Top Banner

Click here to load reader

1. Introduction 2. Folding and faulting 3. Reverse Landforms and Hazards 1. Introduction 2. Folding and faulting 3. Reverse faults 4. Normal faults 5. Transform (strike-slip) faults

May 21, 2018

ReportDownload

Documents

vuongdien

  • Tectonic Landforms and Hazards

    1. Introduction

    2. Folding and faulting

    3. Reverse faults

    4. Normal faults

    5. Transform (strike-slip) faults

    6. Tectonic hazards

  • OROGENIES and OROGENESIS

    Examples (Christopherson, 2012, p. 343-345):

    1. Laramide orogeny (Rockies), 40-80 my BP

    2. Nevadan orogeny, 29-35 my BP

    3. Allegheny orogeny (Appalachians), 250-300

    my BP

    4. Alpine orogeny (European Alps), 2-66 my BP

    5. Himalayan orogeny, 45-54 my BP

  • Continental shields. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p. 336.

  • Continental shields and exotic terranes. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p. 338.

  • Folds and faults. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p. 340.

  • Compressional force

    Development of folds due to compression.

  • Compressional force

    Anticline

    Syncline

    Asymmetric/recumbent folds

    (overturned anticline)

    Development of folds due to compression.

  • Malans Peak (anticline), Ogden, UT.

  • Compressional force Fault plane

    Development of a fault from folding: a reverse

    (thrust) fault, the result of compression.

  • Fault plane

    Reverse (thrust) fault: result

    of compressional stress. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p.342.

  • Normal fault: result of tensional stress. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p.342.

  • Transform (strike-slip) fault: result of lateral

    (shearing) stress. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p.342.

  • Fault plane

    Reverse (thrust) fault: result

    of compressional stress. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p.342.

  • Fault scarp

    produced by a

    reverse (thrust)

    fault in Algeria,

    following

    magnitude 7.3

    earthquake, 1980. Source: Bloom, 1998; photo by M.

    Meghraoui.

  • Normal fault: result of tensional stress. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p.342.

  • Triangular facets

    indicating normal fault scarps

    Normal faults along the Wasatch Front.

  • Triangular facets near Mapleton, UT. Source: Utah Geological Survey, 1996.

  • Triangular facets near Ogden, UT, viewed from Highway 89.

  • Triangular facets near Ogden, UT, viewed from Highway 89.

  • Source: David Schultz, Pictures from 2002 Winter Olympic Weather Forecaster Training

    http://www.cimms.ou.edu/~schultz/olympics/images/img20.gif

    Aerial photo of Weber Canyon and the Wasatch Front.

  • Diagram of the

    Wasatch Fault:

    a NORMAL fault. Source: UGS, 1996.

  • Graben (down-faulted block)

    Horst (up-faulted block)

    Horst and graben: features of extensional stress. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p.345.

  • The Basin and

    Range province

    of the western U.S. Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  • Transform (strike-slip) fault: result of lateral

    (shearing) stress. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p.342.

  • The San Andreas Fault- An Example of a

    Transform Fault. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p. 344.

  • Effects of a transform fault, southern California. Source: Cornell University Geology Department, Geo 101 image gallery.

  • Effects of the San Andreas fault. Source: University of Washington Department of Geophysics, magnetotellurics research.

  • Utah earthquakes,

    1977-1996. Source: USGS National Earthquake

    Information Center.

  • Map showing general

    location of the Wasatch

    Fault in Utah. Source: USGS.

  • Focus

    Epicentre

    Focus and epicentre at the Loma Prieta

    earthquake, CA, 1989. Source: Christopherson, 2012, p. 350.

  • Diagram of the

    Wasatch Fault:

    a NORMAL fault. Source: UGS, 1996.

  • Ground shaking

    response to a M7.0

    earthquake on the

    Wasatch Fault. Source: Utah Geological Survey.

  • Liquefaction

    potential map for

    Salt Lake County. Source: Utah Geological Survey.

    High: 50% in 100 years

    Moderate: 10-50%

    Low: 5-10%

    Very low: less than 5%

  • Liquefaction potential:

    Weber

    County.Source: Utah

    Geological

    Survey.

    High

    Moderate

    Low

Welcome message from author
This document is posted to help you gain knowledge. Please leave a comment to let me know what you think about it! Share it to your friends and learn new things together.