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1 Presentation to APAN Honolulu, Hawaii February 1, 2001 Donald R. Riley Chair, IEEAF Associate Vice President and CIO University of Maryland, College

Mar 27, 2015

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1 Presentation to APAN Honolulu, Hawaii February 1, 2001 Donald R. Riley Chair, IEEAF Associate Vice President and CIO University of Maryland, College Park Slide 2 2 About IEEAF With the Internet's rich successes, many of which were stimulated by academic needs and interests as well as technical skills and planning, we now stand ready to promote what could be, essentially "universal educational access". The US regulatory climate achieved "universal service" for voice and the combination of technologies and competition, globally, now offer the promise of bandwidth rates and for a much richer combination of learning media and pedagogies. IEEAF seeks to provide and stimulate real benefits for educational institutions and their learning communities. Slide 3 3 IEEAF Vision "Non Nobis Solo" (Not by ourselves alone) We share a vision intended to accelerate the growth of Internet2 such that it: Enables and stimulates the rapid expansion of educational collaboration in many forms between and among teaching and learning institutions around the world. Cultivates and promotes practical solutions to delivering scalable, universally available and equitable means of access to suitable bandwidth and necessary network resources in support of these collaborations. Slide 4 4 Achieving the Vision To achieve this vision we intend to create frameworks and alliances between University and other educational leadership groups as well as with key public and private sector partners to: Advance prudent strategies to secure and leverage network-related assets, and to capitalize on events associated with the build-out of the global submarine and terrestrial fiber optics networks. Create a spirit of wise stewardship to secure, leverage and deploy both these assets themselves and the equal and fair use of the bandwidth available from these assets for a broad range of educational purposes. Devise creative and flexible governance structures and processes to ensure the most responsive results are achieved in the use of these assets. Manage these resources to serve the broadest of global, national, and institutional priorities for educational access -- University, secondary, or elementary levels. "Non Nobis Solo" (Not by ourselves alone) Slide 5 5 IEEAF Vision Further, we believe that we can help create both the infrastructure and incentives to encourage the expansion of innovation and the means to promote stronger ties between educational institutions, industry and national leaders by stimulating the development of programs and activities that: Mentor and develop the human potential of our students Expand the technical skill development and employability of our students Broaden the means for faculty to conduct bandwidth intensive research and instruction Reduce the potential that "less than universal access" to important educational resources remains a barrier for some in the new millennium Nurture new opportunities for job creation and productivity growth made possible by such connectivity "Non Nobis Solo" (Not by ourselves alone) Slide 6 6 IEEAF Strategies To achieve the vision of IEEAF, we intend to create frameworks and alliances between University and other educational leadership groups as well as with other key partners. Methods of helping IEEAF include donations of physical facilities (co-location and riser space), equipment, licenses to "rights of way","dark fiber" or conduits at selected points of build-out of the US and global fiber-optical network, or wave-lengths. Such donations will be a principal means of connectivity and linkage for educational institutions to conduct teaching and learning. Slide 7 7 IEEAF Organization Slide 8 8 Honest Broker Group (IEEAF) Accepting assets Matching Corp assets w/Educational needs Advocate for assets on behalf of Education Granting of assets as Free Use licenses Slide 9 9 IEEAF Organization Regional/National Network Organizations Partners and advisors to IEEAF Operational management of expanded networks Slide 10 10 IEEAF Board IEEAF Board of Directors Slide 11 11 IEEAF Board IEEAF Board Executive Committee Don Riley, Chair (University of Maryland) Ron Johnson, Vice Chair (University of Washington) John Charles, Secretary (CSU Hayward) Jerry Hanley, Treasurer (Cal Poly State University) Slide 12 12 IEEAF Affiliates Corporations, educational institutions, government entities, and regional/national networking organizations wishing to contribute to the expansion of next generation internet capabilities and advanced research and education network collaborations may become an affiliate of IEEAF. Partnership between these varied entities ensure the most effective means of promoting global connectivity and collaborations by actively leveraging our collective resources, stakeholder base, and spheres of influence, as well as with government agencies, foundations and corporations who share in and seek to advance our vision. Slide 13 13 GEO builds carrier hotel buildings and brings together multiple parties -- where the wet meets the dry. GEO - The Catalyst Government SubmarineFiber TerrestialFiber Slide 14 14 GEO builds carrier hotel buildings and supports the IEEA Foundation goals which include helping to solve the digital divide. GEO - The Catalyst Government SubmarineFiber TerrestialFiber + Universities Slide 15 15 Think Globally Act Locally Slide 16 Hayward, CA Carrier Hotel Carrier splice points and access point to BART ROW MFN POP (Location approx.) PacBell CO BART right of way used by Carriers (Level 3, Williams, MCI, XO Comm, NetStream, etc) to service the East Bay market 15,000 sq. ft. for IEEAF Slide 17 Proposed Cable Head-end and Carrier Hotel at Ocean City, MD 200 sq. ft. for IEEAF Slide 18 College Park. MD Carrier Hotel 15,000 sq. ft. for IEEAF Slide 19 Carrier Network Benefits from the proposed VA/MD Economic Development Initiatives DC to Atlanta carrier traffic corridor Atlanta to Chicago/ Detroit carrier traffic corridor DC to points west carrier traffic corridor Red solid line = carrier opportunity for route diversity/redundancy for traffic going south from DC.(blue line) while, at the same time, collecting international traffic at two submarine cable landing sites. Two new submarine cable landing sites. Kentucky Virginia New and/or diverse/redundant routing for east-west / north south telecom traffic flows. Opportunity to split rings. DC Red lines = New network paths that result from the VA/MD/ Kentucky communications development zones. Example of possible carrier interest might be Level 3. Discussion with Level 3 shows possible interest in splitting their large DC to Atlanta to Chicago to DC ring. Slide 20 Detailed view of carrier opportunities captured by VA/MD economic development initiatives Existing network traffic path used by most carriers from DC to Atlanta Proposed VA e58 and e13 Telecommunications Development Zones. Two new submarine cable landing sites. Possible telecom development zone. New University of MD College Park Carrier Hotel jointly developed by GEO and the U of MD. Purple line is fiber connection to internl MAE East Internet 2 site at Hagerstown, MD. Preston Lane Bridge Chesapeake Bay Bridge New VA cable landing and Carrier Hotel jointly developed by GEO and the State of VA. Slide 21 Detailed view of carrier opportunities captured by proposed VA/Kentucky economic development initiatives Continuation of proposed VA telecom development zone. Suggested Kentucky telecom development zone. Existing network traffic paths used by many carriers from north to south. ? Extend Kentucky zone west to the extent necessary to meet carrier north-south routes. Slide 22 22 Border States Municipalities Universities Utilities GEO, IEEA INITIATIVES AND SURA S U R A Maryland Kentucky Virginia Oregon Washington California Oklahoma Georgia Texas Louisiana Arkansas Mississippi Alabama Tennessee Florida S.Carolina N.Carolina W.Virginia Delaware Wash. DC New Jersey Iowa Montana Idaho Slide 23 23 Think Globally -- Act Locally Slide 24 24 Netherlands Example: Project Glasbak Slide 25 25 Life in the Digital Delta Wallchart on EU Telecom Fiber Optic Backbones 2000 Source: Financial Times/Fortis Copyright 2000 Jaap [email protected] Slide 26 26 Phase 1: 70,000 km -- 35 major cities ready for service by end-2002 The TyCom Global Network Slide 27 27 Phase 2: 180,000 km; six continents planned 5-year build schedule The TyCom Global Network Phase 1 Phase 2 Slide 28 28 The TyCom Global Network Transatlantic and Northern Europe Systems New York - London - Paris - Frankfurt - Amsterdam July 2001 London - Groningen - Hamburg December 2001 Slide 29 29 Essent Kabelcom Fiber build-out Fiber Donation to IEEAF Slide 30 30 Groningen Carrier Hotel Slide 31 31 GroNingen Internet eXchange Groningen Slide 32 32 Why are we here? To tell you about IEEAF To invite you to work with us Slide 33 33 Phase 1: 70,000 km; 35 major cities; ready for service by end-2002 Phase 2: 180,000 km; six continents; planned 5-year build schedule The TyCom Global Network Phase 1 Phase 2 Slide 34 Http://www.ieeaf.org/ Government SubmarineFiber TerrestialFiber + Universities Slide 35 Slide 36 36 THE INTERNET EDUCATIONAL EQUAL ACCESS FOUNDATION A Thank You Amsterdam Groningen Hamburg 1.The Municipality of Groningens full commitment to the fiber requirements of the Electronic Age established the proper leadership environment for this project to occur. The Municipal Leadership 2.This municipal stewardship fosters business migration to the region and long term, allows young adults to live and work in that region. Slide 37 37 Amsterdam Groningen Hamburg North AmericaAsia Pacific Eemshaven TYCOM Tycoms commitment to excellence proceeds beyond its products and services. The Water Route Partner Tycoms employees are personally committed to help bring the benefits of communications closer to every country in the world. THE INTERNET EDUCATIONAL EQUAL ACCESS FOUNDATION A Thank You Sl