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Daily Global Rice E-Newsletter www.ricepluss.com www.riceplusmagazine.blogspot.com For information : Mujahid Ali mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com 0321 369 2874 1 www.ricepluss.com www.riceplusmagazine.blogspot.com Vol 7,Issue IV May 2 ,2016
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Jul 29, 2016

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  • Daily Global Rice E-Newsletter 2016

    www.ricepluss.com www.riceplusmagazine.blogspot.com For information : Mujahid Ali mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com 0321 369 2874

    1

    www.ricepluss.com www.riceplusmagazine.blogspot.com

    Vol 7,Issue IV May 2 ,2016

  • Daily Global Rice E-Newsletter 2016

    www.ricepluss.com www.riceplusmagazine.blogspot.com For information : Mujahid Ali mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com 0321 369 2874

    2

    Editorial Board Chief Editor

    Hamlik Managing Editor

    Abdul Sattar Shah

    Rahmat Ullah

    Rozeen Shaukat English Editor

    Maryam Editor

    Legal Advisor

    Advocate Zaheer Minhas

    Editorial Associates

    Admiral (R) Hamid Khalid

    Javed Islam Agha

    Ch.Hamid Malhi

    Dr.Akhtar Hussain

    Dr.Fayyaz Ahmad Siddiqui

    Dr.Abdul Rasheed (UAF)

    Islam Akhtar Khan Editorial Advisory Board

    Dr.Malik Mohammad Hashim Assistant Professor, Gomal University DIK

    Dr.Hasina Gul Assistant Director, Agriculture KPK

    Dr.Hidayat Ullah Assistant Professor, University of Swabi

    Dr.Abdul Basir Assistant Professor, University of Swabi

    Zahid Mehmood PSO,NIFA Peshawar

    Falak Naz Shah Head Food Science & Technology ART, Peshawar

    Today Rice News Headlines...

    Asias top rice producers under pressure as drought hurts crop to

    increase food security fears

    As Asias rice crop shrivels, food security fears resurface

    Cambodian Rice Quotes ( Updated 25-02 April/May 2016 )

    Shirley Spear's three-salmon kedgeree

    EATING RICE MAY BE HARMFUL FOR YOUR KIDS: STUDY

    Wheat, rice basmati fall on reduced offtake

    What to do with agriculture in 2016 and beyond

    Focusing on local demand gives more business

    SKUAST-K to revive rice variety Zag in Tangdhar

    Thailand takes world's top rice exporter crown in Q1

    Seized Containers Belong to Westco, Not UCI, Rice Importer

    Clarifies

    VIETNAM, INDIA RICE SELLERS INCREASE SOME OF THEIR

    QUOTES TODAY OTHER ASIA RICE QUOTES UNCHANGED

    APEDA AgriExchange Newsletter - Volume 1463

    News Detail...

    Asias top rice producers under pressure as drought hurts crop to increase food

    security fears

    PUBLISHED : Monday, 02 May, 2016, 2:28pm

    UPDATED : Monday, 02 May, 2016, 3:51pm

    Nearly a decade after a spike in global food prices sent shock waves around

    the world, Asias top rice producers are suffering from a blistering drought that threatens to cut output and boost prices of a staple for half the worlds population.World rice production is expected to decline for the first time this

    year since 2010, as failing rains linked to an El Nino weather pattern cut crop

    yields in Asias rice bowl.

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    3

    PrintEmail A heat wave is sweeping top rice exporter India, while the number two supplier Thailand is

    facing a second year of drought. Swathes of farmland in Vietnam, the third-biggest supplier, are

    also parched as irrigation fed by the Mekong river runs dry.

    The three account for more than 60 per cent of the global rice trade of about 43 million tonnes.

    As of now we havent seen a large price reaction to hot and dry weather because we have had

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    4

    such significant surplus stocks in India and Thailand. But that cant last forever, said James Fell, an economist at the International Grains Council.

    Rice inventories in the three top exporters are set to fall by about a third at the end of 2016 to 19

    million tonnes, the biggest year-on-year drop since 2003, according to Reuters calculations based

    on US Department of Agriculture data.Any big supply disruption can be extremely sensitive. In

    2008, lower Asian rice output due to an El Nino prompted India to ban exports, sending global

    prices sky-rocketing and causing food riots in Haiti and panic measures in big importers such as

    the Philippines.

    As of now we havent seen a large price reaction to hot and dry weather because we have had such significant surplus stocks in India and Thailand. But that cant last forever JAMES FELL, ECONOMIST AT THE INTERNATIONAL GRAINS COUNCIL

    Manila at the time scrambled to crack down on hoarding, ordered troops to supervise subsidised

    rice sales and asked fast food chains to serve half-portions, as well as urging Vietnam and others

    to sell the country more rice.The world has suffered a series of food crises over the past decade

    involving a range of grains due to adverse weather.In the case of rice, benchmark Thai prices hit

    a record around US$1,000 a tonne in 2008. Price spikes like this typically also boost demand for

    other grains such as wheat, widely used for noodles in Asia, and soybeans and corn used for food

    or feed.While currently far below 2008 highs, rice earlier this month hit US$389.50, the

    strongest since July and up 13 per cent from an eight-year low of US$344 in September.

    Bruce Tolentino of the Philippines-based International Rice Research Institute is concerned

    about Asias vulnerability.In general prices are still stable right now. Theyre inching up though, and what will drive things over the edge will be a major calamity in one of the major

    producing countries.Although Indias rice output in 2015 was largely stable, extremely hot temperatures are threatening a second crop in eastern regions.Traders see further price gains by

    June as Indias next big crop is not due until September and Thailands main crop by year end.

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    5

    The IGC sees a 2016 world harvest of 473 million tonnes, down from 479 million tonnes in 2015

    and the first decline in six years.

    Thailands last main crop was only about half of the peak production a few years ago and the USDA has forecast output will drop by more than a fifth to 15.8 million tonnes this year.The government has been asking farmers not to plant rice as there is little water in the reservoirs after

    two years of drought, said one Bangkok-based trader.In Vietnam, output could fall 1.5 per cent this year to 44.5 million tonnes, while exports would be 8.7 million tonnes, steady on a previous

    projection, the government said.As much as 240,000 hectares of paddy have been destroyed by

    drought and salination in the central area and southern Mekong Delta region, it said.A

    Singapore-based trader said that while the annual decline appeared modest Vietnams latest harvest is 5 to 6 per cent lower than last year.

    Thailand and Vietnam harvest three crops a year.Some Asian countries are already looking to raise imports.Indonesia is expected to see 2016 purchases jump by more than 60 per cent to two

    million tonnes from a few years ago.China, the worlds top importer, taking about 5 million tonnes annually, is expected to continue this buying pace. IGC has forecast Chinas 2016 production will fall short of consumption for a third consecutive year.The Philippines had the

    lowest stocks since October in March despite importing 750,000 tonnes and its procurement

    agency has standby authority to ship an additional 500,000 tonnes.Although El Nino has entered its weakening stage, the risk of higher food prices remains given the onset of the summer

    season, said Philippine Economic Planning Secretary Emmanuel Esguerra

    http://www.scmp.com/news/asia/article/1940487/asias-top-rice-producers-under-pressure-

    drought-hurts-crop-increases-food

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    6

    As Asias rice crop shrivels, food security fears resurface

    A farmer walking at his drought-hit rice field in Nonthaburi province outside Bangkok. Photo: AFP

    PUBLISHED: 7:21 AM, MAY 2, 2016

    SINGAPORE Nearly a decade after a spike in global food prices sent shockwaves around the world, Asias top rice producers are suffering from a blistering drought that threatens to cut output and boost prices of a staple for half the worlds population.World rice production is expected to decline for the first time this year since 2010, as failing rains linked to an El Nino

    weather pattern cut crop yields in Asias rice bowl.A heat wave is sweeping top rice exporter India, while the No 2 supplier Thailand is facing a second year of drought. Swathes of farmland

    in Vietnam, the third-biggest supplier, are also parched as irrigation fed by the Mekong river

    runs dry.The three account for more than 60 per cent of the global rice trade of about 43 million

    tonnes.As of now we havent seen a large price reaction to hot and dry weather because we have had such significant surplus stocks in India and Thailand. But that cant last forever, said Mr James Fell, an economist at the International Grains Council (IGC).

    Rice inventories in the three top exporters are set to fall by about a third at the end of 2016 to 19

    million tonnes, the biggest year-on-year drop since 2003, according to Reuters calculations based

    on US Department of Agriculture data.Any big supply disruption can be extremely sensitive. In

    2008, lower Asian rice output due to an El Nino prompted India to ban exports, sending global

    prices sky-rocketing and causing food riots in Haiti and panic measures in big importers such as

    the Philippines.Manila at the time scrambled to crack down on hoarding, ordered troops to

    supervise subsidised rice sales and asked fast food chains to serve half-portions, as well as urging

  • Daily Global Rice E-Newsletter 2016

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    7

    Vietnam and others to sell the country more rice.The world has suffered a series of food crises

    over the past decade involving a range of grains due to adverse weather.In the case of rice,

    benchmark Thai prices hit a record around US$1,000 (S$1,344) a tonne in 2008. Price spikes like

    this typically also boost demand for other grains such as wheat, widely used for noodles in Asia,

    and soybeans and corn used for food or feed.While currently far below 2008 highs, rice earlier

    this month hit US$389.50, the strongest since July and up 13 per cent from an eight-year low of

    US$344 in September.

    FIRST FALL IN WORLD CROP SEEN FOR 6 YEARS

    Mr Bruce Tolentino of the Philippines-based International Rice Research Institute is concerned

    about Asias vulnerability.In general prices are still stable right now. Theyre inching up though, and what will drive things over the edge will be a major calamity in one of the major

    producing countries.Although Indias rice output in 2015 was largely stable, extremely hot temperatures are threatening a second crop in eastern regions.Traders see further price gains by

    June as Indias next big crop is not due until September and Thailands main crop by year end.The IGC sees a 2016 world harvest of 473 million tonnes, down from 479 million tonnes in

    2015 and the first decline in six years.

    MEKONG DELTA

    Thailands last main crop was only about half of the peak production a few years ago and the USDA has forecast output will drop by more than a fifth to 15.8 million tonnes this year.The government has been asking farmers not to plant rice as there is little water in the reservoirs after

    two years of drought, said one Bangkok-based trader.In Vietnam, output could fall 1.5 per cent this year to 44.5 million tonnes, while exports would be 8.7 million tonnes, steady on a previous

    projection, the government said.As much as 240,000 hectares of paddy have been destroyed by

    drought and salination in the central area and southern Mekong Delta region, it said.A

    Singapore-based trader said that while the annual decline appeared modest Vietnams latest harvest is 5 to 6 per cent lower than last year.Thailand and Vietnam harvest three crops a year.

    IMPORTERS ALSO SUFFER

    Some Asian countries are already looking to raise imports.

    Indonesia is expected to see 2016 purchases jump by more than 60 per cent to two million tonnes

    from a few years ago.China, the worlds top importer, taking about 5 million tonnes annually, is expected to continue this buying pace. IGC has forecast Chinas 2016 production will fall short of consumption for a third consecutive year.The Philippines had the lowest stocks since October

    in March despite importing 750,000 tonnes and its procurement agency has standby authority to

    ship an additional 500,000 tonnes.Although El Nino has entered its weakening stage, the risk of higher food prices remains given the onset of the summer season, said Philippine Economic Planning Secretary Emmanuel Esguerra. REUTERS

    http://www.todayonline.com/world/asia/asias-rice-crop-shrivels-food-security-fears-resurface

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    8

    Cambodian Rice Quotes ( Updated 25-02 April/May 2016 )

    Variety

    &

    Percentage

    Premium

    Jasmine

    Rice

    (Rumduol)

    Purity

    >

    90%

    Wet

    Season

    Jasmine

    Rice

    (Rumduol)

    Purity

    >

    85%

    Wet

    Season

    Fragrant

    Rice

    (Sen Kra

    Ob)

    >

    85%

    Dry

    Season

    Long

    Grain

    White

    Rice IR

    5% 775 760 685 455

    10% 770 755 .... 450

    25% .... .... .... 435

    A1 Extra

    Super .... .... .... ....

    A1 Super .... .... .... ....

    FOB Term US$/Ton Phnom Penh or Sihanouk Ville Port (Min 10 Container)

    http://mekongoryza.com/en/ricenews/rice-news/49/asia-rice-quotes-unchanged-today.html

    Shirley Spear's three-salmon kedgeree

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    Shirley Spear's kedgeree

    PEAT smoke is evocative of everything Hebridean. The smell of smouldering peats on a still,

    dusky evening in Skye, will forever be a part of me.When Eddie and I first arrived at The Three

    Chimneys, we had the winter ahead of us to source local supply lines and develop our first menu.

    It was a daunting task. The Highlands and Islands Development Board (as it was known back in

    1984) had produced a booklet highlighting a number of excellent food producers and suppliers.

    This became my Bible. From its pages I found Andy Race, our fish merchant in Mallaig, who

    was to become a friend as well as a font of fishing knowledge. I was also interested in a small,

    one-man company in Uist that was listed as peat smoking and hand-slicing wild salmon. I

    phoned him and he agreed to send me a sample, which duly arrived in the post late on the

    following Saturday afternoon at the end of a short, dark January day.

    We used the restaurant as our sitting room in those early years, affording ourselves more space

    and a roaring fireside during the months when the business was closed to the public. When I cut

    open the pack, the peaty aroma from the smoked salmon was a heady experience. I prepared a

    plate of thin slices of freshly-baked wholemeal bread, lightly buttered, with the peat smoked

    salmon laid atop, seasoned with freshly ground black pepper and fresh lemon juice. Nothing

    more. We all relished our first taste. It was a winner.

    Sadly, smoking wild salmon became prohibitively expensive a few years later, but by this time,

    farmed salmon was more widely used. Andy Race always smoked his own products, including

    traditional kippers. I asked him if he would use peat in his smoke mixture and he did with great

    results, still selling widely today.The Salmon Kedgeree originated as a means of using up the

    off-cuts and tail end of the huge, wild fish I regularly prepped for the restaurant. It is a dish

    (more commonly made with curry spiced smoked haddock) associated with the groaning

    sideboards of Victorian shooting lodges, laden with help-yourself breakfast dishes keeping hot

    under silver cloches.

    But wild salmon, like oysters, was also considered poor mans food in the olden days, sold widely in our city pubs and alehouses. A kind of salmon hash called Tweed Kettle, made with

    potatoes and flaked salmon, was the equivalent of todays pub grub.My Three-Salmon Kedgeree was a great favourite in the restaurant at lunchtime. The smoked products lend a light, spicy

    flavour, an alternative to the curry. When we opened The House Over-By, this dish became a

    breakfast special, but it also makes a great family brunch or supper dish.

    Three-salmon kedgeree

    Serves 4/6

    To poach the salmon

    450g fresh Scottish salmon fillet

    4 slices of lemon

    2 slices of onion, separated into rings

    2 bay leaves

    A few sprigs of parsley with stalks

    A sprig of fresh fennel or dill with stalks (optional)

    8 white peppercorns

    Pinch of sea salt

    lemon, juice only

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    10fl oz dry white wine

    10fl oz water

    Method

    1. Place all ingredients except the salmon into a shallow saut pan or wide saucepan deep enough

    to take the piece of fish. Lay the salmon in the poaching liquid, which should reach about

    halfway up the pan, almost covering the fish. Place on a low heat and allow the liquid to come to

    simmering point. Cover with a lid, or a piece of close-fitting foil, and cook gently over a low

    heat for three minutes. Yurn off the heat and leave to cool with the lid or foil in place.

    2. When cool, remove the fish and strain the cooking liquor through a sieve, into a bowl. Discard

    the ingredients in the sieve. Before pouring the poaching liquor into a measuring jug, first

    measure Basmati rice in the jug, up to the level of 10fl oz. Pour the rice into a sieve and rinse it

    under cold running water until the water runs clear and set aside to drain. After measuring the

    rice, pour the poaching liquor into the jug. You will need 20fl oz of liquid to cook the rice. If

    short on quantity, make it up to the correct amount with some cold water.

    To cook the rice and complete the dish

    Basmati rice, measured and washed as above

    1 medium onion, finely chopped

    50g Scottish butter, preferably unsalted

    Finely grated zest of 1 large lemon (juice of half can be used in the poaching liquor above)

    4 cardamoms, gently crushed with the blade of knife

    Sea salt flakes

    3 large eggs, hard boiled, cooled and chopped

    4 spring onions, sliced

    125g hot-smoked salmon

    125g peat-smoked salmon (or any well-flavoured smoked salmon)

    2 heaped tbsp mixed chopped chives, parsley, and herbs such as dill, fennel, chervil, etc.

    A little butter and fresh single cream for serving

    Method

    1. Melt the butter in a medium-size, thick-bottomed, lidded saucepan. Add chopped onion and

    allow to cook for a few minutes. Add the washed rice, crushed cardamoms, lemon zest and a

    good pinch of sea salt. Stir well and pour in the poaching liquor. Bring to the boil and

    immediately cover with the close-fitting lid, or a layer of foil plus the lid. Turn the heat down

    very low for exactly 15 minutes then turn the heat off, but do not remove lid for at least a further

    10 minutes.

    2. While the rice is cooking, discard any skin and flake the poached salmon into a large mixing

    bowl. Add the finely chopped hard-boiled eggs, spring onions, flaked hot-smoked salmon and

    peat-smoked salmon cut into small pieces.

    3. Once the rice is cooked, remove the cardamoms and add it to the salmon mixture. Fold

    ingredients together well with a large metal spoon. Just before serving, stir in the fresh herbs and

    check seasoning. The whole dish can be cooled completely and stored in an airtight container in

    the refrigerator at this stage. Individual portions can be reheated, but never reheat rice more than

    once.

    4. To serve, add a small knob of butter and a tablespoonful of cream per person and reheat

    slowly and thoroughly over a low heat. Alternatively, this dish reheats per portion in a

    microwave very successfully. Serve piping hot with wedge of lemon and additional hard-boiled

    eggs quartered as a garnish if liked.

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    11

    EATING RICE MAY BE HARMFUL FOR YOUR KIDS: STUDY

    APR 27, 2016HEALTH, LIFESTYLE

    Parents, take note! Infants who eat rice and rice products typical first foods for babies may have higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who do not, a new US study has

    warned.Arsenic exposure from rice is a concern for infants and children, researchers

    said. Previous research suggests that arsenic exposure in utero and early in life may be associated with adverse effects on foetal growth and child immune and neurodevelopment

    outcomes.Infant rice cereal may contain inorganic arsenic concentrations that exceed the

    recommendation from the World Health Organisation (WHO) of 200 nanogram/gram (ng/g) for

    polished white rice and the new European Union regulations of 100 ng/g for products aimed at

    infants.Researchers from Dartmouth College in the US examined the frequency with which

    infants ate rice and rice-containing products in their first year of life, as well as the association

    with arsenic concentrations in the urine.

    The study included 759 infants born to mothers in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study from

    2011 to 2014. The infants were followed up with phone interviews every four months until 12

    months of age.At 12 months, dietary patterns during the past week were assessed, including

    whether the infant had eaten rice cereal, white or brown rice or foods either made with rice such as rice-based snacks or sweetened with brown rice syrup such as some brands of cereal bars. Infant urine samples were collected beginning in 2013 along with a 3-day food

    diary.Researchers found that 80 per cent of the 759 infants were introduced to rice cereal in the

    first year of life with most (64 per cent) starting at 4 to 6 months of age. At 12 months, 43 per

    cent reported eating some type of rice product in the past week; 13 per cent ate white rice and 10

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    12

    per cent ate brown rice at an average of one to two servings per week. About 24 per cent of

    infants ate food made with rice or sweetened rice syrup in the past week at an average of five to

    six servings per week. Based on information recorded in food diaries two days before urine

    sample collection, 71 infants (55 per cent) consumed some type of rice product in the prior two

    days.

    Results indicated that arsenic concentrations were higher among infants who ate rice or foods mixed with rice compared with infants who ate no rice. Also, total urinary arsenic concentrations were twice as high among infants who ate white or brown rice compared with

    those who ate no rice. The highest urinary arsenic concentrations were seen among infants who

    ate baby rice cereal. It was nearly double for those who ate rice snacks compared with those who

    ate no rice.

    The study was published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics http://www.newsmedialive.com/eating-rice-may-be-harmful-for-your-kids-study/

    Wheat, rice basmati fall on reduced offtake By PTI | 30 Apr, 2016, 04.21PM IST

    NEW DELHI: Wheat and rice basmati prices eased by up to Rs 100 at the wholesale grains

    market today due to reduced offtake against adequate stocks position on increased supplies from

    producing regions. However, barley advanced by on rising demand from consuming industries.

    Traders said adequate stocks position on the back of increased supplies from producing regions

    against reduced offtake by flour mills kept pressure on wheat prices. They said muted demand

    from retailers against sufficient stocks helped rice basmati prices to trade lower.

    In the national capital, wheat dara (for mills) shed anotherRs 5 to Rs 1,620-1,625 per quintal.

    Atta chakki delivery followed suit and enquired lower by a similar margin to Rs 1,625-1,630 per

    90 kg.

    In the rice section, rice basmati common and Pusa-1121 variety also slipped to Rs 5,700-5,800

    and Rs 4,600-5,500 against last close of Rs 5,800-5,900 and Rs 4,600-5,600 per quintal

    respectively.

    On the other hand, other bold grains like barley rose by Rs 40 to Rs 1,580-1,585 per quintal.

    Following are today's quotations (in Rs per quintal):

    Wheat MP (desi) Rs 1,850-2,100, Wheat dara (for mills) Rs 1,620-1,625, Chakki atta (delivery)

    Rs 1,625-1,630, Atta Rajdhani (10 kg) Rs 265, Shakti Bhog (10 kg) Rs 265, Roller flour mill Rs

    850-860 (50 kg), Maida Rs 930-950 (50 kg) and Sooji Rs 980-990 (50 kg).

    Basmati rice (Lal Quila) Rs 10,700, Shri Lal Mahal Rs 11,300, Super Basmati Rice Rs 9,700,

    Basmati common new Rs 5,700-5,800, Rice Pusa (1121) Rs 4,600-5,500, Permal raw Rs 1,900-

    1,950, Permal wand Rs 2,075-2,125, Sela Rs 2,400-2,500 and Rice IR-8 Rs 1,775-1,800, Bajra

    Rs 1,600-1,605, Jowar yellow Rs 1,800-1,900, white Rs 3,400-3,500, Maize Rs 1,375-1,385,

    Barley Rs 1,580-1,585.

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    13

    What to do with agriculture in 2016 and beyond by Dr. Emil Javier

    April 30, 2016

    Control of Pests and Diseases

    After availability of water, good seeds and fertilizers, come the need to protect crops from pests

    and diseases to raise yields, minimize losses and produce quality products.

    Majority of the pests are insects but rodents, birds and snails are also very damaging to crops in

    certain locations and at certain times of the year. Pathogens include bacteria, fungi and viruses as

    well as nematodes (very tiny worms infesting roots).

    The first line of defense is planting of species/varieties best for local growing conditions and

    with natural resistance/tolerance to prevalent pests and diseases. Next are quarantine and

    sanitation .i.e. removal and burning of diseased materials.

    Pests and diseases are also contained by mechanical/physical measures like handpicking, use of

    barriers, insect traps and tillage.

    Chemical control with synthetic chemicals and botanical preparations is common, standard

    practice when resistant varieties are not available and when the usual, cultural practices do not

    provide adequate control.

    And finally biological control with mass rearing and release of natural agents like wasps,

    lacewings and earwigs which prey on insects. Likewise, deployment of certain bacteria, fungi

    and viruses which are pathogenic to insects like Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). These beneficial

    microorganisms can also be used to control soil-borne pathogens.

    Included among the techniques for biological control is the deployment of male sterile insects

    made impotent by irradiation or by use of molecular biology procedures. The sterile males

    significantly reduce reproduction rate of target pests and serves as a form of birth control.

    Integrated Pest Management

    With the advent of potent and relatively inexpressive and easy to apply chemicals, farmers the

    world over including our own, have become addicted to massive, indiscriminate use of chemical

    pesticides until their long-term unwanted consequences on the health of humans and on the

    environment became apparent with the publication of Rachel Carsons book Silent Spring.

    Since then the standards for maximum permissible levels of pesticide residues became

    progressively strict (recent example of the rejection of Philippine banana exports to China). The

    chemicals classified as highly hazardous (Category I and II in The World Health Organization

    [WHO] classification system) have been banned worldwide. They are being replaced by

    Category III and IV pesticides, still hazardous nevertheless relatively benign.

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    14

    The world has moved on from the automatic, mindless use of chemical pesticides into the new

    paradigm of Integrated Pest Management (IPM). A better understanding of the ecology of insects

    have shown that the objective of pest control had to be the establishment of acceptable pest

    levels below which interventions are not called for. That the emphasis ought to be on control, not

    eradication because not only is eradication expensive but also unsafe. Allowing a pest population

    to survive at a reasonable threshold reduces selection pressure and prevents build up of resistant

    pest populations.

    We had been a beneficiary of this global paradigm shift towards 1p.m. The brown plant hopper is

    a very serious pest of rice. Entomologists from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI),

    University of the Philippines Los Baos (UPLB), the Philippine Rice Research Institute

    (PhilRice) and their counterparts in the national research organizations in Asia, have found out

    that withholding chemical sprays during the first 40 days of the rice crop allowed the spiders,

    wasps and dragon flies which prey on the brown leafhoppers to build up and provide effective

    control of the brown leafhoppers which appear late in the season. This observation led to a

    massive drop in application of chemicals in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam as well as among rice

    farmers in Indonesia and the Philippines.

    More Science Needed

    IPM as a broad-based approach for economically controlling pests and diseases without

    compromising human health and sustainability of the environment is a continuing challenge. The

    preferred methods are breeding for resistance and deployment of biological control agents.

    However, unlike synthetic chemicals which we just import, we cannot rely very much on other

    countries for our technology requirements for plant breeding and biological control. The species

    and strains of insects and pathogens affecting crops are by and large unique to geographic

    locations. The methodologies may be similar but we still have to work out the details ourselves.

    The recent outbreak of cocolisap in the coconut farms in Batangas, Laguna and Quezon

    illustrates the complexity and magnitude of the challenge. Since no other countries were affected

    except us there was nobody we can turn to.

    Our first problem was species identification. Was this scale insect a native species or an alien

    one which somehow eluded our quarantine? Since the local species Aspidiotus destructor is a

    minor pest and disappears during the rainy season, it was below the radar of our insect

    taxonomists. It took them a while to find out that we are dealing with a second species,

    Aspidiotus rigidus.

    In the meantime, there was a huge debate in social media between organic farming advocates and

    the Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA) on what pesticides to use to contain the pest outbreak.

    The organic farming advocates preferred use of horticultural oils which have a contact mode of

    action and non-toxic. They vehemently opposed the use of the new class of relatively benign

    pesticides called neonicotinoids.

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    Since the target insects adhere closely to the underneath parts of the leaf, contact pesticides like

    horticultural oils could not get to them. Worse, it was difficult to spray the coconut trees which

    are tall and most of which are located in far, inaccessible areas. Thus, PCA went ahead with the

    neonicotinoids chemicals which were easier to administer and more effective because of their

    systemic mode of action.

    Mario Navasero and his colleagues at the National Crop Protection Center (NCPC) at UPLB had

    to scramble and survey the devastated coconut plantations in Batangas, Laguna and Quezon in

    search of naturally-occurring predators of cocolisap. They found a candidate species, a wasp of

    the order Hymenoptera, but there was much still to be done. They had to study the biology of the

    candidate biological agent, its cycle and most importantly how it can be commercially mass

    produced in the laboratory, what kind of culture medium to use and how best to deploy the

    predator in the field.

    Fortunately, nature came to our rescue in the guise of Typhoon Glenda which ripped across

    Southern Luzon. Typhoon Glenda must have blown the cocolisap away and the affected

    coconuts in Batangas, Laguna and Quezon miraculously recovered.

    Network of Crop Protection Centers

    In the late 70s, at the time of Department of Agriculture (DA) Secretary Arturo Tanco, Domingo

    Panganiban, the lead implementor of the Masagana 99 rice program and entomologist Fernando

    Sanchez, Sr. conceived of a network of regional crop protection centers in the Bureau of Plant

    Industry (BPI) with its national headquarters at UPLB.

    These centers were adequately staffed with well-trained entomologists, plant pathologists, weed

    scientists and ecologists. The centers had well-equipped laboratories with generous bilateral

    support from US, Germany and Australia.

    Unfortunately, these agencies are now shells of their original status due to lack of support and

    neglect. Their research staff have been decimated by the rationalization program imposed on the

    DA and its agencies.

    The cocolisap mini-tragedy should be warning enough. We may not be as lucky next time.

    Use of chemical pesticides ought to be only a last resort whenever everything else fails in the

    control of pests and diseases. However, modern plant breeding and development of biocontrol

    agents are highly knowledge intensive and very location-specific. We must possess the capacity

    to develop these technologies on our own.

    Part of the agenda for agriculture for 2016 and beyond should be the massive rehabilitation of the

    NCPC at UPLB, the regional crop protection centers of the BPI and the entomology and plant

    pathology academic departments of the regional state colleges and universities (SCUs).

    ***

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    16

    Dr. Emil Q. Javier is a Member of the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST)

    and also Chair of the Coalition for Agriculture Modernization in the Philippines (CAMP). For

    any feedback, email eqjavier@yahoo.com

    http://www.mb.com.ph/what-to-do-with-agriculture-in-2016-and-beyond-

    6/#qj28EkLolvfwX3QX.99http://www.mb.com.ph/what-to-do-with-agriculture-in-2016-and-beyond-6/

    Focusing on local demand gives more business

    By Mansoor Ahmad

    April 28, 2016

    LAHORE: Domestic commerce is steadily growing in the country as even the large exporters

    have realised that they cannot survive any global downturn if they do not have a solid base for

    their products in the domestic market.

    The thrust towards domestic market has also increased because young consumers are the

    dominant force. Retail is a buzz word these days and it is not limited to groceries. Walk-in

    customers are being served even at private hospitals and private schools, as the government

    services in these fields continue to deteriorate.

    Pakistans economy has come a long way from licensed based imports when the license holders used to make tons of money. Exports were then seen as the best business to make money. This

    period lasted for a longer period because the rupee was regularly devalued to provide the

    exporters with guaranteed profits against their investments. After every three consignments, the

    exporters used to get higher returns for the goods as the rupee value used to be higher at the time

    of shipment and lower when the export proceeds were received.

    Retailing first started in education when hundreds of private schools, colleges and universities

    were established by the private sector to fill the vacuum created by the inept public education

    system. The healthcare services too were soon dominated by the private sector as government

    health services were pathetic. The housing societies were the next to erupt as the state had no

    answer to the ever growing housing needs of the population.

    Among the manufacturing sectors home appliances started slowly replacing the imported

    appliances. Two decades back, the refrigerators, colour television, and air conditioners market

    was dominated by imports. Today, the top three brands in each of these categories are produced

    in Pakistan along with fully automatic washing machines, microwave ovens and other electronic

    gadgets.

    Textiles, rice, and leather that comprised the bulk of our exports however remained focused on

    foreign markets. Rice manufacturers were the first among exporters to recognise the importance

    of the domestic market and successfully introduced their basmati rice brands a decade back.

    They now have a lucrative domestic market for their products. Some leather exporters introduced

    their branded products in the domestic market but received lukewarm response.

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    17

    The share of textiles in the domestic market was less than 15 percent about five years back.

    Textiles however remained the mainstay of our exports commanding a share of 65-55 percent in

    the total exports of the country. Whenever global textiles came under pressure, the textile

    industry in Pakistan suffered more heavily because of its dependence on exports. Currently the

    entire ladies fabric and apparel market of Pakistan is designed and produced here.

    Breeze was the first Pakistani brand of fabric and apparel that made its mark in the domestic

    market and then in exports. Its products were retailed at company retail stores. This model was

    replicated in foreign countries. Thus, this brand was first established in Pakistan before venturing

    into exports. Khadi has emerged the most popular brand in Pakistan.

    Fabric designing played a major role in the popularity of Pakistani ladies fabric that according to

    some estimates has sales in the vicinity of Rs400 billion per annum and increasing. Khadija

    Shah, the daughter of former federal Finance Minister Salman Shah is the most celebrated fabric

    and apparel designer of the country.

    The country boosts of over 150 most talented fabric and apparel designer that remain engaged

    throughout the year to produce innovative designs for scores of brands.

    In the last two years, the largest business houses of the country have established hundreds of

    retail outlets of their brands. You can find retail outlets in every major market of the country

    from Gul Ahmad, Nishat Group, Al Karam, Sapphire, and Din Textiles. Most of them have

    opened dozens of retail outlets in Dubai, Saudi Arabia, United Kingdom, Canada and the United

    States. Even individual brands like Junaid Jamshaid after success in Pakistan have opened retail

    outlets in UK, Canada and the US.

    The new retailers innovate ways to attract the new high-tech generation with appealing ads and

    innovative brand names.

    The name attracts the youngsters but it is the final product that matters for sustained sales and

    mouth publicity

    SKUAST-K to revive rice variety Zag in Tangdhar

    The traditional Zag variety (Lal Chawal) was losing its area in Tangdhar and was becoming extinct. On

    the directives of the Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Nazeer Ahmed an effort was initiated to revive the heritage

    rice variety ZAG rice in this area, the statement said.

    Srinagar, Publish Date: May 1 2016 12:44AM | Updated Date: May 1 2016 12:44AM

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    18

    Representational Pic

    In a welcome initiative, SKUAST-K has decided to revive the heritage rice variety Zag in Tangdhar

    in district Kupwara.

    In this regard, a university team led by Dr G A Parray, Associate Director Research, MRCFC,

    Khudwani, officers of agriculture department recently launched a 2-day Participatory Seed

    Production of High Yielding Varieties and Revival of Zag Rice of Kashmir Himalayas in

    Tangdhar, a statement here said.

    Raja Manzoor local MLA and large number of farmers of the area were present. An interface of the

    scientists-farmers was also held on the occasion.

    The traditional Zag variety (Lal Chawal) was losing its area in Tangdhar and was becoming extinct.

    On the directives of the Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Nazeer Ahmed an effort was initiated to revive the

    heritage rice variety ZAG rice in this area, the statement said.

    15q seed of high yielding varieties and pure seed of Zag were distributed among farmers for up-

    scaling the production. One compact block of 200 kanals of land in the Agriculture Zone Gabar of

    Tangdhar was brought under this participatory seed production programme, it said.

    Dr Parray speaking during the interface highlighted the role played by the university scientists

    towards rice research and in addressing the problems faced by farming community of the valley.

    http://www.greaterkashmir.com/news/business/skuast-k-to-revive-rice-variety-zag-in-

    tangdhar/216291.htmlhttp://www.greaterkashmir.com/news/business/skuast-k-to-revive-rice-variety-zag-

    in-tangdhar/216291.html

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    19

    http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/2016/may/01/muhith-against-duty-hike-rice-import

    Thailand takes world's top rice exporter crown in Q1

    29 Apr 2016 at 17:27

    WRITER: ONLINE REPORTERS

    - Thailand topped the list of the worlds biggest rice exporters in the first quarter, shipping 2.85 million

    tonnes of the grain, a 34% year-on-year increase.

    The Thai Rice Exporters Association said Friday that the 44 billion baht in rice exports marked a

    23% increase in value over the same period in 2015.

    By comparison, India shipped 2.3 million tonnes of rice from January-March while Vietnam

    exported 1.4 million tonnes, Pakistan 1.3 million tonnes and 820,000 tonnes by the United

    States.

    However, Vietnamese customs data released on Wednesday showed the world's No.3 rice

    exporter shipped 1.55 million tonnes. The country said it expects second-quarter exports to top

    1.6 million tonnes.

    India's export volume was estimated to have risen 2% in the quarter, while that of Vietnam rose

    by 58% and 4% by the US. Pakistan's export volume dropped 9%.

    In the first quarter, the five biggest buyers of Thai rice were Indonesia (317,100 tonnes, an 877%

    annual increase), Ivory Coast (272,354 tonnes, up 86%), Benin (266,246 tonnes, up 426%),

    China (257,708 tonnes, up 86%) and Cameroon (191,846 tonnes, up 251%).

    In March alone, the country exported 990,864 tonnes of rice worth 15.2 billion baht, rising 26%

    by volume and 17% by value year-on-year. In the month, exporters delivered white rice to

    governments in China, Indonesia and the Philippines and broken rice to African nations.

    The association estimated the rice export at 700,000-750,000 tonnes in April due to the Songkran

    holidays.

    Without government-to-government rice deals, rice sales in traditional markets did not increase

    much because the purchasing power of African countries remains low, the association said

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    20

    Seized Containers Belong to Westco, Not UCI, Rice

    Importer Clarifies

    Monrovia - The management of United Commodities Incorporated (UCI), a major rice importer

    in Liberia, says it has been wrongly accused by the Liberia Revenue Authority relating to some

    56 containers released to UCI without honouring the authoritys levies.The LRA in a statement last week charged that the containers entered Liberia, stored at APM Terminals and later released

    between January and March 2016 by the alleged perpetrators to UCI without the payment of

    customs and other revenues due Liberia.But UCI, in a statement responding to a FrontPageAfrica inquiry said the containers in question actually belonged to another company,

    Westco International Incorporated.

    We want to clarify that the containers in question do not belong to UCI but Westco, which is using our warehouses. The company says it has since settled all payments to LRA and all receipts given by LRA carry Westcos name. It is very unfortunate that someone is using this to tarnish UCI's image, the company statement noted.UCI says the LRA is demanding payment in levies from the corporation simply because Westco International Incorporate cleared the goods

    from the port and placed them in portion of our warehouse that has leased to the said Westco

    Incorporated.UCI says it has operated within Liberia from more than nine years without any duty

    related problems with Liberia Custom Service.

    UCI, because of her confidence in the Liberian economy has made huge investment within the Freeport of Liberia in excess of five million United States Dollars. Our corporation has no intent

    to carry out illegal activities that will jeopardize our investment in Liberia.According to UCI, Westco Incorporated sometime in December 2015 leased a portion of UCI warehouse to store

    some commodities such as vegetable products including oil.Regrettably, it now appears to us

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    21

    that Westco International Incorporated brought in 56 and placed them in the facility illegally by

    their failure to pay the customs duties, something we as a corporation frown upon.

    Nevertheless, UCI says it remains committed to maintaining a cordial relationship it has enjoyed

    over the years with the Ministry of Finance and has taken the position that it will work along

    with the LRA to ensure that Westco International pays the short payment amount as requested by

    the LRA.The company says it is resolved to do this in a bid to show good faith with the LRA and

    also establish the fact that whatever Westco International did was not sanctioned by UCI.UCI

    has since the incident called upon Westco International to immediately commence the payment

    of the amount requested by the LRA without delay as UCI strives to remain engaged with them

    until the full amount is paid to government revenue.

    http://frontpageafricaonline.com/index.php/business/612-seized-containers-belong-to-westco-

    not-uci-rice-importer-clarifies

    VIETNAM, INDIA RICE SELLERS INCREASE SOME

    OF THEIR QUOTES TODAY OTHER ASIA RICE

    QUOTES UNCHANGED

    4/29/2016

    ORYZA (29-04-2016)

    VIETNAM, INDIA RICE SELLERS INCREASE SOME OF THEIR QUOTES TODAY

    OTHER ASIA RICE QUOTES UNCHANGED

    Vietnam rice sellers increased their quotes for 100% broken rice by about $5 per ton to around

    $345 $355 per ton today. India rice sellers increased their quotes for parboiled rice by about $5

    per ton to around $345 $355 per ton.Other Asia rice sellers kept their quotes unchanged.

    5% Broken Rice

    Thailand 5% rice is indicated at around $380 $390 per ton, about $15 per ton premium on

    Vietnam 5% rice shown at around $365 $375 per ton.

    India 5% rice is indicated at around $365 $375 per ton, on par with Pakistan 5% rice shown at

    around $365 $375 per ton.

    25% Broken Rice

    Thailand 25% rice is indicated at around $365 $375 per ton, about $10 per ton premium on

    Vietnam 25% rice shown at around $355 $365 per ton.

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    22

    India 25% rice is indicated at around $335 $345 per ton, about $10 per ton premium on Pakistan

    25% rice shown at around $325 $335 per ton.

    Parboiled Rice

    Thailand parboiled rice is indicated at around $390 $400 per ton. India parboiled rice is indicated

    at around $345 $355 per ton, about $60 per ton discount to Pakistan parboiled rice last shown at

    around $405 $415 per ton.

    100% Broken Rice

    Thailand broken rice, A1 Super is indicated at around $340 $350 per ton, about $5 per ton

    discount to Vietnam 100% broken rice shown at around $345 $355 per ton. India's 100% broken

    rice is shown at around $280 $290 per ton, about $10 per ton discount to Pakistan broken

    sortexed rice shown at around $290 $300 per ton.

    APEDA AgriExchange Newsletter - Volume 1463

    International Benchmark Price

    Price on: 27-04-2016

    Product Benchmark Indicators Name Price

    Garlic

    1 Chinese first grade granules, CFR NW Europe (USD/t) 3500

    2 Chinese Grade A dehydrated flakes, CFR NW Europe (USD/t) 4500

    3 Chinese powdered, CFR NW Europe (USD/t) 3000

    Ginger

    1 Chinese sliced, CIF NW Europe (USD/t) 2150

    2 Chinese whole, CIF NW Europe (USD/t) 2300

    3 Indian Cochin, CIF NW Europe (USD/t) 2850

    Guar Gum Powder

    1 Indian 100 mesh 3500 cps, FOB Kandla (USD/t) 3700

    2 Indian 200 mesh 3500 cps basis, FOB Kandla (USD/t) 1100

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    23

    3 Indian 200 mesh 5000 cps, FOB Kandla (USD/t) 2220

    Source:agra-net For more info

    Market Watch

    Commodity-wise, Market-wise Daily Price on 30-04-2016

    Domestic Prices Unit Price : Rs per Qty

    Product Market Center Variety Min Price Max Price

    Rice

    1 Manjeri (Kerala) Other 2700 3700

    2 Deogarh (Orissa) Other 2000 3000

    3 Purulia (West Bengal) Other 2200 2220

    Wheat

    1 Manvi (Karnataka) Other 1625 1655

    2 Neemuch (Madhya Pradesh) Other 1550 1923

    3 Sangli (Maharashtra) Other 2000 2600

    Mousambi

    1 Thirurrangadi (Kerala) Other 3500 3700

    2 Sultanpur (Uttar Pradesh) Other 3900 3950

    3 Gohana (Haryana) Other 2000 2800

    Onion

    1 Bolangir (Orissa) Other 1500 1600

    2 Nabha (Punjab) Other 500 800

    3 Karad (Maharashtra) Other 600 900

    Source:agmarknet.nic.in For more info

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    24

    Egg Rs per 100 No

    Price on 30-04-2016

    Product Market Center Price

    1 Ahmedabad 331

    2 Chittoor 308

    3 Hyderabad 291

    Source: e2necc.com

    Other International Prices Unit Price : US$ per package

    Price on 27-04-2016

    Product Market Center Origin Variety Low High

    Onions Dry Package: 40 lb cartons

    1 Atlanta Georgia Yellow 20.50 22.50

    2 Chicago Mexico Yellow 21 25

    2 Detroit Peru Yellow 22 23

    Cabbage Package: 50 lb sacks

    1 Atlanta Florida Round Green Type 11 12

    2 Dallas Mexico Round Green Type 8.50 10.75

    3 Detroit Canada Round Green Type 14 14.50

    Grapefruit Package: 4/5 bushel cartons

    1 Atlanta Florida Red 21 21.50

    2 Chicago Florida Red 18.50 18.50

    3 Miami Florida Red 12 15

    Source:USDA