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Yearning for Yurts Montrose’s Daily Routines Adaptive Ski Programs Fall & Winter Hunting
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2011 Destination Montrose

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  • Yearning for Yurts Montroses Daily Routines Adaptive Ski Programs Fall & Winter Hunting

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 1

  • Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 2

  • 2580 N. Townsend Ave. Montrose, CO 81401 970-249-9664 www.flowermotor.com

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 3

  • Towering Majesty | L u A n n e Ty r r e l l

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 4

  • Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 5

  • SundayCommunion Services

    8 am Traditional9 am Sunday School

    for All Ages10 am ContemporaryFriday12:10 Noonday

    Communion

    Info: 970-249-2451www.allsaintsanglicanmontrose.org

    A Spirit-filled, Liturgical Church~

    Reaching out with theTransforming Love of Jesus Christ

    2057 S. Townsend Ave. Montrose - East of Taco Bell

    Locally Owned & Operated 30 Years Experience24/7 EMERGENCY SERVICE MON. - FRI. 8AM TO 5PM970-874-9100 743 1325 Rd, Delta, CO

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    MontroseDESTINATION

    features

    FALL / WINTER 2011

    6 Fun of all sortsis on tap at these events.Area Roundup 40 A guide to

    whats new and tasty.DINE Guide 51 DINE Guide Map

    With the Colorado Yurt Co. headquarterslocated in Montrose's backyard, many areabusinesses and residents have found thatyurts a circular dwelling made of fabric provide a comfortable and unique out-door experience in the mountains, evenduring colder months.

    Yearning for Yurts

    32Vacations are usually full of new, fun adven-tures, but they can also mean that the dailyroutines people become so accustomed to a morning workout or Sunday afternoon foot-ball game on television are left at home.That doesn't have to be the case when visitingMontrose, though it's all here, too.

    It's All Here in Montrose

    36

    10Each fall and winter, thousands of people attemptto take down big game throughout MontroseCounty, including elk, deer, black bear and moun-tain lions. Hunters' most popular targets are elkand deer, respectively, said Randy Hampton,spokesman for Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

    Fall and Winter Hunting

    Montrose Daily Press3684 N.Townsend, Montrose CO, 81401(970) 249-3444 www.montrosepress.com

    14Western Colorado is a popular destination forwinter sports enthusiasts. But these winter typesof activities have often been out of reach forpeople with physical disabilities. The challengeof developing "adaptive" programs has beenmet with great success and opportunities provid-ed by a number of western Colorado ski resorts.

    Adaptive Ski at Colorado Resorts

    18For Rebecca Dorr, the turning of the leaves fromgreen to gold and the reappearance of snow onthe surrounding peaks not only serve as a harbin-ger of fall and winter, they mean a markedincrease in business at the Homebrew Connection,the beer brewing supply store she operates withher husband Lenord and son Brandon.

    Knockin' Nut Brown

    24There's a vast world out there, one filled with sooth-ing dark, and startling shots of color. Unendingmajesty and knowledge waiting to be tapped. It'sa world John Pool explores every chance he gets, andit's easy for you to do it, too. Just look up.

    Seeing Stars

    26The Western Slope's majestic aspen forests are afavorite subject for photographers both profes-sional and amateur, particularly at the height oftheir fall color. But these trees are a source ofinspiration, beauty and comfort year round forlocal certified financial planner and overall ren-aissance man Bob Tesch.

    Ode to Aspens

    28Living on the Western Slope offers a number ofadvantages, particularly for outdoors enthusi-asts whose ideal winter consists of seeing snow,snow and more snow, as was the case last year.Early indications are that the winter of 2011-2012 is shaping up as an iffy proposition.

    Let it Snow or not

    "Snowmobiling gives you freedom,"Montrose retiree Bob Morris explained. "Youcan travel to places you could never see anyother way than by snow. And you're notcausing any damage or danger to the grass ortrail. You're not restricted to a path."

    SnowmobilingMontrose area offers prime territory

    16Like many high school graduates, JesseMcCombs believed joining the militaryoffered many opportunities to gain special-ized training and see the world. When hegraduated from Montrose High School in2001, he went straight into the Army.

    Thankful to be HomeLocal veteran recalls service with pride

    22

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    6 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 6

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    We Are Proud to Carry & Service the BEST Brands of Home Appliances & Electronics! 2180 East Main Street Montrose, CO 81401 (970) 240.9798 Family owned & operated Credit cards accepted Financing available

    In addition to appliances, we now carry cabinetry, light xtures, plumbing xtures, window coverings and ooring, including hardwood, tile, carpet, laminate and vinyl. See us for all your building or remodeling nishes.

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    FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 7

  • NOVEMBER

    DECEMBER

    JANUARY

    Dec. 3 The annual Parade of Lights takes place in downtown Montrose on Main Street at dusk.Call 249-5000 for more information.

    Dec. 7 Columbine Middle School Concert, 6 p.m.-9 pm. Montrose Pavilion. For more information,call 249-2581.

    Dec. 9 Christmas Jazz Concert featuring the North Fork Flyers at 7:30 p.m. at the Wright Opera House, 472 Main St. in Ouray. Call (970) 325-4399.

    Dec. 10 Wine, Chocolate and Cheese takes place at 7 p.m. at the Wright Opera House, 472 Main St. in Ouray. Call (970) 325-4399.

    Dec. 18 The Winter Swing Concert will be presented at 2 p.m. at the Wright Opera House, 472 Main St. in Ouray. Call (970) 325-4399.

    Jan. 5-8 The 16th annual Ouray Ice Festival will be held at the Ouray Ice Park in Ouray. The event is an international gathering of ice climbers, gear manufacturing exhibitors and ice climbingenthusiasts featuring clinics, competitions, slide shows and a children's climbing wall. For more information, call (970) 325-4288.

    Jan. 13 Magic Circle Players Theatre presents "Whose Life Is It Anyway?" at 420 S. 12th St. Call 249-7838 for ticket information or visit www.magiccircleplayers.com.

    Jan. 20 Blue Sky Music presents Jackie Green in concert at the Montrose Pavilion, 1800 Pavilion Drive, in a benefit for hospice and KVNF-FM radio. For ticket information, call 275-4183.

    MARCHMarch 9 Magic Circle Players Theatre presents "Dearly Departed" at 420 S. 12th St. Call 249-7838 for

    ticket information or visit www.magiccircleplayers.com.

    Nov. 4 Magic Circle Theatre presents "The Dixie Swim Club" Nov. 4-6, 11-13, 18-20 and 25-26 at420 S. 12th St. For tickets and show times, call 249-7838 or visit www.magiccircleplayers.com.

    Nov. 4-5 The Montrose Woman's Club presents its annual hobby and craft show, "Dressed in Holiday Style," at Friendship Hall, 1001 N. 2nd St. Free. Call 249-7510.

    Nov. 5: The Del-Rose Chorus presents "USO Barbershop Style: Taking It to the Troops," a USO-style show with a Bob Hope feel, featuring World War II-era music, skits, comedy and barber shoppers. Shows are at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at the Delta Christian Church. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors in advance or $12 and $10 at the door. For more information, call 209-1145.

    Nov. 12 Christmas Carol Luncheon and Fashion Show from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Ouray Community Center, 320 6th Ave. in Ouray. Call (970) 325-7065.

    Nov. 15 "MAX & RUBY," a stage version of the Nickelodeon Jr. television series, will be presented at4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. at the Sheridan Opera House, 110 N. Oak St. in Telluride. Tickets areavailable online at www.sheridanoperahouse.com.

    Nov. 24: Community Thanksgiving Dinner, call for time, Friendship Hall, 1001 N. 2nd St. Call 249-8884for more information.

    Nov. 25 Annual Christmas tree lighting at 5:30 p.m. in front of the Montrose County Courthouse, corner of First Street and Townsend Avenue, as well as the opening of Santa's Cabin at Centennial Plaza. Call 249-5000 for more information.

    8

    area events roundupGet ready to kick up your heels in Montrose and surrounding areas this fall and winter.Fun of all sorts is on tap at the following events:

    Note: When no phone number is given for a particular listing, call the Montrose Association of Commerce and Tourism at 249-5000 or checkwww.visitmontrose.com. This list is not intended to be comprehensive and relies on information available at press time.

    FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 8

  • Montrose Countyhas more than2,200 miles ofdiverse beauty.Come visit usand experience

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 9

  • 10 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    MONTROSE IS FAR FROM A TROPI-CAL PARADISE, but it is a winter won-derland for hunters.

    Each fall and winter, thousands ofpeople attempt to take down biggame throughout Montrose County,including elk, deer, black bear and

    mountain lions. Hunters' most populartargets are elk and deer, respectively,said Randy Hampton, spokesman forColorado Parks and Wildlife.

    Elk are by far Colorados mostpopular, and mule deer are the mostabundant, Hampton said.

    Colorado has six main hunting sea-sons. Archery and muzzle loader sea-sons concluded in September, whileelk and deer rifle seasons are continu-ing. Colorado offered its first rifle sea-son for elk only from Oct. 15-19, andthe second season for elk and deer

    Jim Hokit, an avid Montrose County hunter.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e r

    Fall Hunting:Popular and profitable in Montrose

    b y M a t t L i n d b e r g

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 10

  • The territory around Montrose features abundant wildlife, experts

    say, particularly the Uncompahgre Plateau, which is home

    to more than 20,000 deer.

    p h o t o b y L u A n n e Ty r r e l l

    only opened Oct. 22 and continues through Oct 30.Elk and deer seasons take place from Nov. 5-13 and Nov.

    16-20. Mountain lion hunting starts Nov. 22, but it is notnearly as popular in the state as elk and deer hunting,Hampton said, explaining that it is a pursuit suitable only formore experienced hunters.

    Although the economy has been in a slump for quite awhile, hunting is a booming business both locally and acrossthe state. Each year, more than 300,000 hunting licenses aresold in Colorado, Hampton said. He also said hunting andfishing accounts for $29 million in revenue for MontroseCounty each year.

    Its a big business thats very important to the local econ-omy, Hampton said.

    Thats because most out-of-town hunters typically stay inMontrose for at least a week and spend money on food, gasand equipment, he explained. He said a resident hunterspends an average of $106 per day, while a non-residentspends about $216 a day.

    Its dramatic the amount of money people will spend,he said

    Hunters have plenty of options when it comes to finding alocation where they can set up. It starts with theUncompahgre Plateau. The plateau is 20 miles west ofMontrose and is comprised of game management units 61and 62.

    The area boasts approximately 10,570 elk and 20,220deer, Hampton said.

    Jim Hokit, who has 42 years of hunting experience inMontrose and 58 total years of experience, said the plateau isa great place to go.

    It has rough and rigid terrain, Hokit said. What I loveis the level of the terrain. It also has plenty of elk and deer.

    But hunters beware getting a chance to hunt on theplateau isnt easy. Colorado offers a limited number of licens-es to hunt on the plateau per year, as the south side of it isconsidered a hot spot for hunters.

    Northeast of Montrose is Cimarron, which Hampton saidhas about 4,830 elk and 8,870 deer.

    There are plenty of other spots to hunt in and aroundMontrose, Hampton said, but the aforementioned locationsfeature some of the highest animal populations.

    Its one of the most incredible places to get out andhunt, Hampton said of the Montrose area. Its one of thoserare places that is virtually undisturbed when it comes tohunting opportunities.

    Hokit said he would encourage people to give hunting achance.

    Theres a lot of camaraderie and discipline, Hokit said.You have to discipline yourself and use it to your advan-tage.

    Colorado requires all hunters to take an education coursebefore they can obtain a license. For more information, visitMontroses Park and Wildlife office at 2300 S. Townsend Ave.,or call 252-6000.

    11FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 11

  • 12 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Mount Sneffels | J o e l B l o c k e r

    At 14,158 feet, Mount Sneffels is the highest peak in the area and a favorite

    destination for area hikers and climbers. Located in Ouray County, it serves

    as an easily identifiable landmark for residents of Ouray, Ridgway and

    Montrose as it rises above its neighboring peaks in the San Juans range.

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 12

  • We wish to extend a warm welcome topatients old & new. In our offices, youwill receive the best of dental care, with a

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    Valley ManorCare Center

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    13FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 13

  • 14 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    AdaptiveSki:Opportunities abound at Colorado resorts

    WESTERN COLORADO IS A POPU-LAR DESTINATION for winter sportsenthusiasts seeking pristine, packedpowder for skiing and snowboarding,miles of crosscountry ski trails, and iceclimbing venues.

    But these types of activities haveoften been out of reach for bothyoung people and adults with physi-cal disabilities. Over the past 30 years,the challenge of developing "adap-tive" programs has been met withgreat success and opportunities pro-vided by a number of westernColorado ski resorts.

    Three major resorts within a two-hour drive of Montrose offer a fullrange of snow sport options for the

    disabled: Telluride, Powderhorn andCrested Butte.

    All three areas feature adaptive skiprograms that operate as nonprofitorganizations with the goal ofimproving the quality of life of peoplewith disabilities through outdoorrecreation. Programs are led by pro-fessional instructors and trained vol-unteers.

    Located 68 miles southwest ofMontrose is the mining town turnedski resort of Telluride, famous for its

    powder-light "white gold." Last winter, the ski area's adaptive

    sports program, which has been inoperation for 13 years, initiated aWounded Warriors project for troopsinjured while serving in Iraq andAfghanistan. Telluride hopes toexpand the project this winter, provid-ing three week-long events for activeduty servicemen and women and vet-erans with disabilities.

    Specialized equipment includesthe mono-ski, bi-ski, dual-ski, three-

    Volunteer instructors Steve Wanovich and Bryan Wood help Army Spc. Alejandro Calvo as

    he navigates the deep powder at the top of Colorados Snowmass Mountain during

    the 25th National Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic, March 29, 2011D O D p h o t o b y D o n n a M i l e s

    b y E l a i n e H a l e J o n e s

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 14

  • That old, empty beast was costing us money on our

    electric bill, so we kicked itto the curb for recycling.Find out what you can doat TogetherWeSave.com.

    15FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    track and four-track skis, guiding for the blind andadaptations on skis or snowboards. On-snow volun-teers also accompany all sit-down skiers and thoseneeding additional assistance.

    Powderhorn Ski Resort, situated on the north-fac-ing slope of Grand Mesa between Montrose andGrand Junction, is home to Colorado Discover Ability.During the winter, the nonprofit organization, whichhas been serving people with disabilities since 1980,directs the adaptive snowsports center atPowderhorn.

    Amputees, those with spinal cord injuries, visualimpairments, head injuries, multiple sclerosis andother conditions have benefited from ski and snow-board lessons, fitness programs and even racingevents. Fun, safety and realistic skill development aresome of the goals of the Colorado Discover Abilityprogram.

    Another former mining town is Crested Butte,located 30 miles north of Gunnison and approxi-mately a two-hour drive from Montrose. TheAdaptive Sports Center of Crested Butte providesyear-round activities for people with disabilities andtheir families. Services are provided for individualswith cognitive-related disabilities such as Down syn-drome, autism, attention deficit disorder and atten-tion deficit hyperactive disorder, as well as at-risk-youth.

    In addition to skiing and snowboarding, the sportscenter also offers Nordic ski trips, ice climbing andback country skiing. The Crested Butte Center alsosends its professional staff to lead clinics and consul-tations throughout the United States, Europe andSouth America. It is also credited with helping startan adaptive sports program at several ski areas inArgentina.

    A large part of the success of adaptive sports pro-grams is the collaboration between the ski area andstudents from area schools. Starting with third-gradestudents, the Montrose-Olathe School District'sAdaptive Ski Program has taken advantage of spe-cially trained instructors and volunteers, specializedequipment and numerous props and methods.

    Props include the use of bamboo poles to aid stu-dents in maintaining balance and turning while slid-ing down a slope; rigid hoops, a.k.a. a wheelchairpush rim, which connect the instructor and studentwithout being hands on and tethers made of web-bing straps attached to the student's hips or snow-board that help create edging and pressure forcesindependent of the instructor.

    "It (the adaptive ski program) gives young peoplewith disabilities a great sense of freedom in the out-doors," said Aileen Tobler, adapted PE specialist forthe Montrose County School District.

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 15

  • 16 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    LESS THAN TWO YEARS INTO HISRETIREMENT, Bob Morris was tired ofbeing bored during the winter. Thatchanged when he discovered snowmo-biling.

    The 20-year U.S. Air Force veteranand Montrose resident tagged alongwith a friend in 1997 to a local snow-

    mobile and ATV club meeting. After hisexperience riding through the snow, hewas hooked.

    "Snowmobiling gives you free-dom," Morris explained. "You cantravel to places you could never see anyother way than by snow. And you'renot causing any damage or danger to

    the grass or trail. You're not restrictedto a path."

    Although Morris is no longer amember of the club, the UncompahgreValley Trail Riders, he still regularlysnowmobiles.

    That's because Montrose and sur-rounding communities offer plenty of

    Montrose resident Bob Morris says the Western Slope offers an

    abundance of excellent snowmobiling terrain.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e rSnowmobilingMontrose area offers prime territory

    b y M a t t L i n d b e r g

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 16

  • great places to enjoy the sport, Morris said.It starts with Grand Mesa Morris' favorite spot. Grand

    Mesa has an area of about 500 square miles, running 40 mileseast of Grand Junction between the Colorado and Gunnisonrivers.

    "It offers a variety," Morris said. "It has big open areas,places where you can climb hills and groomed trails. It has thebest of everything."

    But that's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to pop-ular local locations to ride, Morris explained.

    The 63-year-old said there are several other good places toride, including the Uncompahgre Plateau and Silver JackReservoir.

    The Uncompahgre Plateau, which is about 20 miles west ofMontrose, features several groomed trails, but lacks openspaces to cruise through, Morris said.

    The trails can be taken clear up north to Grand Junction, ifyou're feeling adventurous. For those who wish to do some off-road cruising, its possible, but not easy. The area is full of trees.

    "It's a nice spot if you like riding on trails," Morris said.Silver Jack Reservoir, about 40 miles east of town, is anoth-

    er spot that offers variety. The area features a mix of groomedtrails that you can take for miles and features open places to"play," Morris said.

    Snowmobiling is a lot of fun, but those who try it shouldalways be cautious, he said.

    "Never travel alone," Morris said. "Avalanches are not ahuge problem because this area in Colorado doesn't have thesteepest mountains, but they do happen occasionally."

    Morris said all participants should be prepared to stay thenight in the wilderness in the event they become stranded.That's why he encourages everyone to follow his lead by bring-ing food, water, a fire starter, and at least one change ofclothes in addition to proper equipment, such as gloves and aski mask.

    "I can't over-stress safety," Morris said. "You can be out ona beautiful day, get stuck and have to spend the night. The realbig thing is that you should never go alone."

    He also said he encourages riders to purchase emergencylocater beacons. Those beacons strap on to a snowmobiler'schest and, in the event he or she gets buried in an avalanche,the receiver allows another person to find the rider by its abili-ty to make a beep when close to that person.

    Montrose and other Western Slope towns are great forsnowmobiling, said Rich Jakino, president of the UncompahgreValley Trail Riders snowmobiling and ATV club.

    We get a lot of great snowfall, Jakino said. The snow isfairly moist and has a good texture. And there are a lot of greatareas to do it.

    He encourages people interested in the sport to first partic-ipate in snowmobiling tours, which are given at Grand MesaLodge in Cedaredge. To find out more, call (970) 856-3250.

    To join the Uncompahgre Valley Trail Riders, call Jakino at(970) 209-8900.

    17FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 17

  • 18 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Homebrew Connection'sperfect companion for long, chilly nights

    FOR REBECCA DORR, THE TURNINGOF THE LEAVES from green to gold andthe reappearance of snow on the sur-rounding peaks not only serve as a har-binger of fall and winter, they mean amarked increase in business at theHomebrew Connection, the beer brew-ing supply store she operates with herhusband Lenord and son Brandon.

    That's partly because home brewing

    is more easily accomplished in the win-ter, she said, when Western Slope resi-dents are better able to regulate thetemperature inside their home. Butmostly, she said, fall and winter justseem to be beer brewing season here.

    "We have so many outdoor things todo in Colorado, we're all too busy to besitting around brewing beer," she said,smiling.

    As freezing temperatures and snowdrive folks off the trails and inside theirhomes, Dorr said, their minds often turnto the ancient art of brewing, a part ofhuman civilization almost from the

    Brandon Dorr of the Homebrew

    Connection surveys his Nut Brown.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e r

    b y M i k e E a s t e r l i n g

    Knockin'Nut Brown

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 18

  • beginning. And the Dorrs enthusiastically recom-mend their Knockin' Nut Brown, an American-style brown ale, as the perfect beer to brew whenthe mercury starts to fall.

    "It's a little bit heavier," Brandon Dorr said,describing the Knockin' Nut Brown. "It's betweena full-fledged wheat beer and a porter or a stout."

    Rebecca Dorr describes the Nut Brown as amalty brew, one that provides the drinker with a"full-mouth" feel.

    "It's got hops in it, but it is not hoppy, likewhat comes with (India pale ales)," she said. "Thehops are more subtle because of the amount ofmalt in it. And it's got a distinct nutty aroma andflavor in it."

    It is the specialty grains in the Knockin' NutBrown that distinguish it, she said, though shenoted all the base grains in the brew are grown inthe state the Alamosa area, in particular. (Seeaccompanying recipe.)

    The Homebrew Connection offers theKnockin' Nut Brown recipe in both all-grain andpartial-mash versions, so it's a beer that can beeasily made by both veteran home brewers andthose just starting out. Brandon Dorr, left, and Rebecca Dorr, with the Homebrew Connection,

    show off their newly created Nut Brown.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e rC o n t i n u e d p 2 0

    Communities are like families

    2011 WellsFargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (644508_03258)

    When everyone comes together, wonderful things can happen. The spirit of community is alive and well, right here and now.

    Montrose$)/Montrose South*2). )1 wellsfargo.com

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 19

  • 20 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    The all-grain version takes four to five hours to brew, whilethe partial-mash recipe can be completed in two a half hours,she said.

    It's a beer that's appealing to both groups, Rebecca Dorrsaid.

    "I do have a lady who is just starting out, and this is going tobe her first recipe, and she's going to do a partial mash," shesaid. "She had some from a batch of ours last spring, and shesaid she liked it and wanted to give it a shot.

    "And, yes," she said, smiling, "we do have women brewersin Montrose."

    But the list of fall and winter beers by no means begins andends with the Knockin' Nut Brown. Brandon Dorr said when hecalls to mind a good fall beer, he thinks of a spicy pumpkin ale.

    "I like those nice fall flavors," he said. "But those beers aretypically of a lighter variety. As it cools down even more, a lot ofpeople go to stouts and porters."

    One of the ironies of home brewing in a place like Colorado,he said, is that it's actually much easier to brew a lager usu-ally thought of as a summertime beer here in the winterbecause it ferments at a lower temperature.

    Whatever your preference, the Dorrs can set you up with theingredients and equipment to brew the beer style of your

    choice. They even offer lessons for those just learning the craft.The Homebrew Connection, www.thehomebrewconnec-

    tion.com, is located at 20 S. Nevada Ave. Its phone number is249-4683. It is open 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday.

    Knockin Nut BrownPerfect companion for long chilly nights Cont. from p19

    We believe inthe fine art of teaching.the fi ne art of teaching.We believe professors are at their best when they can concentrate on teaching.

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    coloradomesa.edu/montrose

    RECIPE: Knockin Nut BrownList of ingredients All-grain version

    8 pounds of Colorado Base Pale Two Row malt 1 pound of Crystal malt 80L 1 pound of Munich malt 1 pound of Victory malt 8 ounces of Chocolate malt 8 ounces of Maltodextrin 1 teaspoon of Irish moss 1.5 ounces of Hallertau pellet hops

    AA 3.8 percent 1 ounce of Tradition pellet hops

    AA 5.0 percent 1 Safale US-04 (Dry English ale Yeast)

    or WLP002 (Liquid English ale yeast)

    Courtesy of Rebecca Dorr The Homebrew Connection

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:05 PM Page 20

  • Judy Copeland(970) 209-1966

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    Serving the entire Western Slope,Including Montrose, Delta, Cedaredge, Ridgway, Ouray and more!

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 21

  • LIKE MANY HIGH SCHOOL GRAD-UATES, Jesse McCombs believed join-ing the military offered many opportu-nities to gain specialized training andsee the world. When he graduatedfrom Montrose High School in 2001,he went straight into the Army.

    McCombs was in advancedinfantry training in Maryland whenAmerica was attacked on Sept. 11,2001. His brother, Heath McCombs,was stationed in Germany at the time.The veteran recalled that there weresoldiers all around him who had fami-ly members who worked in andaround the twin towers of the WorldTrace Center, and they were unable tocontact them to find out if they wereOK.

    "As Americans, we were attacked,and as a response, we went to warwith terrorists and anyone who sidedwith them and was a threat to us,"McCombs said.

    When he and his unit first made itinto Baghdad, he recalled that almostall of the civilians were happy to seethem. Even Iraqi soldiers were surren-dering without a fight because theywanted something better.

    Thankful to beHome

    b y E l a i n e H a l e J o n e s

    Jesse McCombs stayed in the Army until

    April of 2006, when he was discharged

    with the rank of sergeant.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e r

    22 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Local veteran recallsservice in Iraq with pride

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 22

  • "Those are the moments I want to remember," he said."This was when we accomplished something good that weall could be proud of."

    McCombs went to Iraq twice with the 3rd InfantryDivision. His first tour of duty was in 2003, when Americainvaded Iraq. He served eight months. His second tour ofduty was for 15 months. His unit went through a numberof name changes during the time he was serving in the mil-itary.

    McCombs stayed in the Army until April of 2006, whenhe was discharged with the rank of sergeant.

    "I got out because being a father and a husband wasmore important," he said. "It was way too hard to be afather when I was gone. My son was born in May of 2005.It was in the middle of my second deployment. I missed thefirst six months of his life, and that was the hardest thingfor me to bear."

    Despite the hardships of being away from his family, thelocal veteran said he was proud of what he did in the mili-tary and wouldn't change a thing.

    "It was an honor to serve with the men and womenwho were willing to give their life for this country so we allcould keep our freedom," he said.

    Today, as events continue to unfold in Iraq andAfghanistan, McCombs believes that American soldierswere and are giving their lives so other people can have thesame chance at a good life as Americans have.

    "I thank God that I made it home to my son, and I praythat the rest make it home to their families, as well," hesaid.

    In recognition of Veterans Day on Friday, Nov. 11, sol-diers like McCombs take time to reflect back 93 years ago,when the armistice between the Allies and Germany inWWI took place at the 11th hour of the 11th day ofNovember 1918.

    "Veterans Day for me is a day to remember what allveterans have done for this country and to give thanks tothose that have fought for us," McCombs said.

    (Above) Jesse McCombs, left, holds his son Tyler.

    (Right) When McCombs and his unit rolled into Baghdadin 2003, he says most civilians welcomed them and many

    Iraqi soldiers surrendered without a fight.c o u r t e s y p h o t o s

    23FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    997700--441177--44335522330011 EEaasstt MMaaiinn SStt.. ,, MMoonnttrroosseeddaahhlliiaafflloorraallddeessiiggnnccoolloorraaddoo@@ggmmaaiill..ccoomm

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  • 24 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Astronomical society protects night skyTHERE'S A VAST WORLD OUT

    THERE, one filled with soothing dark,and startling shots of color. Unendingmajesty and knowledge waiting tobe tapped. It's a world John Poolexplores every chance he gets, and it'seasy for you to do it, too.

    Just look up.Pool and his friends are here to help

    you get to know the universe. Together,they founded the Black CanyonAstronomical Society 11 years ago toraise public interest, provide scientificinformation about astronomy, and

    encourage dark-sky preservation."We are an outreach organization,"

    Pool, now the group's president, said."We want to try to bring astronomy tothe general public, and provide a meansfor that."

    The members report success: Sincethe society began keeping statistics, itsmembers have made contact with1,800 to 2,000 people a year.

    The BCAS works with the NationalPark Service and schools to provide pub-lic awareness, education and the popu-lar summertime "star parties" at Black

    Canyon of the Gunnison National Park.The society usually hosts a winter-

    time star party at the park in lateJanuary or early February, as well. In all,members put on about 40 public eventseach year.

    During viewings, society membersare on hand to explain what attendees

    SeeingStars

    John E. Pool, president of the Black Canyon

    Astronomical Society, sets up his 20-inch

    Dobsonian telescope at Ridgway State Park.

    c o u r t e s y p h o t o

    b y K a t h a r h y n n H e i d e l b e r g

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 24

  • see, share scientific fact, and mythological lore. They also followprograms put on by NPS interpreters who specialize in astronomy.

    The BCAS sets up a variety of telescopes, including larger-aperture ones, to allow observers an up close look at thegalaxy above their heads everything from constellations tothe fiery Omega Swan Nebula; from planets, to solar flares (viathe society's sun watch programs and special telescopes).

    "The knowledge (of astronomy) varies from completebeginners to people who have NASA experience or have actu-ally worked at observatories," Pool said of star party and pro-gram attendees. In 2010, he even bumped into a descendantof the Earl of Ross. The earl built a large telescope in Ireland inthe 1800s, Pool said.

    "You run into a lot of very interesting people. The mostinteresting part about astronomy is you can start talking aboutthe planet, the stars, the sun. It doesn't really matter whatsocial class anyone attending is a member of," he said.

    "Everyone is the same: They look out there and it's just'Wow.' It has a tendency to take people away from (daily rou-tine) and into a world that's not the common, everyday. ... Younever know what kind of a seed you planted. That makes itworthwhile."

    Preserving dark skies is critical to BCAS success and tothe public's access to a view of the universe.

    "We do a lot of our programs in conjunction with theNational Park Service," Pool said. "They and the InternationalDark Sky Association are attempting to reduce some of theamount of artificial light pollution around these parks. TheBlack Canyon has been recognized as a 'dark site.'Consequently, we work with the NPS."

    Light pollution is a real problem in the West, he said, evenin the city of Montrose, where antique light fixtures downtownshoot up steady beams of light. The BCAS has been workingwith the city to get it to use shielded lights.

    "The spread of these urban areas, even Grand Junctionand Montrose, throws up quite a light halo," Pool said. "Itdoes obliterate that part of the sky, a lot of the stars that youcan see."

    The skies above the Black Canyon park are nice and ebony,though and one of the reasons for the "rather intensiveastronomy program," Pool said.

    "That's a selling point for Montrose, in that people docome up there to partake of those astronomy lectures and thethings they can see through telescopes the BCAS supplies forthe NPS."

    The astronomical society's founding members in addition toPool are Bob White, Monica Treadway, Tom Jaskunas, MaryWhite and Verlee Sanburg. It now boasts of about 32 mem-bers and anyone is welcome. {See Society Details box.}

    "We really do love the astronomy we do," says Pool. "It'scontagious. If we get enthusiastic about it, they (members ofthe public) get enthusiastic about it. I think that's part of thesecret to it."

    SOCIETY DETAILS Annual membership is $12 per person or

    $20 per family. The only qualification is aninterest in astronomy. Contact the society via its website, www.blackcanyonastronomy.com.

    Meetings are held the last Tuesday of each month, with the exceptions of November and December, when there are no meetings, due to the holidays.

    Meeting locations alternate between the old City Council chambers in Montrose (off Centennial Plaza on South First Street) and the Delta USC jobs placement site, 1402 S. Main St. in Delta. Check website for updated information and times.

    Most public events are held during summer months. See website for events calendar.

    Many fabulous images to pique your interest can be found on the site's image gallery.

    Contact info: John Pool at jezpool@ix.netcom.com or Bryan Cashion, bcas_vp@bresnan.net.

    SummitRehabilitation

    Center at

    (970) 249-9683 1043 Ridge St., Montrose

    v RReehhaabbiilliittaattiioonn uunniitt wwiitthh pprrooggrraammss tthhaatt iinncclluuddee pphhyyssiiccaall,,ooccccuuppaattiioonnaall,, aanndd ssppeeeecchh tthheerraappiieess

    v WWee aacccceepptt MMeeddiiccaarree,, MMeeddiiccaaiidd,, BBlluuee CCrroossss BBlluuee SShhiieelldd,, AAnntthheemm,,UUnniitteedd HHeeaalltthh CCaarree,, aanndd HHoossppiiccee aanndd RReessppiittee ssttaayyss..

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    25FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 25

  • Ode to Aspens

    I lay down in the grove;Its now the middle of May.Hello my budding friends,Im so glad to spend time with you today.

    The snow is mostly goneAnd summer is getting near;The swiftness of this season is a race of time I increasingly fear.

    I lay down in the grove; Its now late in July.I was biking in your neighborhoodAnd couldnt wait to stop and say hi.

    There is such a heat in the valleyAnd here Im welcomed by your rippling shade.The temptation is to pass by quicklyBut your lovely coolness makes me glad Ive stayed.

    I lay down in the grove;Its now the end of September.Your quaking yellow leavesare my favorite sound to remember.

    The smell of the sun on your pale barkThe blended palate of red, orange, and fading green,Fill me with a peace like no other,All my senses pleased in one pastoral scene.

    I ski into the grove;Its now when short days mark the season.You stand stripped of your colors; white against white,But I still come here for a reason.

    You tie together the sun and the meadows and streams and the game;All of the things I love best.You stand patiently until I seek you;You are my symbol of the beauty of the West.

    b y B o b Te s c h

    26 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 26

  • Your retirement doesnt have to be defined by a big corporationran apartment complex where residents are just a room number

    and hidden charges are the norm. You have a choice.Spring Creek Chalet is the affordable alternative to assisted living.

    Respite Care is available.

    At Spring Creek Chalet we think retirement is about:Living comfortably. Freedom to do the things you want to do when you wantto do them. Not having to worry about whos cooking - you know your mealis going to be fresh and delicious. A friendly beauty/barber shop down the hall,not across town. Feeling safe and secure with emergency assistance availablewith the pull of a cord. Housekeeping service to clean your linens, wash thetowels and to make sure your dry cleaning gets picked up. Having great friendsand neighbors. Transportation to take you shopping, church, the doctors officeor anywhere in town youd like to go. An enthusiastic greeting from your furrycompanion - pets are always welcome.

    Established 1959

    Contact the MCP Box Office for informationand reservations. (970) 249-7838

    MAGIC CIRCLE COMMUNITY THEATRE420 S. 12th St., Montrose, CO www.magiccircleplayers.com

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    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 27

  • LIVING ON THE WESTERN SLOPEOFFERS a number of advantages,particularly for outdoors enthusiastswhose ideal winter consists of seeingsnow, snow and more snow, as wasthe case last year.

    That could be the case again thisseason, as well, but early indicationsare that the winter of 2011-2012 isshaping up as an iffy proposition.

    According to Jim Pringle, a mete-orologist with the National WeatherService office in Grand Junction, thispart of Colorado is in for an unusualoccurrence this winter. Last year, theWestern Slope benefited from the

    formation of a La Nia in the PacificOcean, and many parts of the regionreceived above-average snowfall,resulting in a heavy snowpack.

    A second consecutive La Niaalready was taking shape in lateSeptember, Pringle said, explainingthat the best forecast indicated thatat least a moderate La Nia woulddevelop over the ensuing months.

    That's not something weatherwatchers see very often, he said. Andit's not terribly good news forWestern Slope residents hoping for alot of snow this year.

    "Since 1900, there have been 10

    periods of two consecutive years ofmoderate to strong La Nias, andwhen that has happened, eight outof the 10 times, the second year hasbeen drier than the previous year,"he said. "The two times it was wet-ter were in the 1950s and 1970s."

    Pringle said the research that out-look is based upon was developed byDr. Klaus Wolter, a scientist with theNational Oceanic and AtmosphericAdministration in Boulder.

    "Based on that and some otherindicators, this winter may not haveas much precipitation as last winter,"Pringle said.

    28 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Let it Snow or not

    Western Slope likely in for another La Nia,but precipitation may be lacking this winterb y M i k e E a s t e r l i n g

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 28

  • But that's no reason for winter sports enthusiasts and the merchants who depend on the customersthat snow attracts to despair, he said, qualifyinghis remarks by explaining the difficulty of trying toforecast the weather months in advance.

    A La Nia pattern typically results in colder andwetter conditions for the northwestern UnitedStates, Pringle said, while the Southwest usuallyexperiences warmer and drier conditions. Coloradoand Utah, which sit on the border of those tworegions, can go either way, depending on where thejet stream settles, he said.

    Last year, the jet stream pushed farther south,bringing heavy snowfall to much of Colorado, hesaid.

    "I would be perfectly pleased with no differencefrom last year," Pringle said, echoing the sentimentsof many Western Slope residents.

    From Jan. 1 to May 1 of this year, the UpperColorado Drainage Basin which includes water-ways that drain into the Colorado River upstream ofGrand Junction had a snow water equivalent of157 percent of normal, Pringle said, an indicationthat snowfall in that region was much heavier thannormal.

    But farther south, he said, the numbers declined.The Gunnison River region total was 139 percent ofnormal, and the San Miguel-San Juan region wasonly 95 percent of normal.

    "We did have abundant snowfall in most moun-tain areas, and even in the Southwest, 95 percent ofnormal is not that bad," Pringle said. "But we areanticipating less this year. Is that how things will turnout? I don't think we can answer that one at thistime. We are hoping for the best. We like to haveplenty of good snow for skiing and snowshoeinghere."

    Down in the Uncompahgre Valley, the snowfalltotal is usually far less than it is in the mountains, ofcourse. The average annual snowfall for Montrose is27.4 inches, according to the NWS.

    Early indications may not mean much, but sum-mer lingered a little longer than normal this year inMontrose. As September wound to a close, hightemperatures in the 80s were several degrees higherthan normal for that time of year. On average,Montrose experiences its first freeze on Oct. 5, whileits first "hard freeze" defined as any time themercury dips below 28.6 degrees takes place onOct. 17.

    On the back end of winter, Montrose averages itslast hard freeze on April 27 and its last freeze onMay 10.

    29FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 29

  • Icy Ascent | J o e l B l o c k e r

    A climber clings to a

    cliff face during the

    2011 Ouray Ice Festival.

    The event, which

    attracts participants

    from around the world,

    returns Jan. 5-8, 2012.

    30 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 30

  • 31FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Hutchinson Western Livestock Panels,Gates and Feeders

    Powder River Panels, Gates and Squeeze Chutes Wood and Wire Fencing

    www.westernimplement.com2940 N. Townsend, Montrose

    970-252-13112919 North Ave, Grand Junction

    970-242-7960

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 31

  • YearningforYurts

    Outdoors enthusiastshave a home away from home

    WITH THE COLORADO YURT CO.HEADQUARTERS located inMontrose's backyard, many areabusinesses and residents have foundthat yurts a circular dwelling madeof fabric provide a comfortableand unique outdoor experience inthe mountains, even during colder

    months."We were one of the first in

    Colorado to get involved in (yurts),and it's worked very well," saidKirstin Copeland, park manager forRidgway State Park, 28555 U.S. 550,approximately 15 miles south ofMontrose.

    The park following in the foot-steps of Oregon's state parks setup several yurts about 10 years agofor visitors to rent.

    "Their use is usually centered onevents and holidays," Copeland said."The ice climbing festival (in Januaryin Ouray) and holidays bring people

    b y K a t i O ' H a r e

    32 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 32

  • into the yurts. They like that parksetting. We also have hunters whouse them, and outside of that, it'sfamilies and couples really, adiverse group."

    Just down the road at Orvis HotSprings, 1585 County Road 3 out-side Ouray, three yurts are used bythe hot springs spa for massages.

    "A lot of people ask where wegot them," general manager TereseSeal said. "One nice thing aboutthe yurts is the dome in the topthat lets in natural light."

    Call (970) 626-5324 for infor-mation about the yurts.

    Colorado Yurt Co., located at28 W. South 4th St., makes severaldifferent styles of yurts and cancustomize them. The yurts are soldall over the country, but they aremade in Montrose. Kirstin Copeland, park manger for Ridgway State Park, stands in one

    of the yurts the park rents out.p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e r

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    33FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 33

  • info@alpinehealthcare.net www.alpinehealthcare.net970-249-7377 37 N. Nevada Ave. Montrose, CO 81401

    Chiropractic Massage Acupuncture

    Orthotics Yoga Therapy Meditation

    Now offering Yoga and MeditationThurs. &Sun. at Uncompahgre Yoga Circle, 310 S. 9thFor times please see www.alpinehealthcare.net

    OURAYAPPTS.available onWED.

    Dr. Ken Edgar, DCDC, Dipl. (Med) Ac. (FIAMA)

    439 East Main StreetMontrose, Colorado 970.249.7877

    The design is based on the tradi-tional Mongolian yurt. It's a roundstructure made of fabric, and each isstandardized with at least three win-dows.

    For winter use, the companyoffers an insulation package.

    "As long as there is a consistentheat source, they stay nice inside,"said Ivy Fife, Colorado Yurt's market-ing manager.

    Ridgway State Park's yurts are

    open year round, and each has a dec-orative propane stove that can warmthe yurt up to 80 degrees, Copelandsaid. Some are outfitted with otheramenities, as well, including a refrig-erator, microwave, beds and akitchen table. The only thing theydon't contain, she said, is runningwater, but a flush restroom is rightnext door.

    The yurts cost $70 per night atthe park. Call (970) 626-5822 forinformation about renting one.

    The yurts also are popular in thebackcountry, Fife said. The compa-ny's winter stout alpine yurt can hold

    150 pounds per square foot ofunbalanced snow a not-unheard-of situation in Colorado, she said.

    "It will stand up to our snowstorms," Fife said.

    Colorado Yurt has been in busi-ness since the mid 1970s and hasbeen located in Montrose for 15years, making a unique and durableproduct easily accessible by thearea's businesses and residents. Call(800) 288-3190 for more informa-tion.

    Yearning for Yurts C o n t . f r o m p 3 3

    Outdoors

    As long as there's a constant heat source available, yurts can stay quite cozy inside, even in the middle of a Western Slope winter.c o u r t e s y p h o t o

    34 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 34

  • OOuurr MMeeddiiccaall LLooccaattiioonnss::DDeell ttaa

    1450 E. 3rd St.(970) 874-2828

    MMoonnttrroossee531 Main St.

    (970) 240-9556

    GGuunnnniissoonn720 N. Main

    (970) 641-6036

    Hartman Brothers has over 100 years ofproven, reliable and honest service!

    35FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    WINTERWONDERLANDNov. 1st thru Jan. 1st

    (970) 249-6109 (970) 240-6109 fax16612 S. Townsend Ave. Montrose, CO 81401

    www.camelotgardens.com

    Decorated theme trees Ornaments & garlandsArtificial pre-lit trees

    Artificial garland,wreaths, & picks

    Silk floral arrangementsCenterpieces

    Candles, potpourriHouse plants

    Fresh cut treesFresh wreaths & garlands

    House PlantsHardgoods

    Trees, Shrubs, VinesPerennialsAnnuals

    Water Gardening

    Candles Candle AccessoriesLotions & Potions Room Fragrances

    Silk Florals & PotpourriGifts & Collectibles

    GIFT SHOP

    GARDENCENTER &NURSERY

    All Seasons...All For You

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 35

  • VACATIONS ARE USUALLY FULL OFNEW, FUN ADVENTURES, but they canalso mean that the daily routines peo-ple become so accustomed to amorning workout or Sunday afternoonfootball game on television are leftat home. That doesn't have to be thecase when visiting Montrose, though

    it's all here, too.Here's a sampling of how to contin-

    ue to enjoy your favorite daily or weeklyactivities while visiting the city.

    Free Internet/reading materialThe Montrose Regional Library, 320

    S. Second St., is a great location to surf

    the Internet, check emails or pay billswhile you're away.

    "Everyone is always welcome in thelibrary whether they are a card-holdingmember or just passing through," refer-ence librarian Sara Anders said.

    The library has 15 public-accessInternet computers, 14 of which can be

    36 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    No need to ditch daily routine: sports, coffee,Internet and gym are all readily availableb y K a t i O ' H a r e

    It's All Herein Montrose

    Montrose Regional Library patrons use the library's computers in early September.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e r

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 36

  • OFFICE MACHINE SALESShredders CalculatorsToner Furniture Ink

    Office Supplies FaxesSamsung Printers

    Kyocera CopiersCash Registers

    401 N. 1st St., MontrosePhone: 970-249-4600

    Fax: 970-249-4864

    Kevin Angeles, foreground, rides a cycle during a recent

    workout at High Country Fitness.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e r

    Patrons watch sports games on the many televisions

    at RnR Sports Bar in Montrose.

    C o u r t e s y / R n R S p o r t s B a r

    used for up to 50-minute sessions. Oneis a 15-minute express computer.

    "If a person is traveling throughtown, we have visitor passes they canuse to access the Internet," Anders said.

    There is free Wi-Fi throughout thebuilding for people with laptops or othermobile devices. For people needing aquiet work area, the library's study roomscan be reserved for up to two hours.

    There are two ways for people tocheck out library materials. The libraryhas a collection of paperback books thatuse the honor system and can bechecked out and returned without acard, or with a valid mailing address.And visitors can sign up for a library card

    in just a few minutes. "Even if you don't live here but you

    come here every summer, you can be amember of our library," Anders said.

    For more information, call the libraryat 249-9656.

    Sports barThe RnR Sports Bar, 35 N.

    Uncompahgre Ave., is fairly new to theMontrose scene and adds a slice of big-city life to Montrose's downtown.

    With 10 50-inch televisions and two120-inch screens, it's not hard to findyour favorite sports game. And RnR car-ries football, basketball and baseballpackages, owner Lanham Rattan said,

    so it's easy to catch a game featuringyour favorite team no matter wherethey're playing.

    The sports bars serves American cui-sine and has drink specials during thegames. Sunday offers breakfast and abloody Mary bar from 10:30 a.m. to 3p.m., and mimosa specials are alsooffered.

    During halftime, patrons can enjoy agame of darts, pool, shuffle board orfoosball.

    The bar is open 11 a.m. to midnightMonday through Saturday and from10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Sunday. Call765-2029.

    C o n t i n u e d p 3 8

    37FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 37

  • Workout facilitiesMontrose is home to several gyms,

    including national franchise establish-ments, so you may even be able to useyour hometown membership to get agood workout.

    Curves, 245 W. Main St., has classesthroughout the day, as well as the newZumba workouts. Call (800) 704-5908for more information.

    In case you are staying on the south-ern end of Montrose, you might want totry Anytime Fitness or Snap Fitness, bothof which give you the convenience of24-hour access, as well as Z Fitness.

    Anytime Fitness, 1544 Oxbow Drive,has all the same features as Snap,including a tanning bed. For more infor-mation, call (970) 249-5557. Snap,1541 Oxbow Drive, has 4,000 squarefeet of space that includes cardiomachines, free weights and strength-training machines. The gym offers class-es, as well. For more information call(970) 252-1771. Z Fitness, 2305 S.Townsend Ave., Suite C, are group fit-ness specialists, they offer classes suchas zumba, boot camp, pilates, kick box-ing and body sculpting. Classes areavailable Monday through Saturday. Call(970) 252-9400.

    A staple of Montrose's downtownfor several years has been High CountryFitness, 10 Selig Ave. It offers a widerange of equipment, as well as a hand-

    ful of classes, including kickboxing andpilates. Members enjoy 24-hour keycard access. For more information call(970) 240-9777.

    The Montrose Recreation Districtalso provides swimming opportunities atits Aquatic Center, 25 Colorado Ave.Call (970) 249-7705 for open and lapswim hours.

    Coffee and specialty drinksMany travelers find that they just

    can't live without their morning mochaor chai tea. But don't worry, Montrosehas great coffee shops, as well.

    The Coffee Trader, 845 E. MainStreet, is a local favorite and is alwaysbustling with activity. And it's not just

    the drinks that drive the popularity; thebusiness also offers homemade treatssuch as pumpkin bread and other bakedgoods. It's also a great place to get yourlocal newspaper the Montrose DailyPress fix. Call 249-6295.

    And there's plenty of good coffee andpastries on the other side of town, too,including the Looney Bean coffee shop,3480 Wolverine Drive. Call 240-4320.

    "I love great coffee," said KatyGildehaus, a Looney Bean aficionado.

    Also on the south side of Montrose isStarbucks, with one location insideTarget, and another at 16400 S.Townsend Ave. Call (800) 235-2883.

    The Coffee Trader, at 845 E. Main St. in Montrose, has been a hot spot forlocals in the morning for more than a decade.

    p h o t o b y J o e l B l o c k e r

    38 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Its a l l here C o n t . f r o m p 3 7

    Routines

    MMoonnttrroossee942 N. Park Ave. 249-3631

    TTeelllluurriiddee 728-1460ccoooolliinnggss@@mmoonnttrroossee..nneett 113388 NN.. TToowwnnsseenndd MMoonnttrroossee ((997700)) 224499--55006644

    FFaaxx:: 224499--22551122 bboossssiinnmmoonnttrroossee..ccoomm MMoonn.. -- FFrrii.. 88 aa..mm.. ttoo 55 pp..mm..

    BBusiness & OOffice SSystemSSCopiers

    Fax Machines

    Printers

    Shredders

    Calculators

    OfficeSupplies

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 38

  • SheShe Boutique and Gallery 970-249- 4944340 E. Main Street Mon-Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-5

    324 e. main st., montrose, co 81401 www.mikesimpsonart.com

    picture framing

    glass artgilding

    paintings lettering

    etched, 23 kt gilded, hand lettered mirror

    970.249.1098

    simpson galleryframe shopstudio

    Shop Historic Downtown Montrose!

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 39

  • Your guide to local dining.

    dine

    Pistachio Chicken SaladServed stuffed in Avocado with ourhomemade Peach - MargaritaDressing and Tortilla Strips. Saveroom for our award-winninghomemade desserts made fromscratch by our baker. Open dailyfrom 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. and Sundaybrunch from 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Livemusic every Wednesday 6 - 8 p.m.

    CAMP ROBBER P42

    Colossal BurgerA half pound burger with Swisscheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, 1000island dressing and to top it off 4 oz.of thin cut pastrami, all on a parme-san onion bun. Served with yourchoice of side, shown here with a mixof fresh cut home fries and sweetpotato fries. Open Tues. - Sat. 7 a.m. -2 p.m. and Sun. 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

    COWBOY CIAO P44

    Combination for TwoA unique El Jimador experience.Carne asada, pollo asado, andprawns all served on an extra largedish for two! Two plates of rice andbeans, guacamole and sour cream.Open 7 days a week.

    EL JIMADOR P43

    40 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Seafood FajitasSauteed shrimp, scallops and hal-ibut with garlic, other spices, bellpeppers, onions and tomatoes.Served with refried beans, our spe-cialty chimayo corn dish, rice, gua-camole, sour cream and pico degallo. Open Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. - 9p.m., Sat. 12 - 9 p.m. and Sunday 12- 8 p.m.

    AMELIAS P41

    Pan Roasted Atlantic SalmonFresh Atlantic salmon, pan roastedto perfection. Served with fall veg-etable caponata, glazed withbrown butter soy caramel. OpenTues.-Fri. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., Tues.-Thur. 5 - 9 p.m. and Fri. & Sat. 5 - 10p.m. Good times await you at TheBlue Table.

    THE BLUE TABLE P42 Fresh Beer and Homemade FoodEnjoy a fresh handcrafted beer, from aWheat to a Stout and everything inbetween. Also serving handcraftedRoot Beer, Orange Cream Soda, andSarsparilla. Enjoy delicious hot andcold sandwiches , or tantalizing appe-tizers. Open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mon. -Thurs., 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Fri. & Sat., and Sun. 12 - 8 p.m. Listen to live music onSaturday nights, mingle and drink a great Handcrafted beer.

    HORSEFLY BREWING CO. P45

    Hearty, Healthy and Homemade,offering up your home cookedfavorites from the freshest ingredi-ents. Breakfast served all day. Alsospecializing in hamburgers and sal-ads. We use peanut oil to cut outthe saturated fats. Come by to seeus and Jo Jo will cook you some-thing just the way you like it.Open 5 a.m. - 3 p.m. everyday.

    JO JOS WINDMILL P45

    Grand Mesa Mediterranean PizzaOne of 15 specialty pies on thePaghre's menu. Crisp, hearty doughtopped with garlic oil sauce, arti-choke hearts, sun-dried tomatoes,kalamata olives and grilled chicken.Add a hoppy beer, for a great diningexperience. Open Mon. - Sun. 11a.m. - 8 p.m. with hours extending to9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.

    PAHGRES P46

    Fresh can be fast even at a fast-casual, fresh Mexican grill.Perfection is fast! Come and getyour burritos, quesadillas, tacos,burrito bowls and salads filled withour freshest, highest-quality ingredi-ents. Lunch, dinner, or have itcatered. Open Mon. - Sat. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.

    PANCHEROS P46

    Come in and see us turn pure-and-simple ingredients into phenome-nal breads and delectable sweets!Enjoy fresh-made sandwiches,soups and our full line of locallyroasted coffee. Were openMonday through Friday 7 a.m. - 6p.m. and Saturday 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.

    GREAT HARVEST BREAD CO. P44

    LOCATOR GUIDE P51 Full page map withlocations marked.

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:07 PM Page 40

  • RED BARN P4716-oz. Rib-eye with King Crab legs A tasty rib-eye steak, served withKing Crab legs, mixed vegetablesand a baked potato. Wash thatdown with a Blue Moon beer orchoose from several on tap. Fordessert, indulge yourself with aslice of chocolate cream pie. OpenMon. - Sat. 7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. andSunday 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.

    RIB CITY P481/2 Rack Baby Back Ribs, Fried Fish,Deep Fried Corn and French Fries.This is our Tuesday night special.Come in and check out our other spe-cials. Youll love our friendly service.Open daily for lunch and dinner.Mon. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sun.11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. www.ribcity-montrose.com, 970-249-7427

    www.ameliashacienda.com

    224499--11888811 4444 SS.. GGrraanndd2 1/2 Blocks West of Townsend on Main St.

    Monday - Thursday 11am-8pmFriday - Saturday 11-9pm Closed Sunday

    GGrreeaatt FFoooodd&& GGrreeaatt MMaarrggaarriittaass

    Applewood Smoked BaconWrapped SirloinBaseball cut, 21 day dry-aged for abold beef flavor. Best served whileenjoying views of the majestic SanJuan Mountains and our pristinegolf course. Serving breakfast &lunch, Mon. - Sat. 7 a.m. - 9 p.m., Dinner Wed. - Sat. 4 -9 p.m., SundayBreakfast 7 a.m. - noon; Sunday Lunch noon - 6 p.m.

    REMINGTONS P48

    41FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Sin Burger with all the toppingsOur burgers are ground fresh on site,and cooked the way you want them.Come in for our daily specials madeFRESH. Watch the games on one ofour ten 50" HDTV's or our two 120"big screens. Open seven days a week.(970) 765-2029 or like us onFacebook. Great place to bring thefamily for lunch or dinner.

    RNR SPORTS BAR P49

    Chef Kong serves up fresh, made toorder sushi and Asian cuisine.From California rolls to Spicy Tuna.Offering fresh seafood fromMountain Valley Fish & Oyster. Likeus on Facebook and receive 50%off drinks. $2 wells and domesticbeers from 5-7 pm. Open Tues. - Fri.11 a.m. - 2 p.m., Tues. - Fri. 5 - 9p.m., & Fri. - Sat. 5 -10 p.m.

    SUSHITINI P49

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 41

  • Happy Hour Daily from 5-7pm.50% off Wine, Wells, and Domestics

    Come to theBlue Table and

    "check in" onFacebook, and

    receive 50% offdrinks.

    1135 EAST MAIN STREET, MONTROSE970.249.4446 www.bluetablemontrose.com

    42 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    VIEW OUR ENTIRE MENU, DAILY SPECIALS AND CATERING IDEAS ATwww.camprobber.com

    Dine-in or Take-OutMonday-Saturday 11am-9pm

    Sunday Champagne Brunch 9am-2pm

    Ahi Tuna Steak Salad with chef prepared Peach Margarita Dressing

    Desserts and Cheesecakesby our on-premise Baker

    Let us CATER your next gathering

    Menu ideas are endless!

    Sonoran Steak Pastawith Housemade Bread

    (970)240-15901515 Ogden Rd.

    MontroseSPECIAL MENUS FOR KIDS,

    VEGETARIANS OR GLUTEN-FREEFly into Camp Robber;

    explore yourtaste cravings- scan on yoursmart phone

    here

    CCrreeaattiivveeCCuuiissiinnee,,

    SSppeecciiaallss &&CCaatteerriinngg

    ssiinnccee 11999944

    We are proud tooffer hand-crafted

    food - from oursauces, soups,

    salad dressings,and every dessert,you will enjoy the

    unique flavorsthat we create.

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 42

  • TThhee SSkkiillll ooff tthhee JJiimmaaddoorrTThhee kkeeyy ttoo qquuaalliittyy tteeqquuiillaaiiss ttoo hhaarrvveesstt aaggaavveesswwhheenn tthheeyy aarree ppeerrffeeccttllyyrriippee,, aannyywwhheerree ffrroomm 88 ttoo1122 yyeeaarrss.. KKnnoowwiinngg wwhheennttoo hhaarrvveesstt tthhee hheeaarrtt oofftthhee BBlluuee AAggaavvee iiss tthheessppeecciiaalliizzeedd sskkiillll ooff tthheeJJiimmaaddoorr.. BBeeccaauussee ppllaannttssmmaattuurree aatt ddiiffffeerreenntt rraatteess,,ttwwoo aaggaavveess ppllaanntteedd tthhee ssaammee ddaayy ccaann ddiiffffeerr iinnhhaarrvveesstt ttiimmee bbyy aass mmuucchh aass ffoouurr yyeeaarrss.. OOvveerrllyyrriippee aaggaavveess pprroodduuccee aa bbiitttteerr,, fflloowweerrlleessss tteeqquuiillaa..AA ffeeww mmoonntthhss pprriioorr ttoo hhaarreessttiinngg aann aaggaavvee ppllaanntt,,tthhee JJiimmaaddoorr wwiillll ccuutt iittss cceennttrraall fflloowweerr ssppiikkee ttooeennccoouurraaggee ggrroowwtthh aatt tthhee cceenntteerr.. TThhiiss rreessuullttss iinn aaggrreeaatt sswwoolllleenn ppiiaa tthhee hheeaarrtt ooff tthhee ppllaanntt..WWhheenn tthhee ttiimmee iiss rriigghhtt,, tthhee JJiimmaaddoorr uusseess aasshhaarrpp,, ppaaddddllee--lliikkee bbllaaddee kknnoowwnn aass aa CCooaa ttoossllaasshh ooffff tthhee lleeaavveess aanndd rreevveeaall tthhee ppiiaa,, wwhhiicchhwweeiigghh uupp ttoo 115500 ppoouunnddss..

    FFeeaattuurriinnggAAuutthheennttiicc MMeexxiiccaann CCuuiissiinnee

    TTrraaddiittiioonnaall CCoocckkttaaiillss BBeevveerraaggeess

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 43

  • 44 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    We wont letyou

    leave hungry!

    Home of the famousCowboy Killer Giant Burrito

    Take down this monster in30 minutes or less and its free.

    Tuesday-Saturday 7-2Sunday 9-2

    1140 North TownsendMontrose, Colorado

    970-249-2204

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 44

  • 5AM-3PM EVERY DAY2133 East Main Street, Montrose

    under the Blairs Truckstop sign

    Hearty, Healthy,HomemadeFrom scratch to the table

    with fresh ingredients.

    Specializing in breakfast, burgers and salads.

    Something for everyone we have an eight pagemenu to choose from.

    Hometown PeopleHometown Food

    Welcome toMMOONNTTRROOSSEESS

    OONNLLYY BBRREEWWEERRYY!!New Handcrafted Beers on Tap Weekly!

    846 E. MAIN STREET

    horseflybrewing.com 970.249.6889

    Best Beeron Tap

    Come enjoy a great mealand a delicious, handcrafted beer.MMoonnddaayy -- TThhuurrssddaayy

    1111 aa..mm.. -- 99 pp..mm..FFrriiddaayy && SSaattuurrddaayy

    1111 aa..mm.. -- 1111 pp..mm..SSuunnddaayy 1122 -- 88 pp..mm..

    45FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 45

  • 46 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 46

  • 1412 E. Main St., Montrose, CO (970) 249-9202

    RED BARN FFaammiillyySStteeaakkhhoouusseeTuesdays Kids eat Free

    Wednesdays All you can eat BBQDaily All you can eat Soup & Salad

    Serving BreakfastThur.-Sat. 7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.

    Serving LunchMon.-Sat. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    Serving Dinner NightlyMon.-Sat. 3 p.m. to 10 p.m.

    Sunday Brunch9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    CELEBRATING OUR 45TH ANNIVERSARY!BBuurrggeerrss SStteeaakkss SSeeaaffoooodd PPaassttaaSSaallaadd BBaarr CCoommffoorrtt FFooooddssMMaaddee ffrroomm SSccrraattcchh

    TThhee

    First Place BestRestaurant, Appetizer, Breakfast,Steak, Hamburger, Live Music,Value/Price and Sunday Brunch

    We have a full bar and show up to sixdifferent sporting events at one time.

    ********We serve Sterling Silver Premium Beefbecause we believe in serving the best!

    COME INFOR OURDAILY

    SPECIALS!

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 47

  • Open Daily for Lunch & DinnerMon. - Thur. 11am - 8pm Fri. & Sat 11am-9pm

    Sun. 11:30am - 8pm

    Daily Lunch Specials & Dinner Specials Kids Menu

    Catering available Call for Take-out!(970) 249-7427 (RIBS)

    see our menu atribcitymontrose.comVOTED BEST OF THE VALLEY FOR RIBS

    Fresh food at a great value!

    BBQ smoked on site!

    Sides and sauces madefresh daily!

    Located in the Oxbow Crossing Shopping Center1521 Oxbow Drive Suite 165

    (SOUTH OF WAL-MART ON HWY 550)

    48 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Stunning views of the Nicklaus Design Golf Course& San Juan Mountains from our patio

    Date Night Special every Saturday,includes 4-course meal & bottle of wine for $44!

    Call to reserve space for your holiday party, wedding,reunion, birthday or meeting (smaller room available).

    James Cronin - General Manager Roy Perkins - Executive ChefRyan Hyle - Event Manager

    2500 Bridges Dr., Montrose 970.252.1119www.montrosebridges.com

    Wonderful New MenuServing Breakfast Saturday & Sunday, Lunch Daily

    and Dinner Wednesday-Saturday Evenings

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 48

  • 970.240.1100 228 East Main Montrose

    Roll with

    it!

    Best Patio Dining on Main Street www.sushitinis.com

    Montrose'sonly Sushi

    restaurant

    Sushi madefresh toorder by

    chef Kong.

    Also serving updelicious Asian

    cuisine.

    Serving Lunch:Tues.-Fri. 11am-2pm

    Serving Dinner:Tues.-Thurs. 5-9pm

    Fri.-Sat 5-10pm

    Sunday 10:30am - 9pm, Bloody Mary Bar and Breakfast Until 3pm

    Shuffleboard, Pool, Darts, Foosball and Golden Tee

    Outdoor Patio Late Night Kitchen Menu Ten 50 HDTVS and

    two 120 Big Screens 12 Beers On Tap Drink Specials for NFL Games

    35 N UncompahgreMontrose, Co970-765-2029

    MONDAY THRU SATURDAY11AM TO CLOSE

    49FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 49

  • ADVERTISERS DIRECTORYAll Saints Anglican 6

    Alpine Health 34

    Amelias 41

    Around the CornerArt Gallery 39

    Best Appliance 7

    BOSS in Montrose 38

    Camelot Gardens 35

    Camp Robber 42

    Canyon Gallery 39

    Coldwell BankerBailey & Co. 35

    Colorado MesaUniversity 20

    Coolings Heating& Air Conditioning 38

    Cowboy Ciao 44

    Crippin Funeral Home 20

    Dahlia Floral 23

    Delta CountyMemorial Hospital 29

    Delta-MontroseElectric Association 15

    El Jimador 43

    Flower Motor Co. 3

    Great Harvest Bread Co. 44

    Hartman Brothers 35

    Heirlooms for Hospice 15

    Hilltop Community 17

    Horsefly Brewery 45

    Jeans Westerner 9

    Jo Jos Windmill 45

    Keller Williams 21

    Lindal Cedar Homes 31

    Magic Circle Theatre 27

    Montrose ACT 52

    Montrose Arts Council 33

    Montrose County 9

    Montrose Implement 17

    Montrose MemorialHospital 2

    Montrose Pavilion 31

    Montrose RegionalLibrary 11

    Montrose Signs 37

    Mylars AutoRefinishing 11

    Office Machine Sales 37

    Pahgres 46

    Pancheros Mexican Grill 46

    Plastic SurgerySpecialists 7

    Pioneer Propane 6

    Red Barn Restaurant 47

    Remingtonsat the Bridges 46

    Rib City Grill 48

    RnR Sports Bar 49

    San Juan Living Center 25

    SheShe Boutique 39

    Simpson GalleryFrame Shop & Studio 39

    Sleep Factory 13

    Smile Makers 13

    Spring Creek Chalet 27

    Sushitini 49

    Tiffany, Etc. 34

    Treasured Teeth 27

    Tri River Appliance 33

    Volunteers of America 13

    Watson Insurance 9

    Wells Fargo 19

    Western Implement 31

    Z Fitness 13

    Acknowledgements

    PublisherFrancis Wick

    General ManagerTim Frates

    Managing EditorMike Easterling

    Design EditorBen Jones

    PhotographersJoel Blocker

    Staff WritersKatharhynn Heidelberg

    Elaine Hale JonesMatt Lindberg

    Kati OHare

    ContributingWritersBob Tesch

    ContributingPhotographers

    Lu Ann Tyrrell970-249-1190

    www.coloradoscenes.com

    Production TeamKatrina Kinsley

    Advertising SalesDennis AndersonDana SpoffordRyan McKee

    50 FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    On the Cover:

    Many of us will go weeks or even months at a time

    without giving the neighboring area a second thought, but

    a blaze of fall color reflected in this local waterway is

    impossible to ignore.

    photo by Lu Ann Tyrrell

    3684 N.TownsendMontrose CO, 81401(970) 249-3444www.montrosepress.com

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 50

  • to Ridgway& Ouray

    N

    EW

    S

    MONTROSE

    51FA L L / W I N T E R 2 0 1 1 DESTINATION MONTROSE

    1. Amelias

    2. The Blue Table

    3. Camp Robber

    4. Cowboy Ciao

    5. El Jimador

    6. Great Harvest Bread Co.

    7. Horsefly Brewery

    8. Jo Jos Windmill Restaurant

    9. Pahgres

    10. Pancheros Mexican Grill

    11. Red Barn Family Steakhouse

    12. Remingtons at the Bridges

    13. Rib City Grill

    14. RnR Sports Bar

    15. Sushitini

    RESTAURANT LOCATOR

    to Gunnison

    Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 51

  • Destination Fall 11 10/27/11 12:09 PM Page 52