.

o For each engine, push to red stop button until the engine stops.

o Turn the key to ‘OFF’ position for each engine.

o Turn the engine control and engine monitor breakers to ‘OFF’.

15.5 Starting the Generator(s)

o Hold Preheat to the right for 10 seconds.

o While holding preheat, hold the start button until the gauges show the generator has

started.

o Release both buttons.

o Let the generator run for about 5 minutes to warm up.

15.6 Switch from Shore Power

o Shut off AC 220V breakers.

o Turn black knobs to generator 1 or generator 2 (whichever the light is on).

o Turn on AC 220V breakers.

o Shut off AC 110V breakers.

o Turn black knobs to generator 1 or generator 2 (whichever the light is on).

o Turn on AC 110V breakers.

o Turn black shore power knobs to off.

o Turn off breaker at dock

o Disconnect and stow the shore power cables.

15.7 Stopping the Generator(s)

o Shut off breakers.

o Let the generator run for about 5 minutes to cool down.

o Shut off the generator.

15.8 Switch from Generator to Inverter

o Shut off breakers.

o Turn left black knob to inverter.

o Turn right black knob to off.

o Turn on AC 110V breakers.

o Let the generator run for about 5 minutes to cool down.

o Shut off the generator.

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15.9 Preparing to Leave the Dock

o Ensure stabilizers are locked.

o Center the rudders.

o Shore power cables disconnected and stowed.

o Navigation electronics are on.

o Running lights on if required.

o VHF radios turned on and volume checked.

o Doors and hatches secured.

o Lines removed and secured.

15.10 Immediately After Leaving the Dock

o Stow fenders and lines.

15.11 Normal Cruising

o Helmsperson on watch at all times.

o RPM under 1200 RPM until engines warms to 140F.

o Always throttle back to idle before engaging forward or reverse gear.

15.12 Approaching Dock

o Ensure stabilizers are locked.

o Center the rudders.

o Thrusters on with the appropriate helm station enabled (push “start”).

o Fenders out on appropriate side and adjusted to a few inches above the water.

o Dock lines rigged through fairleads, not over rails and secured to cleats.

o Bow lines outside stanchions and bloused around stanchions towards bridge.

15.13 Arriving at Dock

o Lines secure, including spring lines.

o Shutdown engines.

o Running lights ‘OFF’.

o Connect to shore power.

o Turn ‘ON’ inverter charger.

15.14 Connecting to Shore Power

o Connect shore power cord to shore power using Glendinning Cablemaster. Ensure that

Cablemaster breaker is turned on and use the swith in the cabinet to deploy and retrieve

the cable.

o Turn on circuit breaker on the dock

o Switch shore power system selector select to aft or rear.

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o Shut off AC 220V breakers.

o Turn black knobs to shore power 1 or shore power 2 (whichever the light is on).

o Turn on AC 220V breakers.

o Shut off AC 110V breakers.

o Turn black knobs to shore power 1 or shore power 2 (whichever the light is on).

o Turn on AC 110V breakers.

15.15 Anchoring

o The boat should be idling facing into the wind.

o Ensure that the windlass breakers are on.

o Release the anchor safety line and chain stopper.

o Press the down switch to lower the selected anchor.

o Let out the proper amount of rode based on scope desired. Chain length marks are listed

below.

o Move the throttle in and out of reverse to lay out chain straight ahead.

o After the proper amount of rode is laid out, put the throttles in reverse for three seconds

to tug and set the anchor.

o Attach the bridle, stowed in the starboard bridge bench seat locker, secure the chain in

front of the anchor roller with the chain hook and lower the chain until the lines to the

bow cleats are taut, and lower chain an addition 10 feet or more to create a weighted

loop in the anchor chain.

o Perform an anchor watch for the first 30 minutes.

o Both anchor chains are marked with yellow and red paint designating the following

lengths:

10 feet from anchor Red - Yellow - Red

50 feet Yellow

100 feet Red

150 feet Yellow

200 feet Red

250 feet Yellow

300 feet Red

350 feet Yellow

400 feet Red

10 feet from bitter end of chain Red - Yellow - Red

When the anchor has reached the bottom begin backing away with both engines in reverse for 3

seconds and continue to lower chain. Continue backing slowly and lowering chain until the

desired length of chain is in the water (generally 4:1 scope). Set the anchor by a short pull in

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reverse. When the anchor chain lifts out of the water in a straight line, the anchor is set. La Vida

has enough power to plow the anchor through the bottom, doing so will drag the anchor and you

will need to reset the anchor.

If the chain rumbles, clunks, and seems to release in bursts, it means that the anchor is dragging

across a rocky bottom and is not setting. Be patient; it may grab, or you may need to reset the

anchor.

15.16 Pulling up Anchor

o The engines should always be idling when you are retrieving the anchor.

o Ensure that the windlass breakers are on.

o Turn on the saltwater washdown pump. The hose is at port bridge bench locker.

o Connect the hose to the port spigot to rinse the chain and anchor.

o Press the up-foot button to bring up the anchor chain and remove the bridle.

o Continue to press the up-foot button to bring up the anchor chain, stopping as needed to

clean the chain.

o Wash the chain with plenty of sea water before it comes over the roller to keep the mud

off the boat. Try to create a waterfall of water down the chain to remove all mud and

debris. Do not stow a muddy or debris filled chain.

o As the chain tightens and starts to bog down the windlass, wait until the boat catches up,

then continue. Do not pull the boat forward by the anchor chain through the water.

o When the anchor is clear of the water, make sure it is clear of mud. A boat brush and

hose may be needed.

o Raise the anchor from the water with short bursts of the windlass; be sure that the anchor

is facing the proper direction.

o The anchor chain tends to build up (castle) in the anchor locker when being retrieved. We

have found that its important to have a crew member help distribute the chain as it pools

in the locker in order to allow all of it to be retrieved without clogging the hawes pipe.

o Attach the anchor safety line and lower the chain stopper.

o Release the tension on the chain slightly to take the strain off the windlass.

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16.0 Emergency Procedures

Protect your Crew and Yourself

1. Assemble your crew; is everybody OK. Is anybody injured and in need of first aid. 2. Put on life jackets. 3. Contact the Coast Guard with an emergency “MAYDAY” call on Channel 16.

a. MAYDAY is appropriate if life is at risk. b. PAN PAN is appropriate if life is not at risk.

4. If adrift, prepare to anchor to keep the boat from drifting into danger. 5. If the boat is really sinking, consider “beaching it” if necessary. 6. Launch the inflatable tender and prepare to board if necessary.

a. Take a handheld VHF radio and tender dry bag, b. Wear life jackets.

When your Crew is Safe

1. Call NW Exploration at 360-393-5309. 2. In a true emergency, you are authorized to call for immediate commercial assistance as needed

for the safety of your crew and the boat. 3. If not an emergency,

a. At moderate speed motor to the closest harbor to dock or anchor. b. IF needed, a NW Exploration technician will travel to you to assistance. c. NW Explorations must give approval for any work completed by other mechanics or

vessel-assist if you are to be reimbursed for the cost of assistance.

If you think it may not be an emergency

1. If you have any concern about your long-term safety, contact the Coast Guard, on VHF Channel 16 advising them about your situation, so they can be prepared to provide assistance when needed. You may also use the urgent ‘PAN PAN’ call on VHF Channel 16.

2. Assign tasks to crew members to monitor the status and safety of the boat and crew while you work to stabilize any damage. For example, delegate your mate to keep a watch for hazards, or to operate the boat on course slowly while you deal with the difficulty.

3. Checklist for solving the problem: a. Identify and isolate the problem. b. Find the manuals. c. Find the tools and parts. d. Call NW Explorations for advice and help.

Calling for Assistance

1. If you need assistance, first please call NW Exploration 360-393-5309. 2. If you need to be towed call:

Capt. Richard Rodriguez Director of Operations Zenith Maritime 360.531.0698 VHF Channel 16 Members of TowBoat US may call 800-391-4869

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air conditioning ........................................................ 16

AIS ............................................................................ 32

Anchor ..................................................................... 37

anchor bridle ........................................................... 38

Anchor chain is stuck in anchor locker .................... 43

Anchor Chain Markings............................................ 37

Anchor is stuck ......................................................... 43

Anchor Rode Jams ................................................... 38

Anchor windlass will not turn .................................. 43

Anchoring ................................................................ 33

autopilot .................................................................. 30

Barbeque ................................................................. 17

bilge pumps ............................................................. 39

Charging the Batteries ............................................. 21

Chartplotter ............................................................. 31

clogged toilet ..................................................... 15, 44

Cooktop ................................................................... 17

Davit ......................................................................... 41

Emergency Procedures ............................................ 51

Engine Controls ........................................................ 26

Engine overheating .................................................. 42

Engine Start-Up ........................................................ 27

Engines..................................................................... 22

Entertainment System ............................................. 17

Freshwater does not flow at faucet ......................... 44

Fuel filter.................................................................. 42

Fuel Filters ............................................................... 24

Fuel Management .................................................... 28

Generators ............................................................... 20

Head Systems .......................................................... 15

Hitting a log ............................................................. 44

Hitting a rock ........................................................... 45

holding tank monitor ............................................... 16

Inverter .................................................................... 20

Launching the dingy ................................................. 41

Low battery .............................................................. 43

Maneuvering ........................................................... 32

Operating Checklists ................................................ 46

Outboard motor ...................................................... 42

Oven ........................................................................ 17

Radar........................................................................ 31

Rafting ..................................................................... 36

Refrigerators ............................................................ 17

Running into a fishing net ........................................ 45

salt water pump ....................................................... 39

Salt water pump ...................................................... 39

Shore Tie .................................................................. 35

Shorepower ............................................................. 20

SLOW VESSEL ........................................................... 26

sounder .............................................................. 30, 32

stabilizer system ...................................................... 40

switch fuel filters ..................................................... 25

Synchronizing Engine ............................................... 26

Thrusters .................................................................. 40

To clean the seawater strainer ................................ 42

To switch fuel filters ................................................ 42

Toilet will not flush .................................................. 44

toilets ....................................................................... 15

Troubleshooting ...................................................... 42

TV 17

VHF radios ................................................................ 30

Washer & Dryer ....................................................... 17

Windlass .................................................................. 38

windlass breaker ...................................................... 34